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Flashcards in D Deck (188)
1

dais

raised platform for guests of honor

When he approached the dais, he was greeted by cheers from the people who had come to honor him.

2

dally

trifle with procrastinate

Laertes told Ophelia that Hamlet could only dally with her affections.

3

dank

damp

The walls of the dungeon were dank and slimy.

4

drapper

neat and trim

In "The Odd Couple," Tony Randall played Felix Unger, an excessively dapper soul who could not stand to have a hair out of place.

5

drappled

spotted

The sunlight filtering though the screens created a dappled effect on the wall.

6

daub

smear (as wth paint)

From the way he daubed his paint on the canvas, I could tell he knew nothing of oils.

7

daunt

intimidate

your threats cannot daunt me

8

dauntless

bold

Despite the dangerous nature of the undertaking, the dauntless soldier volunteered for the assignment.

9

dawdle

loiter, waste time

Inasmuch as we must meet a deadline, do not dawdle over this work.

10

deadpan

wooden; impassive

We wanted to see how long he could maintain his deadpan expression.

11

dearth

scarcity

The dearth of skilled labor compelled the employers to open trade schools.

12

debacle

breaking up; downfall

This debacle in the government can only result in anarchy.

13

debauch

corrupt, make intemperate

a vicious newspaper can debauch public ideals

14

debonair

friendly, aiming to please

The debonair youth was liked by all who met him, because of his cheerful and obliging manner.

15

debunk

expose as false, exaggerated, worthless, etc.; ridicule

Pointing out that he conhsistently had voted afainst strenghtening antipollution legislation, reporters debunked the candidate's claim that he was a fervent environmentalist.

16

debutante

yound woman making formal entrance into society

As a debutante, she was often mentioned in the society columns of the newspapers.

17

decadence

decay

The moral decadence of the people was reflected in the lewd literature of the period.

18

decant

pour off gently

Be sure to decant this wine before serving it.

19

deciduous

falling off, as of leaves

The oak is a deciduous tree.

20

decimate

kill, usually one out of ten

We do more to decimate our population in automobile accidents than we do in war.

21

declivity

downward slope

The children loved to ski down the declivity.

22

decollete

having a low-cut neckline

Fashion decrees that evening gowns be decollete this season; bare shoulders are again the vogue.

23

decorum

propriety; seemliness

Shocked by the unruly behavior, the teacher criticized the class for its lack of decorum.

24

decoy

lure or bait

The wild ducks were not fooled by the decoy.

25

decrepitude

state of collagse caused by illness or old age

I was unprepared for the state of decrepitude in which I had found my old friend; he seemed to have aged twenty years in six months.

26

decry

express strong disapproval of ; disparage

The founder of the Children's Defense Fund, Marian Wright Edelman, strongly decries the lack of financial and moral support for children in America today.

27

deducible

derived byreasoning

If we accept your premise, your conclusions are easily deducible.

28

defeatist

resigned to defeat; accepting defeat as a natural outcome

If you maintain your defeatist attitude, you will never succeed.

29

defection

desertion

The children, who had made him an idol, were hurt most by his defection from our cause.

30

deference

courteous regard for another's wish

In deference to his desires, the employers granted him a holiday.

31

defile

pollute; profane

The hoodlums defiled the church with their scurrilous writing.

32

defoliate

destroy leaves

In Vietnam the army made extensive use of chemical agents to defoliate the woodlands.

33

defray

provide ofr the payment of

Her employer offered to defray the costs of her postgraduate education.

34

defrock

to strip a priest or minister of church authority

We knew the minister had violated church regulations, but we had not realized his offense was serious enough to cause him to be defrocked.

35

deft

neat, skillful

The deft waiter uncorked the champagne without spilling a drop.

36

defunct

dead; no longer in use or existence

The lawyers sought to examine the books of the defunct corporation.

37

deify

turn into a god; idolize

Admire the rock star all you want; just don't deify him.

38

deign

condescend

He felt that he would debase himself if he deigned to answer his critics.

39

deleterious

harmful

Workers in nuclear research must avoid the deleterious effects of radioactive substances.

