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Flashcards in fce11 Deck (52):
1

to/in my mind

used to show you are giving your opinion about something SYN in my opinion :
The Internet, to my mind, represents information exchange at its best.

2

same old same old

used to say that a situation or someone's behaviour remains the same, especially when it is boring or annoying 'How's work going?' 'Oh, you know. Same old same old.'

3

chin

He put his elbows on his knees and rested his chin on his fists.

4

fa‧cial 1 / feɪʃ ə l / adjective

on your face or relating to your face :
Victor’s facial expression didn’t change.
facial hair

5

in relation to something formal

used to talk about something that is connected with or compared with the thing you are talking about : Women’s earnings are still low in relation to men’s.
b) formal concerning : latest developments in relation to the disease

6

with/in regard to something formal

relating to a particular subject :
US foreign policy with regard to Cuba

7

communication COLLOCATIONS

COLLOCATIONS
phrases
a means of communication (= a way of exchanging information ) There were no roads and no means of communication with the people in the mountains.
communication + NOUN
communication skills Most managers in business spend some time learning communication skills, so that they and their staff can understand each other.
a communication system The natural communication system for humans is speech.

8

give somebody a dirty look


to look at someone in a very disapproving way :
Susan gave her brother a dirty look.

9

dag‧ger / dæɡə $ -ər / noun [ countable ]

1 a short pointed knife used as a weapon
2 look daggers at somebody informal to look at someone angrily

10

make eyes at somebody/give somebody the eye

informal to look at someone in a way that shows you think they are sexually attractive :
Don’t look now, but that guy over there is really giving you the eye.

11

disguise / dɪsɡaɪz / noun

something that you wear to change your appearance and hide who you are, or the act of wearing this : His disguise didn’t fool anyone.
She wore dark glasses in an absurd attempt at disguise.
2 in disguise a) wearing a disguise :
The woman in the park turned out to be a police officer in disguise.
b) made to seem like something else that is better : ‘Tax reform’ is just a tax increase in disguise.

12

stop to think/stop thinking

stop to think/consider etc
It’s time we stopped to think about our next move. Stop thinking: (Don't think anymore, you're thinking right now and I don't want you to do it)

13

before your very eyes ( also (right) in front of your eyes )

especially spoken if something happens before your very eyes, it happens where you can clearly see it : The murder had apparently taken place before our very eyes.

14

the naked eye

if you can see something with the naked eye, you can see it without using any artificial help such as a TELESCOPE or MICROSCOPE

15

can do something with your eyes shut/closed

to be able to do something very easily :
Believe me, you could run that place with your eyes closed.

16

stick out

Don’t stick your tongue out . It’s rude!

17

dis‧tinct/ dɪstɪŋkt / adjective

clearly different or belonging to a different type : two entirely distinct languages
distinct types/groups/categories etc There are four distinct types.
distinct from :The learning needs of the two groups are quite distinct from each other.

18

de‧rive / dɪraɪv / verb

to get something, especially an advantage or a pleasant feeling, from something
derive something from something
Medically, we will derive great benefit from this technique.
derive pleasure/enjoyment etc
Many students derived enormous satisfaction from the course.

19

pre‧cede AC / prɪsid / verb [ transitive ] formal

to happen or exist before something or someone, or to come before something else in a series → preceding :
a type of cloud that precedes rain
Lunch will be preceded by a short speech from the chairman.
2 to go somewhere before someone else :
The guard preceded them down the corridor.

20

con‧tempt / kəntempt / noun [ uncountable ]

1 a feeling that someone or something is not important and deserves no respect
contempt for
The contempt he felt for his fellow students was obvious.
utter/deep contempt
The report shows utter contempt for women’s judgement.
open/undisguised contempt
She looked at him with undisguised contempt.
The public is treated with contempt by broadcasters.
How could she have loved a man who so clearly held her in contempt ?
beneath contempt :That sort of behaviour is simply beneath contempt (= does not deserve respect or attention ) .

21

wash up phrasal verb

1 British English to wash plates, dishes, knives etc → washing-up
2 American English to wash your hands :
Go wash up before dinner.

22

cry me a river

to tell a moaning person to shut up and that you dont care.
your cat got ran over and your giro is late, Cry me a river love!

23

lane S3 W3 / leɪn / noun [ countable ]

1 a narrow road in the countryside → path : a quiet country lane

24

weekend 1 / wikend◂ wikend $ wikend / noun [ countable ]

at the weekend British English on the weekend American English :
I never work at the weekend.
What are you doing on the weekend?

25

as‧sure / əʃʊə $ əʃʊr / verb [ transitive ]

1 to tell someone that something will definitely happen or is definitely true so that they are less worried SYN reassure
assure somebody that .Her doctor has assured us that she’ll be fine. The document is genuine, I can assure you .
assure somebody of something

26

re‧as‧sure / riəʃʊə $ -ʃʊr / verb

to make someone feel calmer and less worried or frightened about a problem or situation : Teachers reassured anxious parents.
reassure somebody (that)
He tried to reassure me that my mother would be okay.

