Exam 2; Trauma from Occlusion-Natural Teeth Flashcards Preview

AU14 Periodontology > Exam 2; Trauma from Occlusion-Natural Teeth > Flashcards

Flashcards in Exam 2; Trauma from Occlusion-Natural Teeth Deck (25):
1

Trauma from occlusion is an injury to what as the result of excessive occlusal forces

attachment apparatus

2

What is primary occlusal trauma

excessive force
normal periodontium

3

What is secondary occlusal trauma

normal or excessive forces
applied to a weak periodontium

4

What are some clinical signs of occlusal trauma

progressive tooth mobility
teeth moving teeth; fremitis, functional mobility
pathological migration
infrabony pockets
buttressing bone

5

What are two possible radiographic signs of occlusal trauma

widened PDL space and/or thickened lamina dura
trabecular bone; hypo or hyper function

6

This condition seen on radiographs, may not be due to occlusal trauma, but do to tooth and bony anatomy and inflammatory periodontal disease

angular bone loss and furcations

7

What is the co-destruction theory

occlusal trauma may be a co-destructive factor that alters the severity and pattern of inflammatory periodontal disease

8

What is the advancing plaque front theory

occlusal trauma has no role in the severity and pattern of inflammatory periodontal disease progression

9

In trauma from occlusion, crushing of tooth against bone causes what

injury to the periodontal ligament at sites of pressure and tension; tipping

10

What are the results of TFO without periodontitis

injury results in acute inflammation
PDL collagen destruction
cementum resorption
bone loss
no attachment loss
adaptation may occur

11

You should not treat occlusal therapy until what

periodontal inflammation is controlled

12

What are three models for role of occlusal trauma

trauma from occlusion without periodontitis
trauma from occlusion with periodontits, but no co-destruction
trauma from occlusion with periodontitis and co-destruction

13

What is meant by co-destruction (of periodontitis and TFO)

the periodontitis merges from the increased tooth mobility

14

If TFO and inflammatory period are separate, what does not occur

there is no enhanced attachmentloss

15

If TFO with increasing mobility and inflammatory perio occur at the same site, what occurs

two lesions merge, there is down growth of pocket epithelium and there is enhanced attachment loss = co-destruction

16

What are four methods of reversible occlusal therapy of TFO

night guard
extracoronal splints
muscle relaxants
muscle exercises

17

What are four methods of irreversible occlusal therapy of TFO

intracoronal splints
occlusal adjustments by selective grinding
orthodontics
orthognathic surgery

18

What are five indications of selective grinding as an occlusal therapy

periodontal occlusal trauma
post-ortho
prior to an extensive treatment
certain TMDs
certain wear patterns

19

What are 5 contraindications of occlusal adjustments

severe malocclusion
non-deal by tolerated occlusion
severe wear
pain
no suitable end point

20

This must be present for attachment loss to occur

periodontitis (inflammation)

21

Occlusal trauma in the absence of period may be what

reversible and may result in adaptation; mobile but otherwise healthy tooth

22

No repair for occlusal trauma unless what

periodontitis is resolved

23

Occlusal trauma superimposed on existing periodontitis may under certain conditions do what

accelerate attachment loss

24

occlusal therapy is especially indicated prior to what

periodontal regenerative therapy

25

Occlusal adjustment is not justified when,

in the absence of periodontal disease as a periodontal disease preventive measure