40

deliberate

consider; ponder; unhurried

Offered the new job, she asked for time to deliberate before she made her decision.

41

delirium

mental disorder marked by confusion

The drunkard in his delirium saw strange animals.

42

delta

flat plain of mud or sand between branches of a river

His dissertation discussed the effect of intermittent flooding on the fertility of the Nile delta.

43

delude

deceive

Do not delude yourself into believing that he will relent.

44

deluge

flood; rush

When we advertised the position, we received a deluge of applications.

45

delusive

deceptive; raising vain hopes

Do not raise your hopes on the basis of his delusive promises.

46

delve

dig; investigate

delving into old books and manuscripts is part of a researcher's job

47

demagogue

person who appeals to people's prejudice; false leader

He was accused of being a demogogue because he made promises that aroused futile hopes in his listeners.

48

demean

degrade; humiliate

He felt that he would demean himself if he replied to the scurrilous letter.

49

demeanor

behavior; bearing

His sober demeanor quieted the noisy revelers.

50

demise

death

Upon the demise of the dictator, a bitter dispute about succession to power developed.

51

demotic

pertaining to the people

He lamented the passing of aristocratic society and maintained that a demotic society would lower the nation's standards.

52

demur

delay; object

-----------------------------

grave; serius; coy

To demur at this time will only worsen the already serious situation; now is the time for action.

She was demure and reserved.

53

denigrate

blacken

All attempts to denigrate the character of our late President have failed; the people still love him and cherish his memory.

54

denizen

inhabitant of

Ghosts are denizens of the land of the dead who return to earth.

55

denouement

outcome; final development of the plot of a play or other literary work

The play was childishly written; the denouement was obvious to sophisticated theatergoers as early as the middle of the first act.

56

deplore

regret

Although I deplore the vulgarity of your language, I defend your right to express yourself freely.

57

depose

dethrone; remove form office

The army attempted to depose the king and set up a military government.

58

deposition

testimony under oath

He made his deposition in the judge's chamber.

59

depravity

corruption; wickedness

The depravity of the tyrant's behavior shocked us all.

60

deprecate

express disapproval of; protest against; belittle

A firm believer in old-fashioned courtesy, Miss Post deprecated the modern tendency to address new acquaintances by their first names.

61

deranged

insane

He had to be institutionalized because he was deranged.

62

derelict

neglectful of duty; abandoned

The corporal who fell asleep while on watch was thrown into the guardhouse for being derelic in his duty.

63

deride

scoff at

The people derided his grandiose schemes.

64

derision

ridicule

They greeted his proposal with derision and refused to consider it seriously.

65

derogatory

expressing a low opinion

I resent your derogatory remarks.

66

descry

catch sight of

In the distance, we could barely descry the enemy vessels.

67

desiccate

dry up

A tour of this smokehouse will give you an idea of how the pioneers used to desiccate food in order to preserve it.

68

desolate

rob of joy; lay waste to; forsake

The bandits desolated the countryside, burning farms and carrying off the harvest.

69

desperado

reckless outlaw

Butch Cassidy was a bold desperado with a price on his head.

70

despoil

plunder

If you do not yield, I am afraid the enemy will despoil the countryside.

71

despondent

depressed, gloomy

To the dismay of his parents, he became more and more depondent every day.

72

despotism

tyranny

The people rebelled against the despotism of the king.

73

destitute

extremely poor

The costs of the father's illness left the family destitute.

74

desultory

aimless; haphazard; digressing at random

In prison Malcolm X set himself the task of reading straight through the dictionary; to him reading was purposeful, not desultory.

75

detached

emotionally removed; calm and objective; indifferent

A psychoanalyst must maintain a detached point of view and stay uninvolved with her patients' perssonal lives.

76

determinate

having a fixed order of procedure; invariable

At the royal wedding, the procession of the nobles followed a determinate order of precedence.

77

detraction

slandering; aspersion

He is offended by your frequent detractions of his ability as a leader.

78

devious

going astray; erratic

Your devious behavior in this matter puzzles me since you are usually direct and straightforward.

