D. Cross Country Flight Planning Flashcards Preview

ATP Private Pilot > D. Cross Country Flight Planning > Flashcards

Flashcards in D. Cross Country Flight Planning Deck (48)
Loading flashcards...
1
Q

What is true course?

A

The aircraft direction over the ground relative to true north. (uncorrected for variation)

2
Q

How do you determine a magnetic course?

A

True course, corrected for wind to get your true heading, then add for west or subtract for east magnetic variation to get the magnetic heading.

Note: Paine has -16 variation

3
Q

What is true heading?

A

True course corrected for wind.

4
Q

What is magnetic heading?

A

It is your direction relative to magnetic north read from your magnetic compass.

True heading corrected for variation.

5
Q

What is compass heading?

A

Magnetic heading corrected for deviation.

6
Q

How do you determine variation?

A

Isogonic line closest to your course.

7
Q

What is deviation?

A

Error induced in a compass by local magnetic fields of your aircraft.

8
Q

What are isogonic lines?

A

imaginary line on a map joining points on the earth’s surface at which the magnetic declination is the same.

9
Q

What are the special use airspaces? (MCPRAWNTTS)

A

MCPRAWNTTS

Military op. areas
Controlled firing area
Prohibited areas
Restricted areas
Alert
Warning
National security areas
TFR (temporary flight restrictions)
TRSA (terminal Radar Service Area)
SFRA (Special Flight Rules Area)
10
Q

What is a MOA?

A

A military operations area (MOA) is airspace designated outside of Class A airspace, to separate or segregate certain nonhazardous military activities from IFR traffic and to identify for VFR traffic where these activities are conducted.

11
Q

Are you allowed to fly through an MOA

A

Yes you can fly through an active MOA without talking to anyone, however, that is not recommended as military traffic can be hard to see.

12
Q

What is controlled firing area?

A

A controlled firing area (CFA) is established to contain activities, which if not conducted in a controlled environment, would be hazardous to nonparticipating aircraft.

CFAs are not depicted on aeronautical charts because the user terminates the activities when required to prevent endangering nonparticipating aircraft.

13
Q

What is a prohibited area?

A

Airspace of define dimensions identified by an area on the surface within which the flight of A/C is prohibited. Such areas are established for security or other reasons associated with the national welfare

14
Q

What is a restricted area?

A

Areas denoted the existence of unusual, often invisible, hazards to aircraft such as artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles. Penetration of restricted areas without authorization from the using or controlling agency may be extremely hazardous to the aircraft and its occupants.

15
Q

Can you fly through a restricted or a prohibited area?

A

Probably not, but you ask permission from the controlling agency. You probably won’t be approved.

16
Q

What is an alert area?

A

Alert areas are depicted on aeronautical charts to inform nonparticipating pilots of areas that may contain a high volume of pilot training or an unusual type of aerial activity.

17
Q

What are warning areas?

A

Warning area is airspace of defined dimensions, extending from three NM outward from the coast of the US, that contains activity that may be hazardous. (Military)

18
Q

What is National Security Area?

A

Unlike the mandatory nature of prohibited or restricted areas, a national security area simply shows airspace that pilots are requested to avoid. This could be a military installation or a nuclear plant.

19
Q

What are TFRs?

A

TFRs (Temporary Flight Restrictions) are issued for safety or security purposes.

Reasons for issuing a TFR include:

Natural disasters such as wildfires and hurricanes
Certain major sporting events
Emergency or national security situations (presidents)

20
Q

What is a TRSA?

A

TRSA airspace, meaning Terminal Radar Services Area, consists of areas around especially busy class D airports where ATC provides traffic separation with the use of radar.

21
Q

What is SFRA?

A

Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)
Pilots must obtain an advanced clearance from FAA air traffic control to fly within, into, or out of the SFRA.

Note: The Washington, DC Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA) is an area of airspace where the ready identification, location, and control of aircraft is required in the interests of national security.

