4.4 lab - motile cells in blood and ct Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 4.4 lab - motile cells in blood and ct Deck (49)
1

what do platelets look like on LM in a blood smear

dusty bits

2

the dusty bits on an LM blood smear are __

platelets

3

the most numerous formed elements in a blood smear are __

platelets

4

2 classes of leukocytes in a blood smear

granulocytes
(neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils)
agranulocytes
(lymphocytes, monocytes)

5

a dehydrates, star-shaped RBC is said to be __

crenated

6

T/F blood can be thought of as conective tissue with basically no fibrous component (although can easily clot through collaboration between proteins and platelet factors)

true
cells = formed elements
ground substance = plasma

7

what is the "ground substance" of the connective tissue that is blood?

plasma
(water, carrier proteins, fibrous proteins, antibodies, etc)

8

why do we say "formed elements" of blood rather than "cells" ?

because there are many membrane bound structures with no nuclei (RBCs, platelets)

9

why is "red blood cell" technically a misnomer?

RBCs have no nuclei

10

which leukocytes in blood and what are their frequencies?

NeverLetMonkeysEatBananas
neutrophil - 60%
lymphocyte - 30%
monocyte - 5%
eosinophil - 2%
basophil - 1%

11

how many lobes in a neutrophil nucleus

2-5

12

how many lobes in an eosinophil nucleus

2-4

13

how many lobes in a basophil nucleus

2 usually

14

which leukocytes in blood have lobed nuclei?

granulocytes
(neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils)

15

what is the shape of a lymphocyte nucleus?

round and taking up most of cytoplasm

16

what is the shape of a monocyte nucleus?

kidney bean in a larger cell
(kink = cytocentrum = MTOC/centrioles)

17

this is the only leukocyte with a round nucleus

lymphocyte

18

what are two other names for an RBC?

erythrocyte
normocyte

19

normocyte

RBC
erythrocyte

20

basophils (blood only) are similar in function but from different lineages than this motile cell of the connective tissue

mast cell
(like basophil, contains histamine and heparin granules and facilitates allergic response)

21

function of:
neutrophil
eosinophil
basophil
lymphocyte
monocyte

neutrophil - intimicrobial
eosinophil - antihelminthic (parasites), allerg
basophil - histamine, heparine, allerg rspns
lymphocyte - immune response
monocyte - immature macrophage

22

corpus luteum

cells left behind in ovarian follicle after ovulation
-quickly clots from broken blood vessels which functioned in steroid hormone transport

23

cells left behind in ovarian follicle after ovulation
-quickly clots from broken blood vessels which functioned in steroid hormone transport

corpus luteum

24

scar that results from an ovulated follicle

corpus albicans

25

corpus albicans

scar that results from an ovulated follicle
-after corpus luteum clots and scars

26

difference between corpus luteum and corpus albicans?

luteum - clotting, dispersed fibers, RBCs, macrophages, neutrophils
albicans - fibroblasts and dense irreg ct

27

plasmodium falciparum =

the most fatal malarial parasitic protozoan

28

what does malaria look like on a blood smear?

1-5 vesicles or dense dots inside RBCs

29

how can you notice leukocytes prematurely released from the bone marrow in a blood smear, e.g. in the case of leukemia?

abnormally large size and nucleoli evident as light "holes" in nuclei

30

normally what percent of cells in a blood smear are leukocytes?

~1%

31

what kind of a WBC/RBC ratio might indicate pathology?

> 1/100

32

what are two abnormal appearances of RBCs on a blood smear?

crenation (shrunk / starred)
en rouleaux (life savers packing together)

33

en rouleaux

abnormal clumping together of RBCs into life-savers like rolls
(occurs when higher than normal plasma protein concentrations)

34

abnormal clumping together of RBCs into life-savers like rolls (occurs when higher than normal plasma protein concentrations)

en rouleaux

35

when do en rouleaux and crenulated RBC appearances arise?

crenulation - hypertonic solution
en rouleaux - high conc plasma proteins

36

what organs are likely quickest to be compromised in the event of blood pathogen?

spleen - breakdown of blood
liver - metabolism of broken down elements

37

resident cells of connective tissue

fibroblast
unilocular adipocyte
multilocular adipocite

38

what are motile cells of connective tissue

derived from blood cell (hematopoeitic) precursors

39

what motile cells might you find in connective tissue but not in blood?

macrophage (from monocyte)
plasma cell (from B-lymphocite)
mast cell (similar to basophil but round clockface nucleus or round dark nucleus instead of lobed)

40

what motile cells might you find in blood but not connective tissue?

monocyte (immature macrophage)
basophil (similar to mast cell but lobed nucleus)

41

what motile cells might you find in both connective tissue and blood?

neutrophil
eosinophil
lymphocyte

42

how does a mast cell appear?

in connective tissue
granules with
clockface nucleus OR uniformly dark nucleus if already produced all granules (may become relatively quiescent)

43

T/F plasma cells May travel in blood, but primary location is in connective tissue

true
in lymph nodules etc, where it is actively making antibodies

44

what is supravital staining?

stained when organism still alive
-macrophages will try to ingest stain

45

what is one way to stain macrophages specifically?

supravital staining (stain while living)
e.g. with india ink
macrophages will ingest the stain

46

diapedesis

after rolling adhesion, blood cell squeezing through endothelium to connective tissue

47

rolling adhesion

endothelial surface proteins bind blood cells to slow them down for diapedesis (squeezing through to connective tissue)

48

foreign body giant cell

when foreign body is bigger than macrophage, macrophages combine to form foreign body giant cell
-ingest foreign body if possible, if biologically inert FBGCs will wall off the foreign body from the rest of tissue

49

what happens if a foreign body is larger than a macrophage?

macrophages combine to form foreign body giant cell
-ingest foreign body if possible, if biologically inert FBGCs will wall off the foreign body from the rest of tissue