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Flashcards in E Deck (146)
1

Earthy

unrefined; coarse

His earthy remarks often embarrassed the women in the audience.

2

ebb

recede; lessen

His fortunes began to ebb during the recession.

3

ebullient

showing excitement, overflowing wth enthusiasm

His ebullient nature could not be repressed.

4

eclectic

selective; composed of elements drawn from disparate sources

His style of interior decoration was eclectic: bits and pieces of furnishings from widely divergent periods, strikingly juxtaposed to create a unique color.

5

eddy

swirling current of water, air, etc.

The water in the tide pool was still, except for an occasional eddy.

6

edify

instruct; correct morally

Although his purpose was to edify and not to entertain his audience, many of his listeners were amused and not enlightened.

7

eerie

weird

In that eerie setting, it was easy to believe in ghosts and other supernatural beings.

8

efface

 

rub out

The coin had been handled so many times that its data had been effaced.

9

effectual

efficient

If we are to succeed, we must seek effectual means of securing our goals.

10

effeminate

having womanly traits

His voice was high-pitched and effeminate.

11

effervescence

inner excitement; exuberance

Nothing depressed her for long; her natural effervescence soon reasserted itself.

12

effete

worn out; exhausted; barren

The literature of the age reflected the effete condition of the writers; no new ideas were forthcoming.

13

effluvium

noxious smell

Air pollution has become a serious problem in our major cities; the effluvium and the poisons in the air are hazards to life.

14

effrontery 

shameless boldness

She had the effrontery to insult the guest.

15

effusion

pouring forth

The critics objected to her literary effusion because it was too flowery.

16

effusive

pouring forth; gushing

Her effusive manner of greeting her friends finally began to irritate them.

17

egoism

excessive interest in one's self; belief that one should be interested in one's self rather than in others

His egoism prevented him from seeing the needs of his colleagues.

18

egotism

conceit; vanity

She thought so much of herself that we found her egotism unwarranted and irritating.

19

egregious

notorious; conspicuously bad; shocking

She was an egregious liar; we all knew better than to believe a word she said.

20

egress

exit

Barnum's sign "To the Egress" fooled many people who thought they were going to see an animal and instead found themselves in the street.

21

ejaculation

exclamation

He could not repress an ejaculation of surprise when he heard the news.

22

elaboration

addition of details; intricacy

Tell what happened simply, without any elaboration.

23

elated 

overjoyed; in high spirits

Grinning from ear to ear, Bonnie Blair was clearly elated by her Olympic victory.

24

elegy

poem or song expressing lamentation

On the death of Edward King, Milton composed the elegy "Lycidas."

25

elicit

draw out by discussion

The detectives tried to elicit where he had hidden his loot.

26

ellipsis

omission of words from a text

Sometimes an ellipsis can lead to a dangling modifier, as in the sentence "Once dressed, you should refrigerate the potato salad.

27

elucidate

explain; enlighten

He was called upon to elucidate the disputed points in his article.

28

elysian

relating to paradise; blissful

An afternoon sail on the bay was for her an elysian journey.

29

emaciated

thin and wasted

His long period of starvation had left him emaciated.

30

emancipate

set free

At first, the attempts of the Abolitioninst to emancipate the slaves were unpopular in New England as well as in the South.

31

embargo

ban on commerce or other activity

As a result of the embargo, trade with colonies was at a standstill.

32

embark

commence; go on board a boat; begin a journey

In devoting herself to the study of gorillas, Dian Fossey embarked on a course of action that was to cost her her life.

33

embellish

adorn

My mother-in-law's stories about her journey from Russia made us laugh because she embellished the bare facts of her travels with humourous acecdotes.

34

embezzlement

stealing

The bank teller confessed his embezzlement of the funds.

35

embroil

throw into confusion

He became embroiled in the heated discussion when he tried to arbitrate the dispute.

36

emend

correct, usually a text

The critic emended the book by retranslating several passages.

37

emendation

correction of errors; improvement

Please initial all the emendations you have made in this contract.

