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Flashcards in Treatments Deck (52):
1

What is OMM?

Application of osteopathic philosophy, structural diagnosis, and use of OMT

2

What is OMT?

Theraputic application of manually guided forces by an osteopathic physician to improve physiologic function or support homeostasis

3

How do you name a SD?

By the direction in which the motion is freer (position at rest)

4

What are the three causes of SDs?

Macrotraumas
Microtraumas
Congenital

5

Do all SD need to be addressed?

No--if congenital especially

6

How many aspects of TART are needed to Dx a SD?

One

7

Sidebending is named for which side?

The side of concavity

8

What is the anatomic barrier?

Limit of passive ROM

9

What is the physiologic barrier?

Limit of active ROM

10

What are restrictive barriers?

The functional limit within anatomic ROM which abnormally diminishes the normal physiologic ROM

11

What is the elastic barrier?

Difference between anatomic and physiologic

12

What are the forces utilized in OMT?

Extrinsic
Intrinsic
Active
Passive

13

What is extrinsic forces?

treatment forces which are not supplied by pt

14

What are intrinsic forces?

Voluntary or involuntary forces from within the pt that assist in manipulation

15

What are passive forces utilized by OMM?

Pt refraining from voluntary muscle contraction

16

What is an active force in OMM?

One in which the pt voluntarily performs a Dr direction

17

What is direct motion in OMM?

Engagement of restrictive barrier toward or through barrier

18

What is indirect motion in OMM?

SD is moved away from the restrictive barrier

19

What is the goal of direct/indirect motion?

Increased ROM

20

What are the six factors that determine modalities of treatment?

1. Size of pt
2. Size of Dr
3. Age of pt
4. Health of pt
5. acute vs chronic
6. location of treatment

21

What are the four transition points in the body?

1. Head/neck
2. Neck/thorax
3. Thorax/lumbar
4. Lumbar/sacral

22

Why are the four transition areas important?

Where most SDs occur

23

What is HV/LA?

Direct engagement of an end point or barrier using a quick motion over a short distance

24

Is HV/LA a direct or indirect technique? Passive or active? Intrinsic or extrinsic? Are results in tissue texture change fast or slow?

Passive
Direct
Extrinsic

Fast tissue texture change

25

Which OMM technique has the highest injury potential? What is this due to?

HV/LA due to muscle spasms

26

How often is HV/LA performed?

Once or twice a week

27

What produces the pop in joints?

Nitrogen gas release

28

How does the thrust used in HV/LA change the neural activity of muscles?

Alters the afferent output of mechanoreceptors, resulting in release of the muscle hypertonicity

29

What are the contraindications to HV/LA?

osteoporosis
Bony metastases spondylolisthesis
Osteomyelitis
RA
Fractures
Down's
Vertebral artery stenosis

30

Is muscle energy direct or indirect? Active or passive? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct
Active
Extrinsic and intrinsic

31

What type of muscle energy involves a chaning in tension of a muscle, without approximation of its origin and insertion?

Isometric

32

What type of muscle energy is an approximation of the muscle origin and insertion without chancing its tension?

Isotonic

33

Which type of muscle energy is a contraction of a muscle against resistance, while forcing the muscle to lengthen?

Isolytic

34

Which type of ME corrects SDs?

Isometric

35

Which type of ME is used to tone muscles, or strengthen a physiologic weak muscle?

Isotonic

36

Which type of ME is used to break up scar tissue, adhesions, or fibrous tissue

Isolytic

37

What are golgi tendon organs?

Organs present in the extrafusal muscle fibers, and measure tension in the muscle

38

What are gamma-motor neurons?

Neurons that regulate the gain of the stretch reflex (how fast it is moving) by adjusting the level of tension in the intrafusal muscle fibers of the muscle spindle

39

What is the principle behind ME?

reset the intrafusal and extrafusal muscle fibers during the post-contraction relaxation phase

40

What are the contraindications to ME?

low vitality

Fractures

Severe neuromuscular injuries

Cannot follow directions

Proper pt positioning cannot be achieved

41

Are soft tissue techniques direct or indirect? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct
Passive
Extrinsic and intrinsic

42

What are the contraindications to soft tissue techniques?

Cellulitis

43

Is strain/counterstrain a direct or indirect technique? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Indirect
Passive
Extrinsic and intrinsic

44

How does strain/counter strain relieve pain?

Reduces and arrests the continuing inappropriate proproceptor activity

45

Muscle spindles are very sensitive to changes in what dimension (length, width, height)?

Length

46

What are the contraindications to strain/counterstrain?

Position that cause dizziness or radicular pain

Extreme forward bending of the thoracolumbar spine is osteoporotic pts

47

Are cranial techniques direct or indirect? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct and indirect
Passive
Extrinsic and intrinsic

48

What are the contraindications to cranial techniques?

Acute head trauma

49

Are myofascial release techniques direct or indirect? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct and indirect
Passive
Extrinsic and intrinsic

50

What are the contraindications to myofasical release?

Flare-up of symptoms with immunological disorders

51

Are springing techniques direct or indirect? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct
Passive
Extrinsic

52

Are articulatory techniques direct or indirect? Passive or active? Extrinsic or intrinsic?

Direct
Passive
Extrinsic