79

devoid

lacking

He was devoid of any personal desire for gain in his endeavor to secure improvement in the community.

80

devolve

deputize; pass to others

It devolved upon us, the survivors, to arrange peace terms with the enemy.

81

devout

pious

The devout man prayed daily.

82

diadem

crown

The king's diadem was on display at the museum.

83

dialectic

art of debate

I am not skilled in dialectic and therefore, cannot answer your arguments as forcefully as I wish.

84

diaphanous

sheer; transparent

They saw the burglar clearly through the diaphanous curtain.

85

diatribe

bitter scolding; invective

During the lengthy diatribe delivered by his opponent he remained calm and self-controlled.

86

dichotomy

branching into two parts

The dichotomy of our legislative system provides us with many safeguards.

87

dictum

arthoritative and weighty statement

She repeated the statement as though it were the dictum of the most expert worker in the group.

88

die

device for stamping or impressing; mold

In coining pennies, workers at the old mint squeezed sheets of softened copper between two dies.

89

diffidence

shyness

You must overcome your diffidence if you intend to become a salesperson.

90

diffusion

wordiness; spreading in all directions like a gas

Your composition suffers from a diffusion of ideas; try to be more compact.

91

digression

wandering away from the subject

Nobody minded when Professor Renoir's lectures wandered away from their offical theme; his digressions were always more fascinating than the topic of the day.

92

dilate

expand

In the dark, the pupils of your eyes dilate.

93

dilatory

delaying

Your dilatory tactics may compel me to cancel the contract.

94

dilettante

aimless follower of the arts; amateur; dabbler

He was not serious in his painting; he was rather a dilettante.

95

diminution

lessening; reduction in size

The blockaders hoped to achieve victory as soon as the diminution of the enemy's supplies became serious.

96

din

continued loud noise

The din of the jackhammers outside the classroom window drowned out the lecturer's voice.

97

dinghy

small boat (often ship's boat)

In the film Lifeboat, an ill-assorted group of passengers from a sunken ocean liner are marooned at sea in a dinghy.

98

dingy

dull; not fresh; cheerless

Refusing to be depressed by her dingy studio apartment, Bea spent the weekend polishing the floors and windows and hanging bright posters on the walls.

99

dint

means; effort

By dint of much hard work, the volunteers were able to control the raging forest fire.

100

diorama

like-size, three-dimensional scene from nature or history

Because they dramatically pose actual stuffed animals against realistic painted landscapes, the dioramas at the Museum of Natural History particularly impress high school biology students.

101

dire

disastrous

People ignored her dire predictions of an approaching depression.

102

dirge

lament with music

The funeral dirge stirred us to tears.

103

disabuse

correct a false impression; undeceive

I will attempt to diabuse you of your impression of my client's guilt; I know he is innocent.

104

disaffected

disloyal

Once the most loyal of Gorbachev's supporters, Shverdnaze found himself becoming increasingly disaffected.

105

disarray

a disorderly or untidy state

After the New Year's party, the once orderly house was in total disarray.

106

disavowal

denial; disclaiming

His disavowal of his part in the conspiracy was not believed by the jury.

107

disband

dissolve; disperse

The chess club disbanded after its disastrous initial season.

108

disburse

pay out

When you disburse money on the company's behalf, be sure to get a receipt.

109

discernible

distinguishable; perceivable

The ships in the harbor were not discernible in the fog.

110

discerning

mentally quick and observant; having insight

Because he was considered the most discerning member of the firm, he was assigned the most difficult cases.

111

disclaim

disown; renounce claim to

If I grant you this previlege, will you disclaim all other rights?

112

discombobulated

confused; discomposed

The novice square dancer became so discombobulated that he wandered into wrong set.

113

discomfit

put to rout; defeat; disconcert

This ruse will discomfit the enemy.

114

disconcert

confuse; upset; embarrass

The lawyer was disconcerted by the evidence produced by her adversary.

115

disconcolate

sad 

The death of his wife left him disconsolate.

116

discordant

inharmonious; conflicting

She tried to unite the discordant factions.