38

emetic

substance causing vomiting

The use of an emetic like mustard is useful in cases of poisoning.

39

eminent

high; lofty

After his appointment to this emiment position, he seldom had time for his former friends.

40

emollient

soothing or softening remedy

He applied an emollient to the inflamed area.

41

emolument

salary; compensation

In addition to the emolument this position offers, you must consider the social prestige it carries with it.

42

empirical

based on experience

He distrusted hunches and intuitive flashes; he placed his reliance entirely on empirical data.

43

emulate

rival; imitate

As long as our political leaders emulate the virtues of the great leaders of this country, we shall flourish.

44

enclave

territory enclosed within an alien land

The Vatican is an independent enclave in Italy.

45

encomiastic

praising; eulogistic

Some critics believe that his encomiastic statements about Napoleon were inspired by his desire for material advancement rather than by an honest belief in the Emperor's genius.

46

encomiun

high praise; eulogy

Uneasy with the encomiums expressed by his supporters, Tolkien felt unworthy of such high praise.

47

encroachment

gradual intrusion

The encroachment of the factories upon the neighborhood lowered the value of the real estate.

48

encumber

burden

Some people encumber themselves with too much luggage, when they take short trips.

49

endearment

fond word or act

Your gifts and endearments cannot make me forget your earlier insolence.

50

endemic 

prevailinig among a specific group of people or in a specific are or country

This disease is endemic in this part of the world; more than 80 percent of the population are at one time or another affected by it.

51

endue

provide with some quality; endow

He was endued with a lion's courage.

52

enervate

weaken

She was slow to recover from her illness; even a short walk to the window evervated her.

53

enfranchise

admit to the rights of citizenship (especially the right to vote)

Although blacks were enfranchised shortly after the Civil War, women did not receive the right to vote until 1920.

54

engender

cause, produce

To receive praise for real accomplishments engenders self-confidence in a child.

55

engross

occupy fully

John was so engrossed in his studies that he did not hear his mother call.

56

enmity

ill will; hatred

At Camp David President Carter labored to bring an end to the enmity that prevented Egypt and Israel from living in peace.

57

ennui

boredom

The monotonous routine of hopital life induced a feeling of ennui which made him moody and irritable.

58

enrapture

please intensely

The audience was enraptured by the freshness of the voices and the excellent orchestration.

59

ensconce

settle comfortably

The parents thought that their children were ensconced safely in the private school and decided to leave for Europe.

60

ensue

follow

The evils that ensued were the direct result of the miscalculations of the leaders.

61

enthrall

capture; enslave

From the moment he saw her picture, he was enthralled by her beauty.

62

entice

lure; attract; tempt

She always tried to entice her baby brother into mischief.

63

entomology

study of insects

I found entomology the least interesting part of my course in biology; studying insects bored me.

64

entrance

put under a spell; carry away with emotion

Shafts of sunlight on a wall could entrance her and leave her spellbound.

65

entreat

plead; ask earnestly

She entreated her father to let her stay out till midnight.

66

entree

entrance; a way in

Because of his wealth and social position, he had entree into the most exclusive circles.

67

enunciate

speak distinctly

How will people understand you if you do not enunciate?

68

environ

enclose; surround

Paris was environed by a wall

69

eon

long period of time; an age

It has taken eons for our civilization to develop.

70

epaulet

ornament worn on the shoulder (of a uniform, etc.)

The shoulder loops on Sam Spade's trench coat are the nonmilitary counterparts of the fringed epaulets on George Washington's uniform.

71

ephemeral

short-lived; fleeting

The mayfly is an ephemeral creature.

72

epic

long heroic poem, novel, or similar work of art

Kurosawa's film Seven Samurai is an epic portraying the struggle of seven warriors to destroy a band of robbers.

73

epicure

connoisseur of food and drink

epicures frequent this restaurant because it features exotic wines and dishes.

74

epigram

witty thought or saying, usually short

Poor Richard's epigrams made Benjamin Franklin famous.

