Unit 1 - Feline Viral Diseases Flashcards Preview

Microbiology And Immunology 2 > Unit 1 - Feline Viral Diseases > Flashcards

Flashcards in Unit 1 - Feline Viral Diseases Deck (66):
0

What are the seven feline viral diseases

Panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis, calici virus, feline Corona virus/FIP, feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, rabies

1

What family is Panleukopenia in

Parvoviridae

2

Describe the structure of the Panleukopenia virus

Non-envelope DNA virus

3

How long can panleukopenia survive in the environment

For years on contaminated surfaces. Extremely stable virus

4

What can Panleukopenia cause in kittens

Severe acute gastroenteritis and leukopenia

5

Who are the most susceptible for panleukopenia

2 to 6 months of age cats

6

Describe the mortality rate for panleukopenia in kittens

Very high mortality rate. Can also kill susceptible older cats

7

Describe the incubation period for Panleukopenia

Five days

8

What is the route of infection for panleukopenia

Oral route

9

What happens if a mother is infected with panleukopenia in utero infection in first trimester

Abortion and fetal death

10

Describe what happens if a mother is affected with panleukopenia in second and third trimester

Cerebellar hypoplasia. Versus myocarditis for puppies

11

How is Panleukopenia transmitted

Virus is shed on all body secretions but primarily feces and can be transmitted in utero

12

What are the clinical signs of panleukopenia

Lethargy, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, turgid intestines, fever, hypothermia

13

What are the clinical signs if a kitten is infected in utero or neonatally

Ataxia, hypermetria, incoordination. The signs persist for life but are not progressive

14

What is the treatment for Panleukopenia

Hospitalization with aggressive supportive treatment. IV fluids, antibiotics, antiemetics antacids

15

How do you prevent Panleukopenia

Disinfection of cages, floors, food and water dishes with bleach. Vaccination

16

What causes feline upper respiratory infection

A complex of viral and bacterial agents. Sneezing nasal congestion and nasal discharge. Herpes virus, calici virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, chlamydia Felis, mycoplasma

17

What family is rhino in

Herpesviridae

18

Describe the structure of the rhinovirus

Envelope dna virus. Latent infection possible

19

Which cats do rhinotracheitis infect

Cats of all ages but mostly kittens. Can also in fact many exotic cats.

20

What does rhinotracheitis cause

Acute upper respiratory tract infection. Very widespread in the cat population

21

What Is the incubation period for rhinotracheitis

2 to 6 days

22

What is the route of infection for the rhinotracheitis virus

Oral, intranasal or conjunctival exposure

23

What is the pathogenesis of the rhinotracheitis virus

Attacks epithelial cells and causes necrosis of the upper respiratory tract and ocular epithelia. Pulmonary involvement is rare. All cats infected become chronic carriers

24

What are the clinical signs of the rhinotracheitis virus

Sneezing, Serous to micro purulent nasal discharge. Turbinate distruction might be permanent and lead to chronic sinusitis. Possible ulcerative keratitis, occasional oral ulcers. Possible anorexia

25

What can happen if kittens under four weeks of age get rhinotracheitis

Can be fatal.

26

What happens if pregnant queens get rhinotracheitis

Can abort or have severe infections in neonates

27

What is the treatment for rhinotracheitis

Frequent cleaning of eyes a nose. IV fluid antibiotics antivirals appetite stimulants nebulization reducing stress

28

What family is the calici virus in

Caliciviridae

29

Describe the structure of the calici virus

Non-envelopes are in a virus. Many different strains of variable degrees of Virulence

30

What is calici virus cause

Common viral respiratory disease of domestic and exotic cats. Highly contagious. Common in multi-cat household and breeding catteries

31

Who's susceptible to the calici virus

Cats of any age but young kittens more susceptible. High morbidity and mortality can reach 30% in young kittens. Prognosis is excellent in older kittens unless severe pneumonia develops

32

What is the incubation period for calici virus

2-6 days

33

What are the three forms of calici virus

Pneumotropic
Rheumatic
Virulent systemic

34

Describe the pneumotropic form of calici virus

Affect the upper respiratory tract and rarely of the lower respiratory tract

35

Describe the rheumatic form of the calici virus

Joint pain and lameness in kittens

36

Describe the Virulent systemic form of calici virus

Severe clinical signs in adults

37

Describe the route of infection for calici virus

Ingestion

38

What is the dessemination of the calici virus

Replication and oropharyngeal tissues. Spreads primarily to epithelium of conjunctiva, nose and oral cavity. Causes rapid cytolysis of infected cells.

