TB, HIV, and Hepatitis Flashcards Preview

Adult Health > TB, HIV, and Hepatitis > Flashcards

Flashcards in TB, HIV, and Hepatitis Deck (52):
1

Is latent TB infectious?

No

2

How often does latent TB develop into active TB?

10%

3

What is military TB?

Carried to all parts of the body

4

Who is at risk for TB?

Immunocompromised: DM, HIV, cancer, DM, renal failure, steroid therapy, debilitative state
Close contact: boarding schools, homeless shelters

5

Where is TB seen on CXR?

Upper lobes

6

Signs and symptoms of TB?

Cough, fever, weight loss, lethargy, anorexia, night sweats, cough, chest pain, hemoptysis

7

What is the only diagnostic test for TB?

sputum test

8

When should you test for resistance for TB, and what is defined as resistance?

Always, Drug resistant is resistant to one drug, while multi drug resistant is resistant to more than one drug

9

How do you check the TST?

Based solely on induration, not erythema

10

DD for TB?

Penumonia, pneumoitis, neoplasm, fungal infection, sarcoidosis, pulmonary fibrosis

11

What do you monitor for Isoniazid?

liver function and peripheral neuropathy. Can cause dark urine

12

What will occur with rifampin?

Dark urine

13

Side effects of pyrazinamide?

GI, myalgia, and arthralgia

14

What do you do for Ethambutol?

baseline eye exam, visual acuity and color vision, CBC and CNS

15

What's the preferred therapy for TB?

Direct observation therapy for drug resistant, intermittent therapy, and risk for non adherence

16

Functions of the liver?

Bile, eliminiates biliruben, metabolizes hormones and drugs, syntehsizes proteins, glucose storage, stores minerals and vitamins, converts ammonia to urea, converts fatty acids to ketones, filters the blood for metabolites and bacteria

17

Different causes of acute hepatitis?

Autoimmune, drugs, toxins, infections (bacteria, virsuses)

18

How are the different forms of viral hepatitis separated?

Only by serology

19

Three stages of hepatitis?

Prodromal, icteric, convalescent

20

Hep A transmission?

Fecal oral route

21

DD for hepatitis A?

Mono, cancer, obstructive jaundice, ETOH hepatitis or cirrhosis, liver injury, food poisoning, HIV acute, CMV

22

How do you test for Hep A

IgM and IgG

23

How do you transmit hep b?

blood or body fluids

24

How often does Hep B become chronic?

6-10%,

25

Labs for evaluation of Hep B?

HIV, GGT, genotype and viral load, serum iron, liver panel, abdominal imaging

26

Nomenclature for Hepatitis?

E- envolope- center
C- core- middle
S- surface, outside
Ag- antigen from virus
Ab- antibody from host

27

HBeAg?

active viral repilation

28

HBcAb?

Previous exposure

29

HBsAb?

Immunity

30

HBsAg?

Persistant virus

31

How do you treat HBV?

With GI MD. Most important carcinogen after tobacco.

32

Treatment for HBV exposure?

HB IG within 48 hours

33

Who get's immunized?

MSM, all infants

34

How is Hep C contracted?

Primarily through infected blood

35

Incubation for hepatitis C?

14-180 days, with average of 45 days

36

Who develops symptoms and percentage that develop into chronic HCV?

20-30 develop acute symptoms, and 70-85% develop chronic HCV

37

Labs for HCV?

AntiHCV, HCV RNA PCR, genotyping, LFTs, ETOH, CBC, pregnancy test, TSH, A1C

38

Who do you screen for HCV?

Born 1945-1965, IVDU, recipient of clotting factors before 1987, HD

39

Shortest timeline treatment for active TB? Usually length of treatment?

6 months is shortest treatment
9 months is usual treatment

40

Test results for >5 mm, >10 mm, and >15 mm

>5- HIV, immunocompromised, transplant, CXR healed TB
>10- foreigners, medically underserved, IVDU, risk factors, all other medical conditions that could predispose somebody like DM, cancer, gastric surgery
>15 all other person

41

Who should receive hepatitis a vaccine?

Recent infection, acute infection, children, MSM, IVDU, occupational risk, clotting disorder

42

treatment for hepatitis A?

usually self limiting, can do IgG within two weeks

43

Treatment for hepatitis B?

Only do medications for chronic hepatitis B virus.

44

Chronicity rate for hepatitis B?

5-10%

45

Treatment cure for HCV?

Sustained virology response for 24 weeks after then end of treatment

46

What should you do for people with hepatitis ABC?

Screen for alcoholism and cessation?

47

How long is Genotype 1 treated for HCV and Genotype 2, 3, and 4

Genotype 1 is 48 weeks
Genotype 2, 3, and 4 is 24 weeks

48

Most common cause of ALT and AST?

Fatty liver

49

What does HBeAG and HBsAg suggest

Infected
HBeAg- active viral replication
HBsAg- persistant virus

50

What does IgM anti HBc suggest?

Acute infection

51

What does HBcAb suggest?

Pervious exposure

52

What does HBsAb suggest?

Immunity