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Sap

Undermine
Weaken

1

Rigor

: the difficult and unpleasant conditions or experiences that are associated with something
: the quality or state of being very exact, careful, or strict
Severity, strictness, austerity, rigidity, stiffness
Synonyms: adversity, asperity, hardness, hardship, difficulty

2

Revelry

: a wild and noisy celebration
Synonyms: conviviality, festivity, gaiety (also gayety), jollification, jollity, merriment, rejoicing, reveling (or revelling), merrymaking, whoopee

3

Shun

: to avoid (someone or something)
Escape

4

Assimilate


: to learn (something) so that it is fully understood and can be used
: to cause (a person or group) to become part of a different society, country, etc.
: to adopt the ways of another culture : to fully become part of a different society, country, etc.

1 a : to take in and utilize as nourishment : absorb into the system
b : to take into the mind and thoroughly comprehend
2 a : to make similar
b : to alter by assimilation
c : to absorb into the culture or mores of a population or group
3 : compare, liken

Synonyms: analogize, compare, bracket, equate, liken

5

Exhortation

1 : an act or instance of exhorting (
: to try to influence (someone) by words or advice : to strongly urge (someone) to dosomething
)
2 : language intended to incite and encourage

6

Belabored

: to talk about (something) for too long : to repeat or stress (something) too much or too often
: to attack or criticize (someone)

7

Plumb


: to examine (something) in a careful and complete way in order to understand it
: to experience or reach (something)
: to install pipes for sinks, toilets, etc., in (a building or room)

8

Fathom


: to understand the reason for (something)
Synonyms: sound, plumb

9

Sophomoric

: having or showing a lack of emotional maturity : foolish and immature

10

Grotesque

: very strange or ugly in a way that is not normal or natural
: extremely different from what is expected or usual
Synonyms: grating, harsh, jarring, unaesthetic

11

Minatory

: having a menacing quality : threatening
Synonyms: baleful, dire, direful, doomy, foreboding, ill, ill-boding, inauspicious, menacing, ominous, portentous, sinister, threatening

12

Resolve


: to find an answer or solution to (something) : to settle or solve (something)
To separate
: to make a definite and serious decision to do something
: to make a formal decision about something usually by a vote
Full Definition
transitive verb
1 obsolete : dissolve, melt
2 a : break up, separate ; also : to change by disintegration
b : to reduce by analysis
c : to distinguish between or make independently visible adjacent parts of
d : to separate (a racemic compound or mixture) into the two components
3 : to cause resolution of (a pathological state)
4 a : to deal with successfully : clear up

13

Liquidity

c : smooth and unconstrained in movement
d : articulated without friction and capable of being prolonged like a vowel
4 a : consisting of or capable of ready conversion into cash
b : capable of covering current liabilities quickly with current assets

14

Solvency

: the state of being able to pay debts

15

Usury

: the practice of lending money and requiring the borrower to pay a high amount of interest

16

Incense

: a substance that is used often in religious ceremonies to produce a strong and pleasant smell when it is burned
2 : to arouse the extreme anger or indignation of

17

Insurgency

: a usually violent attempt to take control of a government : a rebellion or uprising

18

Wry

: humorous in a clever and often ironic way
: showing both amusement and a feeling of being tired, annoyed, etc.

19

Diffusion


: to spread out : to move freely throughout a large area
: to exist or be known throughout an area
: to cause (light) to be soft and spread out

20

Sound

: in good condition : solid and strong
: in good health
: free from mistakes : showing good judgment

21

Alacrity

: a quick and cheerful readiness to do something

22

Phlegmatic

: not easily upset, excited, or angered

23

Prize

something taken by force, stratagem, or threat; especially : property lawfully captured at sea in time of war
: given as an award or prize
: winning a prize
: very good or impressive : deserving an award or prize

24

Grating

25

Wooden

: made of wood
: awkward or stiff : not having or showing any emotion, energy, etc.