27

in‧sure / ɪnʃʊə $ -ʃʊr / verb

1 to buy insurance so that you will receive money if something bad happens to you, your family, your possessions etc :
Have you insured the contents of your home?

28

en‧sure / ɪnʃʊə $ -ʃʊr / especially British English ( also insure American English ) verb [ transitive ]

to make certain that something will happen properly SYN make sure :
facilities to ensure the safety of cyclists
ensure (that)
The hospital tries to ensure that people are seen quickly.

29

make sure

In everyday English, people usually say make sure rather than ensure :
Please make sure all the windows are closed.
Make sure is followed by a clause (with or without that ), never a direct object: regulations to ensure their safety ➔ regulations to make sure (that) they are safe

30

get on

CLOTHING get something on to put a piece of clothing on :
I can’t get my boots on!

31

flip the script

1:to lie; to change one's story. : The guy flips the script depending on whose listening.
2:to reverse positions in a situation; to turn the tables on someone. : Now he's the one who's in trouble! That's really flipping the script!

32

con‧vey / kənveɪ / verb [ transitive ]

to communicate or express something, with or without using words :
All this information can be conveyed in a simple diagram.
Ads convey the message that thin is beautiful.
He was sent to convey a message to the UN Secretary General.

33

ruth‧less / ruθləs / adjective

so determined to get what you want that you do not care if you have to hurt other people in order to do it :
a ruthless dictator
They have shown a ruthless disregard for basic human rights.
2 determined and firm when making unpleasant decisions :
He ran the company with ruthless efficiency.
Throw away clothes you don’t wear – be ruthless.

34

well-built adjective

someone who is well-built has a big strong body

35

im‧i‧ta‧tion / ɪmə'teɪʃ ə n◂, ɪmɪteɪʃ ə n◂ / noun

imitation fur/pearls/silk/leather etc (= something that looks like an expensive material but is a copy of it )
an imitation fur coat

36

score verb

win points [ intransitive and transitive ] to win a point in a sport, game, competition, or test :
Great cheers went up when he scored in the final minute of the game.
She scored an average of 9.9 in the test.

37

pric‧ey , pricy / praɪsi / adjective

informal expensive :
The clothes are beautiful but very pricey.

38

sneer 1 / snɪə $ snɪr / verb

to smile or speak in a very unkind way that shows you have no respect for someone or something :
‘Is that your best outfit?’ he sneered.
sneer at
She sneered at Tom’s musical tastes.

39

el‧der‧ly / eldəli $ eldərli / adjective

used as a polite way of saying that someone is old or becoming old :
a well-dressed elderly woman
2 the elderly people who are old :
a retirement village for the elderly

40

par‧rot 1 / pærət / noun [ countable ]

a tropical bird with a curved beak and brightly coloured feathers that can be taught to copy human speech

41

be taken in

to be completely deceived by someone who lies to you :
Don’t be taken in by products claiming to help you lose weight in a week.

42

par‧rot 1 / pærət / noun [ countable ]

1 a tropical bird with a curved beak and brightly coloured feathers that can be taught to copy human speech

43

parrot fashion

British English if you learn something parrot fashion, you repeat what someone has just said without understanding it → by heart :
We recited poems parrot fashion.
→ sick as a parrot at sick 1 ( 10 )

44

parrot fashion

British English if you learn something parrot fashion, you repeat what someone has just said without understanding it → by heart :
We recited poems parrot fashion.
→ sick as a parrot at sick 1 ( 10 )

45

re‧gard‧less / rɪɡɑdləs $ -ɑr- / adverb

without being affected or influenced by something
regardless of
The law requires equal treatment for all, regardless of race, religion, or sex.

46

as regards something

formal relating to a particular subject – use this when you want to talk or write about a particular subject :
As regards a cure for the disease, very few advances have been made.

47

as far as somebody is concerned

spoken used to show what someone’s opinion on a subject is or how it affects them :
As far as Americans are concerned, a lot of our hotels are below average.
As far as I’m concerned, you can forget about it.

48

as far as something is concerned ( also where something is concerned )

spoken used to show which subject or thing you are talking about :
As far as traffic is concerned there are no delays at the moment.

49

as for somebody/something

used when you are starting to talk about someone or something new that is connected with what you were talking about before :
Kitty’s got so thin. And as for Carl, he always seems to be ill.
You can ask the others, but as for myself, I’ll be busy in the office.

50

re‧gard‧ing / rɪɡɑdɪŋ $ -ɑr- / preposition formal

a word used especially in letters or speeches to introduce the subject you are writing or talking about SYN concerning , with regard to :
Regarding your recent inquiry, I have enclosed a copy of our new brochure.

51

with/in regard to something

formal relating to a particular subject :
US foreign policy with regard to Cuba

52

be taken in

to be completely deceived by someone who lies to you :
Don’t be taken in by products claiming to help you lose weight in a week.