DNA viruses- Verma Flashcards Preview

Block 6 Week 4 > DNA viruses- Verma > Flashcards

Flashcards in DNA viruses- Verma Deck (216)
Loading flashcards...
1

What are the three types of enveloped DNA viruses?

pox, herpes, hepadna

2

What are the four types of nake capsid DNA viruses?

polyoma
papilloma
adeno
Parvo (SS)

3

What kind of virus is the human herpes virus?

enveloped DNA virus

4

What are the three types of alpha herpes virus?

VZV
HSV-1
HSV-2

5

What are the three types of beta-herpesvirus?

CMV
HHV-6
HHV-7

6

What are the 2 types of gamma-herpesvirus?

KSHV
EBV

7

What happens after the primary infection of herpesvirus?

you get latent or persisten infection

8

When will you get reactivation of herpesvirus?

during immunosuppresion

9

Both primary herpesvirus infection and reactivations are likely to be more serious in (blank) patients.

immunocompromised

10

Herpesvirus encode their own (blank) which are targets of anti-viral drugs.

DNA polymerase

11

How does herpesvirus enter the cell?

receptor-mediated endocytosis

12

How does herpesvirus replicate?

receptor mediated endocytosis
viral DNA translocates to nucleus
transcription via cellular RNA polymerase
IE-> regulatory
E- enzymes for DNA rep
L-> structural

13

What is the Herpes simplex virus?

HSV-1 and HSV-2

14

HSV-1 and HSV-2 show latency in (blank)

neurons (latency associated with transcripts)

15

How do you know someone has herpes simplex virus 1 versus herpes simplex virus 2?

antigenicity and location of lesions

16

In HSV-1 where will you see lesions?

mouth, eye, skin (above the waist) CNS (encephalitis), disseminate to viscera in immunocompromised people

17

IN HSV-2 where will you see lesions?

vesicular lesions below the waist (especially genitals), CNS (meningitis), neonates and doesnt disseminate to viscera in immunocompromised people

18

What diseases are associated with HSV-1?

gingivostomatosis
herpes labialis (cold sores)
encephalitis

19

Who primarily gets gingivostomatitis?

children

20

What are the symptoms of gingivostomatitis?

fever, irritabiity, and vesciular lesions in the mouth. THe primary disease is more severe than the recurrences

21

What is characteristic of herpes labialis (cold sores)?

reucrrent form-characterized by the crops of vesices at the mucocutaneous junctions of the lips or nose

22

What is characteristic of encephalitis?

necrotic lesion in the temporal lobe. Fever, headache and seizures

23

What are the 2 types of HSV-2 diseases?

genital herpes
neonatal herpes

24

What is characteristic of genital herpes?

painful vesicular lesions on the genitals.
lesions are more severe in primary disease than in recurrences
primary infection present with fever
asymptomatic infections (some people have antibody to HSV-2 but have no history of disease)

25

What is charachteristic of neonatal herpes?

contact with vesicular lesions within the birth cana
varies from severe disease (encephalitis) to milder local lesions (skin, eye, mouth) to asymptomatic infection

26

How is HSV-1 transmitted?
Where do symptoms show?

through saliva
face

27

How is HSV-2 transmitted?
Where do symptoms show?

sexual contact
genital area

28

How can you get HSV-2 in the oral region and HSV-1 on the genitals?

oral-genital sexual practices

29

(blank) percent of people in the US are infected with HSV-1 and (bank) percent have recurrent herpes labialis

50-60%
40%

30

Most primary infections by HSV-1 occur when?

childhood (evidenced by early antibodies)