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Flashcards in Zoonotic infections Deck (32):
1

What organism is the cause of cat scratch disease

Bartonella henselae

2

What is the morphology of bartonella henselae

slightly curved gram - rods

3

Describe the presentation of cat scratch disease

papules and pustiles around a scratch or bite

non-healing wound

lynphadenopathy proximal to wound

4

What is Parindaud's oculoglandular syndrome

ocular granuloma or conjunctivitis and preauricular
LN’opathy; following inoculation of B. henselae into the conjunctiva

seen in kids

5

Children are more likely to develop complications of B hensalae infection including:

fevers of unknown origin
Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome
encephalitis

6

In addition to CSD, what other syndromes may develop from bartonella hensaleae infection?

bacillary angiomatosis
peliosis hepatis
endocarditis
osteomyelitis
uveitis
persistent fever
breast abscess
neurologic manifestations

7

_____ may transmit bartonella between cats

fleas

8

What drug may be effective in accelerating recovery from symptomatic signs of bartonella infection

azithromycin

9

How can bartonella infection be prevented in humans

avoid rough play with kittens
wash bites/ scratches
flea control
immunocompromised people adopt only seronegative adult cats
vaccination of cats

10

What is the morphology of yersinia pestis

gram negative bipolar rod

11

Where in the US is plague most commonly seen

Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada

12

How is yersinia pestis transmitted?

fleas to rodents to small carnivores

13

List the three clinical forms of plague

1. bubonic: acute febrile lymphadenitis, may see meningitis
2. septicemic: hematogenous spread, leading to shock/ DIC
3. Pneumonic: inhalation as route of infection or hematogenous spread, extremely fatal form

14

Yersinia pestis can easily be mistaken for a ______ on culture/ stain

diplococcus

15

What antibiotics are used to treat infection with Yersinia pestis?

- streptomycin/ gentamici
- tetracyclines/ fluoroqinolones/ chloramphenicol if there is meningitis, pleuritis, myocarditis
- levlofloxacin

susceptible to penicillin and ampicillin in vitro but not in vivo

16

Is there a vaccine for plague?

Yes, for high risk workers and travelers
Formalin inactivated
Also a vaccination for cats but not part of core feline vaccination regimen

17

What is the morphology of tularemia?

Gram negative bipolar rod (not diplococcus)

18

How is tularemia transmitted?

Rabbits and other small mammals-
undercooked game meat
waterborne
ticks and other arthropods

19

List clinical forms of tularemia in humans

ulceroglandular
oculoglandular
exudative pharyngeal form
systemic typhoidal form
pneumonic form

20

How is tularemia treated?

streptomycin, ciprofloxacin, or doxycycline

21

______ is a spirochete with over 250 serovars

leptospira interrogans

22

Leptospires can persist in the ____ of animals without causing disease leading to prolonged shedding

renal tubules

23

____ are the most common source of leptospira infection in humans

rats

others: dogs, livestock, rodents

24

How does human infection with leptospira most commonly occur?

contact with infected water- rice field fever etc

25

List clinical forms of leptospirosis

1. “Weil’s disease” is the
name for the classic hepatic and renal form of disease. After an incubation period of 7-12
days, patients develop fever (biphasic), headache, and “flu-like” illness followed
within a few days by hepatomegaly, jaundice, and renal insufficiency.

2. The less severe, anicteric disease also presents as an initial flu-like illness, but this can be
followed by a second phase of intense headaches, severe myalgia, abdominal pain, and nausea, and sometimes rash, conjunctivitis/uveitis, and conjunctival hemorrhage, aseptic meningitis that is IMMUNE MEDIATED

26

What was unique about the leptospirosis outbreak known as mystery diseas

caused pulmonary hemorrhage with high mortality

27

_______ is a small Gram (-) coccobacillus; facultative intracellular pathogen; survives and replicates in
leukocytes

Brucella

28

What is the major virulence factor of Brucella

LPS

29

How can Brucella be transmitted?

unpasturized dairy
contact with tissues from infected cattle

30

What is the clinical presentation of Brucellosis?

undulating fever, night sweats, headaches, chills, weakness, arthralgia/myalgia, reproductive tract issues

31

How can brucellosis be treated

doxycycline + rifampin

use TMP/SMX in kids to avoid dental staining

32

How should people who accidentally vaccinate themselves with the RB51 brucella vaccine be treated?

3 weeks of doxycycline + rifampin