STEP 1- RNA Viruses 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in STEP 1- RNA Viruses 2 Deck (24):
1

Yellow Fever virus:
Family and transmitted by
Symptoms (3)

Flavivirus
Transmitted by Aedes mosquito
Symptoms: high fever, black vomitus, jaundice

2

Rotavirus:
Major global cause of what?
Which population? two of their locations?
Pathogenesis?

Major global cause of INFANTILE GASTROENTERITIS
Children: daycare centers and kindergartens
Villous destruction with atrophy leads to DECREASED absorption of Na+ and loss of K+

3

Genetic shift/antigenic shifts in the influenza virus cause?
What does genetic drift cause?

Genetic shifts (sudden) cause pandemics.
Genetic drifts (gradual) cause epidemics

4

Rubella:
Symptoms (4)
Describe the Rubella rash

1. Fever, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias, fine rash
2. Fine macules that start on the face and spread "CENTRIFUGALLY" to involve the trunk and extremities

5

What does congenital rubella cause?

"Blueberry muffin" appearance indicative of extramedullary hematopoiesis

6

Tx for rubella:

Supportive (symptomatic) only

7

Paramyxoviruses all contain surface ____ protein. What does this do?

Surface F protein. Causes respiratory epithelial cells to fuse and form multinucleated cells.

8

What is Palivizumab and what does it do? Which viruses is this effective for?

"Palivizumab" is a monoclonal antibody against the F protein that is ued to prevent pneumonia caused by RSV infection in premature infants

Paramyxoviruses

9

Characteristics of measles: 2

1. Klopik spots
2. Descending maculopapular rash

10

Late complications of measles

1. SSPE- subacute sclerosing panencephalitis
2. Encephalitis
3. GIant cell pneumona

11

What in the hell is a Klopik spots? Timing of the rash and the Klopik spots

Bright red spot with blue-white center on buccal mucosa that precedes the measles rash by 1-2 days

12

Mumps symptoms:
Mumps makes your parotids and balls as big as POMS-poms

P- parotitis
O- orchitis
M- Meningitis
S- sterility

13

Rabies virus:
Look for what finding on microscopy? Which cells show this?
Incubation period?
Post-exposure treatment? (3)

1. Look for NEGRI bodies--commonly found in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and hippocampus
2. Incubation period is long: weeks to months
3. wound cleansing, vaccine, rabies immunoglobin

14

How does rabies travel in the body post-infection?

Travels to the CNS by migrating in a retrograde fashion up the nerve axon

15

Progression of rabies disease:

fever, malaise --> agitation, photophobia, hydrophobia--> paralysis, coma --> death

16

What is the best test to detect ACTIVE hep A infection?

Anti-HAV (IgM)

17

Which test detects prior hep A infection or vaccine?

Anti-HAV (IgG)

18

What serologic marker indicates hep B infection?

HBsAg (Hep B surface antigen)

19

What serologic marker indicates immunity to hep B?

Anti-HBs

20

What is HBcAg? What does it indicate?

Antigen associated with core of HBV.
Active viral replication

21

What is ANti-HBc? what do the IgM and IgG indicate? When is this positive?

Anti-HBc is the antibody to HBcAg.
IgM indicates an acute/recent infection
IgG indicates prior exposure or chronic infection
Positive during window period

22

What is HBeAg? what does it indicate?

Second, different antigenic determinant in the HBV core. Indicates active viral replication and high transmissibility

23

What is Anti-HBe? What does it indicate?

Ab to HBeAg; indicates low transmissibility

24

what is the "window period" in terms of HBV?

During the window period (or equivalence zone) of hepatitis B, both serological markers HBsAg (Hepatitis B surface antigen) and Anti-HBs (antibody against HBsAg) are negative (which is because, although Anti-HBs are present, they are actively bound to the HBsAg).