10.3. - Fractures - Seminar Flashcards Preview

3rd Year - MSK Diseases > 10.3. - Fractures - Seminar > Flashcards

Flashcards in 10.3. - Fractures - Seminar Deck (24):
1

What is a Fracture?

A Break in Structural Continuity of Bone (Crack, Break, Split, Crumpling, Buckle)

2

Why do Bones fail?

1. High Energy Transfer in normal Bones
2. Repetitive Stress in Normal Bones (Stress Fracture)
3. Low Energy Transfer in Abnormal Bones (Osteoporosis, Osteomalacia, Metastatic Tumour etc.)

3

What are the Key points in the Description of a Fracture?

1. Mechanism & Energy of Injury
2. Skin & Soft-Tisue Issues
3. Site
4. Shape
5. Communication
6. Deformity
7. Associated Injuries

4

What are the aims of treating a Fracture?

1. Relieving Pain
2. Restoring Function
(3. Saving Life?)

5

What is the Management plan of an Injured Patient?

1. Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS)
2. Emergency Orthopaedic Management (Day 1)
3. Monitoring of Fracture (Days-Weeks)
4. Rehabilitation + Treatment of Complications (Weeks-Months)

6

What is included in Emergency Orthopaedic Management?

1. Life Saving:
1. a) Reducing a Pelvic Fracture in Haemodynamically Unstable Patients
1. b) Applying Pressure to reduce Haemorrhage from an Open Fracture
2. Complication Saving:
2. a) Early &Complete Diagnosis of the Extent of Injuries
2. b) Diagnosing &Treating the Soft-Tissue Injuries

7

What Soft-Tissue Injuries can occur during a Fracture?

1. Skin - Degloving Injuries . Ischaemic Necrosis
2. Muscles - Crush Injury & Compartment Syndromes
3. Blood Vessels - Vasospasm & Arterial Laceration
4. Nerves - Neurapraxias, Axonotmesis, Neurotmesis
5. Ligaments - Joint Instability & Dislocation
Note - All require urgent treatment, as they will delay healing

8

What does the choice of treatment depend on?

1. The type of Fracture
2. The Bone which has been Fractures
3. Soft-Tissue Injury
4. Patient details
5. Facilities / Abilities of the Surgeon

9

What is the difference of healing pattens between:
1. Soft Tissue?
2. Bone?

1. Soft Tissue heals by replacing the injured tissue with a fibrous Scar
2. Bone heals by Regeneration of Normal Bone Anatomy (forming a Callus) - Very Vascular, a broken bone will always bleed

10

What are the 3 phases of Bone Healing?

1. Inflammatory Phase
2. Reparative Phase
3. Remodelling Phase

11

How do Fractures Heal in Nature?

1. Regeneration vs Repair
2. Phases of Healing by Callus
3. Rapid Process, but Rehabilitation is Slow (Low Risk)

12

How do Fractures Heal with Surgery?

If Rigid - ORIF + Compression:
1. Primary Bone Healing
2. Slow Process but Rehabilitation is Rapid (High Risk)
If Stable - Nailing or External Fixation:
1. Healing by Callus
2. Rapid Process, and Rehabilitation Rapid (Lesser Risk)

13

How is Fracture Healing measured?

1. Clinical Examination:
1.a) Adult - Upper Limb = 6-8 wk; Lower Limb = 12-16 wk
1.b) Child - Upper Limb = 3-4 wk; Lower Limb = 6-8 wk
2. Radiologically (Bridging Callus Formation / Remodelling)
3. Biomechanically (Stiffness)

14

When is a fracture healed?

1. When the patient can bear weight
2. When the X-Rays says so
3. When remodelling is complete

15

What are the Local Problems of a Fracture?

Early:
1. Neurovascular Damage
2. Skin / Wound Problems
3. Compartment Syndrome
Late:
1. Delayed Union / Nonunion
2. Avascular Necrosis

16

What are the Local Complications of a Fracture?

Early: Infection
Late:
1. Malunion
2. CRPS Type 1
3. Implant Failure
4. Joint Stiffness

17

What are the Systemic Problems of a Fracture?

Early:
1. Hypovolaemia
2. Crush Syndrome
3. Fat embolism + ARDS
Late: Psychological & Social Aspects

18

What are the Systemic Complications of a Fracture?

1. Bed Rest Complications (including DVT / PE)
2. Tetanus

19

What factors influence Fracture repair?

1. Host - nutritional & hormonal status / drugs / CNS injury
2. Local Factors - Soft Tissue Injury / Bone Loss / Radiation / Tumour / Distraction / Tissue Interposition / Blood Supply / Infection / Type of Bone / Synovial Fluid
3. Treatment Method - Mobility at fracture site (Stable vs Rigid Fixation)

20

What are the Bony Problems of Fracture Healing?

1. Delayed Union (healing taking longer than average)
2. Non-Union (no further progress towards union)
3. Mal-Union (healed but not in a correct position)
4. Avascular Necrosis (loss of blood supply)

21

What are the 2 types of Non-Union?

1. Atrophic - Gap at the Fracture Site (infection)
2. Hypertrophic - attempt at healing but the fracture is too mobile

22

What are the Treatment Options?

1. Active Early Movement + Protection
2. Rest + Elevation / Gravity
3. Immobilisation by Semi-Rigid Splintage
4. Functional Brace
5. Skin / Skeletal Traction
6. External Fixation
7. Percutaneous K-Wire Fixation +/- ORIF
8. ORIF + Tension Band Wiring / Screws / Plate
9. Internal Fixation + Sliding or Intramedullary Nail / Rod / Screw / Plate
10. Spinal Rods
11. Excision of Fracture Fragment +/- Replacement
12. Amputation

23

What are the problems with treatment (Conservative vs Operative) of Delayed / Non-Union Fractures?

1. Inadequate Immobilisation
2. Distraction of Fracture by Fixation Device / Traction
3. Repeated Manipulations
4. Periosteal Stripping & Soft-Tissue Damage at Operation
5. Anatomical Vascular Susceptibility

24

What score is used to assess the need for Amputation?

Mangles Extremity Severity Score:
1. Skeletal/Soft Tissue Injury - Energy level (Low = 1; Massive Crush = 4)
2. Shock (Normotensive = 1; Prolonged = 2)
3. Ischaemia (None = 0; Advanced = 3
4. Age (<30 = 0; >50 = 2)

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