22
Q

Where can you find information regarding an airports location, number of runway, services, and traffic patterns?

A

The US Chart Supplement

23
Q

Where can you find ATC procedures?

A

Aeronautical Information Manual

24
Q

When do charts expire and how can you tell?

A

They expire every 56 days with the valid period being printed on the cover.

25
Q

What is a road? Secondary Road? Interstate?

A

single gray line, faint single gray line, double gray line.

26
Q

What is a river?

A

Dark blue lines filled with light blue

27
Q

What is a town or congested area?

A

Yellow areas (pop 250K or more), squares 25K-250K, or dots less than 25K

28
Q

What is a lake?

A

Large blue area in the general shape of the real lake

29
Q

What is a railroad track?

A

black line with ticks

30
Q

What is an airport symbol?

A

Magenta (no CT) or blue (CT) circle or runway complex.

Runway patterns will be shown at Airports with at least one hard surface runway 1500’ or greater

31
Q

How can you know if an airport has services?

A

Tick marks

32
Q

Does this airport have runway light?

A

L indicates lights operate from sunset to sunrise *L indicates to check the chart suppl. for runway lights

33
Q

What frequency can be used for traffic advisory?

A

CTAF frequency is shown with a C in a blue circle after the frequency

34
Q

What is the elevation of the airport?

A

First set of numbers on the second line

“285”

35
Q

What is the length of the runway?

A

Shows after elevation in 100’s of feet. Usable lengths might be less

“7200 ft”

36
Q

What is an airway?

A

Light blue or magenta lines prefixed with V and A, T, BR and a number

“V 69”

37
Q

What are the big numbers in the square?

A

Maximum Elevation Figure within the square

“18, 1800 ft MSL” Gives 300 ft of clearance from highest terrain in square

38
Q

What is the minimum alt. you can fly over a wildlife refuge?

A

2,000 AGL

39
Q

Note towers and the MSL and AGL height of the tower?

A

Top is MSL (what you will read) bottom is AGL (how far you will fall)

40
Q

What are VOR’s and how do you identify them on sectional charts?

A

radio nav aids blue hexagon with a dot and an information callout box. A blue triangle is a VORTAC and a hexagon in a box is a VOR-DMS

41
Q

What are NDB and how do you identify them on sectional charts?

A

non-directional radio beacon magenta circled with dots around them. When in a blue box it’s a NDB-DMS

42
Q

What are military training routes?

A

Predefined airways below 10K MSL where military traffic can travel above 250KT.

Typically routes above 1,500 AGL are under IFR and below 1,500 AGL VFR. Routes are shown on a chart as a gray line with IR (IFR) or VR (VFR) and a number along with an arrow in the direction of flight. 4 numbers show routes at or below 1,500 AGL and 3 digit are routes with at least 1 segment above 1,500 AGL

The corridor, in the vast majority of cases is 5 miles on each side or 10 miles wide in total. The military is required to NOTAM the use of a route at least 2h prior to allow civil A/C to de-conflict `

43
Q

What is the CTAF for an airport without a CT that has a FSS station on the field?

A

The FSS advisory frequency is usually the CTAF in this case, but best to always check the Chart Supp.

44
Q

What is absolute altitude?

A

AGL. It is the height above ground.

45
Q

What is true altitude?

A

MSL the height above sea level.

46
Q

How can you determine pressure altitude?

A

Set the alt. to 29.92 or take the current alt. setting and subtract it from 29.92 then multiply by 1000

47
Q

What is indicated airspeed?

A

Airspeed read directly from the airspeed indicator.

48
Q

What is true airspeed?

A

Airspeed corrected for nonstandard temperature and altitude. True airspeed is the speed of your aircraft relative to the air it’s flying through. As you climb, true airspeed is higher than your indicated airspeed.

Note: For every 1000 feet AGL, true airspeed is about 2% higher than indicated airspeed.