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Flashcards in Viruses and Prions Deck (161)
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121

Picorna-, Calci-, Flavl-, Toga-, Retro-, and Coronaviruses all share which RNA form?

single stranded linear RNA

122

What are the clinical manifestations of rhinovirus? (2)

common cold-major cause of URI in all ages, year round. 2-3 days incubation followed by acute URI symptoms for 3-7 days.

123

What is the morphology of smallpox virus?

large, DNA virus, enveloped

124

What is pathognomic or the most common association with rotavirus? (2)

40-60% of all acute gastroenteritis in children under age two

125

What is the morphology of rabies virus?

RNA, enveloped

126

Which laboratory marker is monitored to determine the course of HIV drug therapy?

hIV PCR/ viral load

127

What virus causes measles?

paramyxovirus

128

How does rabies travel to the CNS?

retrograde migration up nerve axons

129

Name two RNA viruses which do not replicate in the cytoplasm.

influenza virus and retroviruses

130

Who is immune to HIV?

individuals homozygous for CCR5 mutation

131

What are the clinical manifestations of human papilloma virus? (2)

plantar warts-generally asymptomatic but may be painful. Condyloma acuminata (genital warts)-can be benign or preneoplastic (16, 18 and 31)

132

Name the most common opportunistic infections acquired in those human immunodeficiency virus. (5)

pneumocystis pneumonia, tuberculosis, mycobacterium avium-intercellulare, cryptococcal mneingitis and candidiasis

133

Which hepatitis virus types lead to chronic carrier status?

B, C, and D

134

Name the routes of transmission for CMV. (5)

congenital, transfusion, sexual contact, saliva, urine, transplant

135

Yellow fever is transmitted by ____.

the Aedes mosquito (flavivirus)

136

How is human papiloma virus transmitted? (2)

skin to skin contact. STD

137

What lab findings are useful to help diagnose Varicella zoster? (3)

diagnosis based on clinical signs and symptoms; cell culture possible; serological titres can help in diagnosis

138

How is mumps virus transmitted?

respiratory droplets

139

What are the clinical manifestations of polio virus? (2)

gastroenteritis (abortive pollomyelitis)-mild fever with headache, sore throat, damage, reversible or permanent paralysis

140

How is Herpes simplex (I and II) transmitted?

type I-saliva. type II- oral to genital or genital to oral

141

What are the clinical manifestations of rabies virus?

30-50 day incubation varies on proximity of bite to head. Restlessness, malaise and fever then excitement, hypersalivation and excruciating laryngeal and pharyngeal muscle spasms

142

What are the clinical manifestations of rotavirus? (3)

infant diarrhea-1-3 days incubation followed by sudden nausea and vomiting for 1-3 days, then a low fever and frequent watery stools for 5-8 days. Death by dehydration.

143

How is coxsackie viruses transmitted?

fecal oral

144

What are the clinical manifestations of rubivirus (rubella)? (3)

rubella (German Measles)-14-21 day incubation followed by 1-5 days of malaise and lymphadenopathy, followed by 1-3 days of maculopapular rash spreading from face to trunk.

145

What is the morphology of Epstein-Barr virus?

dNA enveloped herpes virus

146

How is rubivirus (rubella) transmitted? (2)

respiratory droplets or transplacentally

147

How is Epstein-Barr transmitted?

human to human (saliva-the kissing disease)

148

What is the pathognomic symptom of measles virus (rubeola)?

koplik's spots on buccal mucosa

149

What are the clinical manifestations of molluscipoxvirus?

molluscum contaglosum-2-8 week incubation followed by painless pearly nodules. Sometimes 'cheesy' matter may be expressed. Self limited, but slow to fade.

150

Mononucleosis is caused by _____.

EBV