39

What are the clinical signs of calicivirus

Anorexia, dehydration, fever, conjunctivitis, oral discharge, blepharospasms, chemosis, ulcers on tongue, dyspnea

40

What is the treatment for calici virus

Clean eyes and nose, supportive treatment if anorexic, antibiotics, ophthalmic antibiotics

41

Describe the transmission for calici virus

Cat to cat contact, virus shed and high amounts and affected cats. Recovered cats can be persistently infected and shed smaller quantities of virus in their saliva

42

How do you prevent calici virus

Isolation, disinfection, vaccination

43

What family does the corona virus belong to

Corona Viridae

44

Describe the structure of the coronavirus

Enveloped RNA virus

45

What can the coronavirus cause

Feeling Coronaviral enteritis, feline infectious peritonitis

46

Describe feline coronal viral enteritis

Mild, self-limiting diarrhea. Transmitted mainly by fecal oral route or through saliva. Can also be transmitted intraplacental. No vaccinations

47

Describe feline infectious peritonitis

Occur sporadically. Chronic debilitating disease. Usually fatal with mortality near hundred percent. In vivo mutation transforms the low Verelint introduced into the aggressive lethal virus. More common in cats six months to two years of age and more common in males

48

Describe the pathogenesis for FIP

FIP virus replicates in the upper respiratory tract. Viruses taken up by the micro fighters and transported throughout the body. Replication of perivascular sites cause nodules and liver spleen lungs etc. lesions also appear in Pericarditis

49

What are the two forms of FIP

Wet form (effusive) and dry form (non effusive). Host immune status determines the pathogenesis and clinical outcome

50

What are the clinical signs for the wet form of FIP

Abdominal distention with ascites, pleural effusion, muffled heart sounds, abdominal masses

51

What are the clinical signs for the dry form of FIP

Uveitis, ataxia, personality changes, seizures, abdominal masses

52

What is the treatment for FIP

Incurable. Wet form will die within two months. Dry form have chronic disease but fatal

53

What family is the feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus part of

Retrovirudae

54

Describe the structure of the retroviruses

Enveloped RNA virus

55

What does leukemia result in

Immunosuppression myelosuppression and neoplasia. Cats under one year more susceptible. Outdoor cats are more at risk. And males are more at risk than females

56

What's the route of infection for feline leukemia

Oral and nasal cavities

57

Describe the dissemination for feline leukemia

Virus replicates an oral pharyngeal lymphoid tissues. Cats can moat a few full immune response on the limited the infection or have an ineffective at me and response and become very manic. Once premier occurs the virus replicates and other lymphoid tissues and bone marrow. Latent infection may be reactivated after stress

58

What are the clinical signs of feline leukemia virus

Anemia, weight loss, anorexia, diarrhea, respiratory distress, liver and kidney disease, lymphoma

59

What's the treatment for feline leukemia cats

No treatment if no clinical signs. Antibiotics, blood transfusion, chemotherapy. Leukemia positive cats can live for several years

60

How is the feline leukemia virus transmitted

Through saliva, can also be transmitted through blood and transplacentally. Mutual grooming, same food and water bowls

61

Who is at risk for the feline immunodeficiency virus

All feelings. Male cats are two times more likely than females. Stray intact adult male cats are at higher risk.

62

Describe the acute phase of the feline immunodeficiency virus

Viral replication and salivary gland, lymph nodes, Simons. Last days to a few weeks. May cause fever and lethargic

63

Describe the clinically latent phase of feeling immunodeficiency virus

Immune system contains but does not eliminate the virus, no clinical signs, cats are transmitting virus through bite and blood, lasts months to several years

64

Describe the terminal phase of feeling immunodeficiency virus

Viral replication overwhelms the immune system. Immune deficiency causes opportunistic infections and neoplasia

65

How is feline immunodeficiency virus transmitted

Cat bites. Through bite wounds and blood contamination. Also transmitted through colostrum