117

discourse

formal disscussion; conversation

The young Plato was drawn to the Agora to hear the philosophical discourse of Socrates and his followers.

118

discursive

digressing; rambling

They were annoyed and bored by her discursive remarks.

119

disenfranchise

deprive of a civil right

The imposition if the poll tax effectively disenfranchised poor Southern blacks, who lost their right to vote.

120

disgorge

surrender something; efect; vomit

Unwilling to disgorge the cash he had stolen from the pension fund, the embezzler tried to run away.

121

disgruntle

make discontented

The passengers were disgruntled by the numerous delays.

122

disingenuous

not naive, sophisticated

Although he was young, his remarks indicated that he was disingenous.

123

disinter

dig up; unearth

They disinterred the body and held an autopsy.

124

disinterested

unprejudiced The only disinterested person in the room was the judge.

125

dislodge

remove (forcible)

Thrusting her fist up under the choking man's lower ribs, Margaret used the Heimlich maneuver to dislodge the food caught in this throat.

126

dismiss

eliminate from consideration; reject

Believing in John's love for her, she dismissed the notion that he might be unfaithful.

127

disparage

belittle

Do not disparage anyone's contribution; these little gifts add up to large sums.

128

disparate

basically different; unrelated

It is difficult, if not impossible, to organize these disparate elements into a coherent whole.

129

dispatch

speediness; prompt execution; message sent with all due speed

Young Napoleon defeated the enemy with all possible dispatch; he then sent a dispatch to headquarters, informing his commander of the great victory.

130

dispel

scatter; drive away; cause to vanish

The bright sunlight eventually dispelled the morning mist.

131

disport

amuse

The popularity of Florida as a winter resort is constantly increasing; each year, thousands more disport themselves at Miami and Palm Beach.

132

disputatious 

argumentative; fond of argument

People avoided discussing contemporary problems with him because of his disputatious manner.

133

134

disquisition

a formal systematic inquiry; an explanation of the results of a formal inquiry

In his disquisition, he outlined the steps he had taken in reaching his conclusions.

135

dissemble

disguise; pretend

Even though John tried to dissemble his motive for taking modern dance, we all knew there not to dance but to meet girls.

136

disseminate

scatter (like seeds)

The invention of the radio helped propagandists to disseminate their favorite doctrines very easily.

137

dissent

disagree

In a landmark Supreme Court decision, Justice Marshall dissented from the majority opinion.

138

dissident

dissenting; rebellious

In the purge that followed the student demonstrations at Tianamen Square, the government hunted down the dissident students and their supporters.

139

dissimulate

pretend; conceal by feigning

She tried to dissimulate her grief by her exuberant attitude.

140

dissipate

squander

The young man quickly dissipated his inheritance and was soon broke.

141

dissolution

disintegration; looseness in morals

The profligacy and dissolution of life in Caligula's Rome appall some historians.

142

distant

reserved or aloof, cold in manner

His distant greeting made me feel unwelcome from the start.

143

distend

expand;swell out

I can tell when he is under stress by the way the veins distend on his forehead.

144

distll

purify; refine; concentrate

A moonshiner distills mash into whiskey; an epigrammatist distills thoughts into quips.

145

distrait

absentminded

Because of his concentration on the problem, the professor often appeared distrait and unconcerned about routine.

146

distraught

upset; distracted by anxiety

The distraught parents frantically searched the ravine for their lost child.

147

diva

operatic singer; prima donna

Although world famous as a diva, she did not indulge in fits of temerament.

148

diverge

vary; go in different directionsfrom the same point

The spokes of the wheel diverge from the hub.

149

diversion

act of turning aside; pastime

After studying for several hours, he needed a diversion from work.

150

divest

strip; deprive

He was divested of his power to act and could no longer govern.

151

divine

perceive intuitively; foresee the future

Nothing infuriated Tom more than Aunt Polly's ability to divine when he was not telling the truth.

152

divulge

reveal

I will not tell you this news because I am sure you will divulge it prematurely.

153

docket

program asfor trial; book where such entries are made

The case of Smith v. Jones was entered in the docket for July 15.

