Patterns of sensory loss Flashcards Preview

Clinical symposium > Patterns of sensory loss > Flashcards

Flashcards in Patterns of sensory loss Deck (27):
1

is the dorsal column pathway fast or slow conducting fibres

fast conducting fibres

2

what type of sensation does the dorsal column have

fine discrete touch, position.
sense.
vibration
uncrossed in cord.

3

is the spinothalamic pathway slow fibres or fast fibres

slow fibres

4

what type of sensation does the spinothalamic pathway carry

pain and temperature

5

where does the dorsal column pathway run in the spinal cord
ipisilateral
or contralateral

ipsilateral

6

where does the spinothalamic pathway run in the spinal cord

contra laterally.

7

how do fibres enter the cord in both the dorsal column and spinothalamic pathway

via the dorsal root ganglion

8

what are the presenting symptoms in Bernard sequard syndrome

pain and temperature loss on contralateral side
discriminative touch and and propricoeption loss on the ipsilateral side.

9

what is horn's syndrome and which organ does it affect

loss of sympathetic sensation in the eye

10

how might a lateral medulla lesion (wallenburg) present

pain and temperature of contralteral body but ipsilateral face.
cranial nerves 10 and 11 leave here therefore they are also affected.

11

pain and temperature are split in the body up until which point of the brainstem.

medulla

12

how do a patient with anterior spinal syndrome present

pain and temperature lost- spinothalamic pathway is anterior
2 point touch and discrimination is present.
paraplegia-loss of motor function below lesion (in legs)- ventral and lateral corticospinal tract.

13

If a patient suffers form loss of sensation on one whole side of the body, both face and body then were must the lesion be.

thalamus
(Until the medulla both the face and body are separate)

14

what are the risk factors of a lacunar stroke

high BP, smoking ,diabetes

15

what is a lacunar stroke

affecting small perforating vessels.

16

what are the common presenting signs of parietal lobe deficit (cortical lesion)

Dysgraphesthesia- difficulty recognising letters or words which are drawn on the back of a patents hand.
Hemisensory neglect
R/L confusion

17

define syringomelia.

Syringomyelia is a type of disorder that occurs when a cyst forms within the spinal cord- in the middle of the spinal cord

18

what are the clinical presentations of syringomelia

2 point touch and proprioception is not affected.
loss of pain and temperature in both hands and across the body in a cape like distribution.
wasting in small muscles of arm
weakness in muscles of the legs

19

what is the treatment for syringomelia

shunt to remove CSF which is filling in the canal, if this is not done then it will lead to paralysis.

20

what 2 pathways are affected by syringomelia

corticospinal pathway and spinothalamic pathway
takes of crossing pathways- close to the vertebral canal.

21

what chemical levels are affect sensory neuronal pathways

arsenic

22

in peripheral neuropathies what is the term used for the distribution of sensory loss

gloves ans stokcings- affects arms and legs

23

are reflexes often absent in peripheral neuropathies

Yes

24

what are the main causes of peripheral neuropathies

diabetes melitus
autoimmune (Guilain Barre, CIDP, vasculitis)
toxic
vitamin deficiency
paraneoplastic
chronic kidney and liver disease

25

what causes a purely sensory stroke

thalamic infarct

26

where do lesions occur in dissociated sensory loss

spinal cord and brainstem

27

what condition can cause a peripheral neuropathy dementia

antibodies which cause B12 deficiency.
Antibodies in the stomach damage parietal cells so that it cannot be absorbed.