75

epilogue

short speech at conclusion of dramatic work

The audience was so disappointed in the play that many did not remain to hear the epilogue.

76

episodic

loosely connected

Though he tried to follow the plot of Gravity's Rainbow, John found the novel too episodic.

77

epistemologist

philosopher who studies the nature of knowledge

"What is more important, a knowledge of nature of the nature of knowledge?" the epistemologist asked the naturalist.

78

epitaph

inscription in memory of a dead person

In his will, he dictated the epitaph he wanted placed on his tombstone.

79

epithet

word or phrase characteristically used to describe a person or thing

So many kings of France were named Charles that modern students need epithets to tell them apart: Charles the Wise, for example, was someone far different from Charles the Fat.

80

epitome

perfect example or embodiment

Singing "I am the very model of a modern Major-General" in The Pirates of Penzance, Major-General Stanley proclaimed himself the epitome of an officer and a gentleman.

81

epoch

period of time

The glacial epoch lasted for thousands of years.

82

equable

tranquil; steady; uniform

After the hot summers and cold winters of New England, he found the climate of the West Indies equable and pleasant.

83

equanimity

calmness of temperament

In his later years, he could look upon the foolishness of the world with equanimity and humor.

84

equestrian

rider on horseback

These paths in the park are reserved for equestrians and their steeds.

85

equine

resembling a horse

His long, bony face had an equine look to it.

86

equinox

period of equal days and nights; the beginning of spring and autumn

The vernal equinox is usually marked by heavy rainstorms.

87

equipoise 

balance; balancing force; equilibrium

The high-wire acrobat used his pole as an equipose to overcome the swaying caused by the wind.

88

equitable

fair; impartial

I am seeking an equitable solution to this dispute, one which will be fair and acceptable to both sides.

89

equity

fairness; justice

Our courts guarantee equity to all.

90

equivocal

doubtful; ambiguous

Macbeth was misled by the equivocal statements of the witches.

91

equivocate

lie; mislead; attempt to conceal the truth

The audience saw through his attempts to equivocate on the subject under discussion and ridiculed his remarks.

92

errant

wandering

Many a charming tale has been written about the knights-errant who helped the weak and punished the guilty during the Age of Chivalry.

93

erratic

odd; unpredictable

Investors become anxious when the stock market appears erratic.

94

erudite

earned; scholarly

His erudite writing was difficult to read because of the many allusions which were unfamiliar to most readers.

95

escapade

prank; flighty conduct

The headmaster could not regard this latest escapade as a boyish joke and expelled the young man.

96

eschew

avoid

He tried to eschew all display of temper.

97

espouse

adopt; support

She was always ready to espouse a worthy cause.

98

estranged

separated; alienated

The estranged wife sought a divorce.

99

ethereal

light; heavenly; fine

Visitors were impressed by her ethereal beauty, her delicate charm.

100

ethnology

study of mankind

Sociology is one aspect of the science of ethnology.

101

ethos 

underlying character of a culture, group, etc.

Seeing how tenderly Spaniards treated her small daughter made author Barbara Kingsolver aware of how greatly children were valued in the Spanish ethos.

102

etymology

study of word parts

A knowledge of etymology can help you on many English tests.

103

eugenic

pertaining to the improvement of race

It is easier to apply eugenic principles to the raising of racehorses or prize cattle than t the development of human beings.

104

eulogistic

praising

To everyone's surprise, the speech was eulogistic rather than critical in tone.

105

eulogy 

praise

All the eulogies of his friends could not remove the sting of the calumny heaped upon him by his enemies.

106

eupherism

mild expression in place of an unpleasant one

The expression "he passed away" is a euphemism for "he died."

107

euphony

sweet sound

Noted for its euphony even when it is spoken, the Italian language is particularly pleasing to the ear when sung.

108

evanescent

fleeting; vanishing

For a brief moment, the entire skyline was bathed in an orange-red hue in the evanescent rays of the sunset.

