1.2. Musculoskeletal Growth Injury and Repair - Ligament Injuries Flashcards Preview

3rd Year - MSK Diseases > 1.2. Musculoskeletal Growth Injury and Repair - Ligament Injuries > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1.2. Musculoskeletal Growth Injury and Repair - Ligament Injuries Deck (16):
1

What are Ligaments?

Dense bands of Callagenous Tissue which span across a joint

2

What do Ligaments connect?

Bone to Bone
They are Anchored in to the bone at either end

3

What is the function of Ligaments?

Ensure Joint Stability through a range of motion
Different portions ligament tensioned at different joint positions

4

Which type of Collagen Fibers do Ligaments contain?

Type 1

5

What are the function of the Fibroblasts in Ligaments?

Communication

6

What are the function of Sensory Fibers in Ligaments?

They sense:
1. Proprioception
2. Stretch

7

Where are Vessles of Ligaments found?

On the Surface

8

What is the function of the Crimping Fibers of the Ligament?

They allow for Stretch

9

What is the difference in composition between Ligaments and Tendons?

Ligaments have:
1. Lower percentage of Collagen
2. Higher percentage of Proteoglycans and Water
3. Less organized Collagen Fibers
4. Rounder Fibroblasts

10

When does a Ligament Rupture occur?

When the Force exceeds the Strength of the Ligament. This can be:
1. Expected
2. Unexpected (Position / Muscle)
3. Rate Load

11

What are the 2 types of Ligament Rupture?

1. Complete
2. Incomplete

12

What are the common side effects of Ligament Rupture?

1. Pain
2. Stability Loss in the Joint
3. Proprioception Loss in the Joint

13

How does the Haemorrhage, associated with Ligament Rupture, heal?

1. Blood Clotting occurs
2. This is Resorbed and replaced with a heavy cellular infiltrate
3. There is a Hypertrophic Vascular Response

14

How does the Proliferative Phase, associated with Ligament Rupture, heal?

Production of "Scar Tissue" - disorganised collagenous connective tissue

15

How does the Remodelling Phase, associated with Ligament Rupture, heal?

1. Matrix becomes more Ligament-like
2. There is a major difference in composition, architecture and function which may persist

16

How is a ligament rupture treated?

1. Conservatively: a patient with partial / no instability is a poor candidate for surgery
2. Operative: a patient with instability, expectation (sportsmen) and compulsory (multiple) ligament ruptures are likely to be operated on

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