3.1.3.1 Coasts As Natural systems Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 3.1.3.1 Coasts As Natural systems Deck (19)
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1

What is the key part of the coastal system?

Sediment

2

What type of system is the coastal environment?

OPEN

3

What are the inputs into the coastal system?

Energy from waves, wind, tides and sea currents
Sediment
Geology of the coastline
Sea level change

4

What are the outputs of the coastal system?

Dissipation of wave energy
Accumulation o sediment above the tidal limit
Sediment removed beyond local sediment cells

5

What are the advantages of using a systems approach?

Because it helps explain variations and changes that occur along a coastline
It helps to predict the possible consequences of natural processes or proposed human interventions
Helps to foresee positive or negative impacts and plan for them

6

What is a sediment cell?

A division of coastline of England and Wales that are seen as individual systems

7

How many sediment cells are there in England ad Wales?

11

8

What is an example of negative feedback in a coastal system?

Clif erosion leads to slumping, the mass of collapsed material at the base of the liff will, until its removed by wave action, protect the base of the cliff rom further retreat
The changes within the system reduce the causes of further disruption

9

What is an example of positive feedback in the coastal system?

When a spi extends over a river estuary, reduces he river velocity due to greater friction, this any lead to further spit growth and so yet further reductio in river velocity

10

Why are sediment cells closed sediment systems?

Because within each cel sediment is largely recycle, maintaining a state of releative balance

11

Which sediment cell is Flamborough Head in?

2

12

What is a negative sediment budget?

When outputs exceed inputs, the beach becomes smaller over time

13

What is a positive sediment budget?

When inputs exceed outputs, the beach will extend in height, length or width

14

What are 'sediment sink' destinations?

When sediment is permanently lost to the system

15

What are the zones of a beach?

Offshore
Nearshore
Foreshore
Backshore

16

What is the offshore?

The areas beyond the point where waves cease to impact upon the seabed. Activity is limited to the deposition of sediments

17

What is the nearshore?

The area between the LWM and the point where waves no longer have effect of the land beneath them

18

What is the foreshore?

The area between the HWM and the LWM.
It is the most important zone for marine processes

19

What is the backshore?

The area betweet the HWM and the limit of marine activity. Changes only usually happen here during storms.