109

evasive

not frank; eluding

Your evasive answers convinced the judge that you were witholding important evidence.

110

evince

show clearly

When he tried to answer the questions, he evinced his ignorance of the subject matter.

111

evenhanded

impartial; fair

Do men and women receive evenhanded treatment from their teachers, or, as recent studies suggest, do
teachers pay more attention to male students than to females?

112

ewe

female sheep

The flock of sheep was made up of dozens of ewes, together with only a handful of rams.

113

exacting

extremely demanding

The colonies rebelled against the exacting financial claims of the mother country.

114

exalt

raise in rank or dignity; praise

The actor Alec Guinness was exalted to the rank of knighthood by the Queen; he now is known as Sir Alec Guinness.

115

exasperate

vex

Johnny often exasperates his mother with his pranks.

116

exchequer

treasury

He had been Chancellor of the exchequer before his promotion to the office he now holds.

117

excise

cut away; cut out

When you excise the dead and dying limbs of a tree, you not only improve its appearance but also enhance its chances of bearing fruit.

118

excoriate

flay; abrade

These shoes are so ill-fitting that they will excoriate the feet and create blisters.

119

exculpate

clear from blame

He was exculpated of the crime when the real criminal confessed.

120

execrable

very bad

The anecdote was in execrable taste and shocked the audience.

121

execrate

curse; express abhorrence for

The world execrates the memory of Hitler and hopes that genocide will never again be the policy of any nation.

122

exegesis

explanation, especially of biblical passages

I can follow your exegesis of this passage to a limited degree; some of your reasoning eludes me.

123

exertion

effort; expenditure of much physical work

The exertion involved in unscrewing the rusty bolt left her exhausted.

124

exhort

urge

The evangelist will exhort all sinners in his audience to reform.

125

exhume

dig out of the ground; remove from a grave

Because of the rumor that he had been poisoned, his body was exhumed in order that an autopsy might be performed.

126

exigency

urgent situation

In this exigency, we must look for aid from our allies.

127

exiguous

small; minute

Grass grew there, an exiguous outcropping among the rocks.

128

exorcise

drive our evil spirits

By incantation and prayer, the medicine man sought to exorcise the evil spirits that had taken possession of the young warrior.

129

expatiate

talk at length

At this time, please give us a brief resume of your work; we shall permit you to expatiate later

130

expedient

suitable; practical; politic

A pragmatic politician, he was guided by what was expedient rather than by what was ethical.

131

expedite

hasten

We hope you will be able to expedite delivery because of our tight schedule.

132

expiate

ke amends for (a sin)

He tried to expiate his crimes by a full confession to the authorities.

133

expletive

interjection; profane oath

The sergeant's remarks were filled with expletives that offended the new recruits.

134

explostulation

protest; remonstrance

Despite the teacher's scoldings and expostulations, the class remained unruly.

135

expunge

cancel; remove

If you behave, I will expunge this notation from your record.

136

expurgate

clean; remove offensive parts of a book

The editors felt that certain passages in the book had to be expurgated before it could be used in the classroom.

137

extant

still in existence

Although the authorities suppressed the book, many copies are extant and may be purchased at exorbitant
prices.

138

extenuate

weaken; mitigate

It is easier for us to extenuate our own shortcomings than those of others.

139

extol

praise; glorify

The astronauts were extolled as the pioneers of the Space Age.

140

extort

wring from; get money by threats, etc.

The blackmailer extorted money from his victim.

141

extraneous

not essential; external

Do not pad your paper with extraneous matters; stick to essential items only.

142

extrapolation

projection; conjecture

Based on their extrapolation from the results of the primaries on Super Tuesday, the networks predicted that George Bush would be the Republican candidate for the presidency.

143

extricate

free; disentangle

He found that he could not extricate himself from the trap.

144

exude

discharge; gve birth

The maple syrup is obtained from the sap that the trees exude in early spring.

145

exult

rejoice

We exulted when our team won the victory.

146