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Dermatology > Skin Infections > Flashcards

Flashcards in Skin Infections Deck (79)
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1

What virus cause skin infections

HPV
Herpes simplex ( HSV)
Herpes Zoster (HZV)
Molluscum contagiosum

2

What bacteria cause skin infection

Normal skin flora protect but if skin damage micro-organism can penetrate
S.aureus
Strep
Corynebacterium minitissimum in acne

3

What fungi cause skin infection

Tinea
Candida albican
Yeast
Piturosporium
True fungi

4

What ectoparasites cause skin infection

Scabies
Cutaneous leishmaniasis

5

What does HPV lead too

Warts on body
Hyperkeratotoic papules or nodules
Most common at sites of trauma
Incubation = 4 months
Transferred by direct skin contact

6

How do you Rx

Consider if painful, unsightly or persist
Should resolve 24 months
Chemical paint
Cryotherapy
Imiquidmod for genital - usually sexual transmission

7

What does primary exposure to HSV cause

1st clinical episode
Most severe
Virus becomes latent in neural tissue in DRG

8

What can reactivate virus

Trauma
Menstruation
Sunlight
Fever
Virus then tracts down nerves

9

How does HSV present

Closely tinny packed vesicle / pustule
Monomorphic - same
May only see erosions if skin is fragile e.g. genitals
May see ulcers on thick skin
Often proceeded by burning or itching

10

If recurrent vesicles what should you suspect

HSV

11

Who is at risk of severe infection

Immunosuppressed
Atopic tendency

12

How do you Rx

Acyclovir - oral or topical

13

What does primary exposure to HZV lead too

Chicken pox
Then becomes latent
When reactivated = shingles

14

What are features of shingles

Pain in dermatome region as virus tracks down nerves
Rash after 4 days of pain
Dermatomal
Vesicular
If in ophthalmic devision of 5th CN = urgent referral

15

What are complications

Scarring
Post-shingles neuralgia
Meningnitis
Encephalitis

16

How do you Rx

Opthamologist if in eye area
Oral acyclovir if immunocompromised, >50, eye involvement
IV if severe

17

When are you non-infective

When vesicles dry up

18

Who gets shingles vaccine and what type

All elderly 70-79 SC
Live attenuated so CI if immunosuppressed

19

What is molluscs contagiosum

Common skin infection caused by MCV virus
Transmission via close contact
Very common in children, immunocompromised, atop eczema

20

What are the features

Pinky pearly white papules
Central umbilication
Up to 5mm in diameter
Appear in clusters
Common on trunk and flexure
May get lesions on genitalia if sex

21

How do you Rx

Self limiting within 18 months
Do not share towels as contagious
Cryotherapy if lesion troublesome
GUM if on genitals + STI screen
Ophthalmology if eye lid
HIV if +Ve

22

What are complications and how do you treat

Eczema or inflammation so Rx
Emollient or steroid if itch
Ax if bacterial infection on top - topical fusidic or fluclox

23

What is pityriasis Rosea

Acute self-limiting rash
Herald patch - usually on trunk to start
Followed by erythematous oval scaly patches
CHaracterisitc distribution
Longitudinal line

24

What causes and how do you treat

Viral-predrome
Lasts 6-12 weeks - self limiting
Symptomatic treatment of itch wit antihistamine, emollients, steroid

25

What is impetigo and what causes

Superficial bacterial skin infection that occurs when bacteria enter through a break in the skin
S.aureus = 70%
Strep A
Can be primary or secondary to eczema / scabies / bite

26

How does it present

Golden crusted lesion
Tend to be on face and flexures

27

How do you Rx

Topical fusidic acid = 1st line if local
Fusabet = Ax + steroid
Flucloxacillin if extensive
Oral erythromycin if allergic

28

Do you exclude from school

Yes till lesions crust or 48 hours on Ax

29

What is erysipelas and what causes / RF

Form of cellulitis but only in dermis and upper SC tissue
Strep pyogene
S.aureus

RF
Wounds
Local ulcer
Immunosuppression
Minor skin injury

30

What are the features

Most common in LL
Swelling
Erythema
Warm
Painful
May have associated lymphangitis
Systemically unwell - fever / rigors
Raised plateau into erythema

Differentiated from cellulitis as well defined red raised border