154

doctrinaire

unable to compromise about points of doctrine; dogmatic; unyielding

Weng had hoped that the student-led democracy movement might bring about change in China, but the repressive response of the doctrinaire hard-liners crushed his dreams of democracy.

155

doddering

shaky; infirm from old age

Although he is not as yet a doddering and senile old man, his ideas and opinions no longer can merit the respect we gave them years ago.

156

doff

take off

A gentleman used to doff his hat to a lady.

157

dogged

determined;stubborn

Les Miserables tells of Inspector Javert's long, dogged pursuit of the criminal Jean Valjean.

158

doggerel

poorverse

Although we find occasional snatches of genuine poetry in her work, most of her writing is mere doggerel.

159

dogmatic

positive; arbitrary

Do not be so dogmatic about that statement; it can be easily refuted.

160

doldrums

blues; listlessness; slack period

Once the excitement of meeting her deadline was over, she found herself in the doldrums.

161

dolorous

sorrowfrl

He found the dolorous lamentations of the bereaved family emotionally disturbing and he left as quickly as he could.

162

dolt

stupid person

I thought I was talking to a mature audience; instead, I find myself addressing a pack of dolts.

163

domineer

rule over tyrannically

Students prefer teachers who guide, not ones who domineer.

164

don

put on

When Clark Kent had to don his Superman outfit, he changed clothes in a convenient phone booth.

165

dormer

window projecting from roof

In remodeling the attic into a bedroom, we decided that we needed to put in dormers to provide sufficient ventilation for the new room.

166

dossier

file of documents on a subject

Ordered by J. Edgar Hoover to investigate the senator, the FBI compiled a complete dossier.

167

dotage

senility

In his dotage, the old man bored us with long tales of events in his childhood.

168

dote

be excessively fond of; show signs of mental decline

Not only grandmothers bore you with stories about their brilliant grandchildren; grandfathers dote on the littel rascals, too.

169

dour

sullen; stubborn

The man was dour abd taciturn.

170

douse

plunge into water; drench; extinguish

They doused each other with hoses and balloons.

171

dowdy

slovenly; untidy

She tried to change her dowdy image by buying a fashionable new wardrobe.

172

downcast

disheartened; sad

Cheerful and optimistic by nature, Beth was never downcast despite the difficulties she faced.

173

drab

dull; lacking color; cheerless

The Dutch woman's drab winter coat contrasted with the distinctive, colorful native costume she wore beneath it.

174

dregs

sediment; worthless residue

David poured the wine carefully to avoid stirring up the dregs.

175

droll

queer and amusing

He was a popular guest because his droll anecdotes were always entertaining.

176

drone

idle person; male bee

Content to let his wife support him, the would-be writer was in reality nothing but a drone.

177

drone

talk dully; buzz or murmur like a bee

On a gorgeous day, who wants to be stuck in a classroom listening to the teacher drone?

178

dross

waste matter; worhtless impurities

Many methods have been devised to separate the valuable metal from the dross.

179

drudgery

menial work

Cinderella's fairy godmother rescued her from a life of drudgery.

180

dubious

doubtful

He has the dubious distinction of being the lowest man in his class.

181

ductility

malleability; flexibility; ability to be drawn out

Copper wire has many industrial uses because of its extreme ductility.

182

dulcet

sweet sounding

The dulcet sounds of the birds at dawn were soon drowned out by the roar of traffic passing our motel.

183

dupe

someone easily fooled

While the gullible Watson often was made a dupe by unscrupulous parties, Sherlock Holmes was far more difficult to fool.

184

deplicity

double-dealing; hypocrisy

People were shocked and dismayed when they learned of his duplicity in this affair, as he had always seemed honest and straightforward.

185

duress

forcible restraint, especially unlawfully

The hostages were held under duress until the prisoners' demands were met.

186

dutiful

respectful; obedient

The dutiful child grew up to be a conscientious adult aware of his civic obligations.

187

dyspeptic

suffering from indigestion

All the talk about rich food made him feel dyspeptic.

188