Respiratory Physiology & Impaired Gas Exchange Flashcards Preview

CI1 > Respiratory Physiology & Impaired Gas Exchange > Flashcards

Flashcards in Respiratory Physiology & Impaired Gas Exchange Deck (58)
Loading flashcards...
1

What is dead space?

Where gas exchange is not being undertaken

2

What are the two types of dead space?

Anatomical: In conducting airways, e.g. trachea
Alveolar: Alveoli that aren't being exposed to blood flow so don't contribute to gas exchange

3

What makes up the majority of dead space?

Anatomical, only very small amount of alveolar dead space

4

What is reduced alveolar ventilation associated with?

- Rapid shallow breathing
- Increased physiological dead space

5

True or false: The distribution of air in the lungs is not equal

True

6

Why is the distribution of ventilation uneven within the lung?

- Varying pleural pressures from the bases to the apices (interaction with lung compliance)
- Patterns of respiratory activation

7

When you take a breath in, where does most of the air go?

The base of the lungs, i.e. it is not evenly distributed

8

Why is the intrapleural pressure less negative at the base than the apex?

Because of the weight of the lungs

9

In what area of the lungs do the alveoli expand the most?

At the apex, because of the differences in pleural pressure

10

What is the relationship between volume and lung compliance?

At higher volumes the lung becomes stiffer

11

How is blood flow distributed across the lungs?

More blood flow at the base, decreases as it gets higher due to gravity and pressures from the surrounding alveoli

12

What is the relationship between ventilation and perfusion and what does it mean?

- Ratio of air reaching the alveoli to blood reaching the alveoli via capillaries
- Greater at the apex
- Blood coming from different parts of the lungs have different levels of oxygenation

13

What 3 main respiratory problems can physio treat?

- Shortness of breath (dyspnoea)
- Difficulty clearing sputum
- Lung collapse (atelectasis)

14

What two factors determine oxygen delivery to the tissues?

- Content of oxygen in arterial blood (CaO2)
- Cardiac output (CO)

Delivered O2 = CO x CaO2

15

What are the two ways oxygen is delivered to tissues?

- Bound to haemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells
- Dissolved in plasma

16

What is hypoxia?

Inadequate oxygen delivery to tissues

17

What are the signs of severe generalised hypoxia?

- Reduced level of consciousness (LOC)
- Seizures
- Coma
- Death

18

What are the signs of hypoxia?

- Cyanosis (blueish discolouration)
- Tachycardia & hypertension
- Shortness of breath & tachypnea
- Restlessness & confusion
- Sweating
- Pallor

19

What are the causes of hypoxia?

- Reduced CO or perfusion
- Dysoxia (disruption of cell enzymes)
- Haemoglobin deficiency
- Hypoxaemia (decreased partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, PaO2)

20

What are the normal haemoglobin ranges?

Females: 11.5-16 g/100mLs
Males: 13-18 g/100mLs

21

How is hypoxaemia defined?

Decreased partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood PaO2 < 80mmHg

22

What is hypoxaemic respiratory failure?

PaO2 < 60mmHg

23

What is the normal PaO2 in arterial blood?

80-100mmHg

24

What is the effect of ageing on PaO2?

PaO2 decreases as a normal function of age

25

How does PaO2 and PaCO2 change at gas exchange?

Venous PaO2: 40mmHg
Arterial PaO2: 100mmHg

Venous PaCO2: 46mmHg
Arterial PaCO2: 40mmHg

26

During inspiration, why does PaO2 decrease between the atmosphere and the alveoli?

Due to moisture in the airways

27

What is the normal arterial percent O2 saturation (SaO2)?

95-100%

28

What happens at PaO2 of 60mmHg?

SaO2 is approx 90%
Oxygen content (CaO2) falls rapidly below SaO2 of 90%

29

What happens with decreased affinity of O2 for Hb?

- Right shifted curve
- Favours O2 unloading
- Acute acidosis
- High CO2
- Increased temp
- Abnormal Hb

30

What happens with increased affinity of O2 for Hb?

- Left shifted curve
- Favours O2 loading
- Acute alkalosis
- Decreased PCO2
- Decreased temp