26

Divest

finance : to sell (something valuable, such as property or stocks)

27

Imbued

: to cause (someone or something) to be deeply affected by a feeling or to have a certain quality
Infused
Endowed

28

Inflated

: filled and made larger with air or gas
: too large or high
of language : too serious or fancy
Synonyms: exaggerated, hyperbolized, bloated, outsize (also outsized), overblown, overdrawn, overweening

29

Deference

: a way of behaving that shows respect for someone or something
Synonyms: acquiescence, biddability, compliancy, compliance, docility, obedience, submissiveness

30

Glacial

: of or relating to glaciers : produced or caused by glaciers
: very cold
: very slow
Synonyms: algid, arctic, bitter, bone-chilling, chill, chilly, coldish, cool, coolish, freezing, frigid, frosty, gelid, cold, ice-cold, icy, nipping, nippy, numbing, polar, shivery, snappy, wintry (also wintery)

31

Claptrap

: words, ideas, etc., that are very foolish or stupid
Rubbish, trash

32

Enshroud

: to cover (something or someone) in a way that makes seeing or understanding difficult

33

Muddles

: to cause confusion in (someone or someone's mind)
: to mix up (something) in a confused way

34

Jarring


: to have a harsh or unpleasant effect on someone or something
: to hit or shake (something) forcefully
: to make (someone) feel uneasy

35

Febrile

medical : including or caused by fever

36

Invulnerable

: impossible to harm, damage, or defeat

37

Awash

: flooded with or covered by water or another liquid
: floating in a large amount of water or another liquid

38

Beholden

: being under obligation for a favor or gift : indebted
Synonyms: bounden [archaic], indebted, obligated, obliged

39

Embolden

: to make (someone) more confident

40

Posterity

: people in the future
Synonyms: fruit, get, issue, offspring, progeny, seed, spawn

41

Soliciting

: to ask for (something, such as money or help) from people, companies, etc.
: to ask (a person or group) for money, help, etc.
: to offer to have sex with (someone) in return for money

1 a : to make petition to : entreat
b : to approach with a request or plea

1 : to make solicitation : importune
2 of a prostitute : to offer to have sexual relations with someone for money
synonyms see ask
Synonyms: interview, poll, canvass, survey

42

Importune


: to ask (someone) for something or to do something in a repeated or annoying way
Synonyms: appeal (to), beseech, besiege, conjure, entreat, impetrate, implore, beg, petition, plead (to), pray, solicit, supplicate

43

Cagey

: not willing to say everything that you know about something
: careful to avoid being trapped or tricked
: very clever

44

Abrogate

: to end or cancel (something) in a formal and official way
: to fail to do what is required by (something, such as a responsibility)
Full Definition
1 : to abolish by authoritative action : annul
2 : to treat as nonexistent
synonyms see nullify

45

Catatonic

characterized by a marked lack of movement, activity, or expression
Examples
a catatonic stare was all that the neglected resident of the nursing home seemed capable of

Synonyms: blank, deadpan, empty, expressionless, impassive, inexpressive, numb, stolid, vacant

46

Misprision

1 a : neglect or wrong performance of official duty
b : concealment of treason or felony by one who is not a participant in the treason or felony
c : seditious conduct against the government or the courts

misunderstanding, misinterpretation
Contempt, scorn

47

Cataract

medical : a condition in which a part of your eye (called the lens) becomes cloudy and you cannot see well
: a large waterfall

48

Alluvion

al·lu·vi·on\ə-ˈlü-vē-ən\
noun
1 : the wash or flow of water against a shore
2 : flood, inundation
3 : alluvium
4 : an accession to land by the gradual addition of matter (as by deposit of alluvium) that then belongs to the owner of the land to which it is added; also : the land so added
Examples
the nonstop torrential rains were threatening to produce an alluvion of biblical proportions
Origin: Latin alluvion-, alluvio, from alluere to flow past, deposit (of water), from ad- + lavere to wash — more at lye.
First use: 1536
Synonyms: flood, bath, cataclysm, cataract, deluge, flood tide, inundation, Niagara, overflow, spate, torrent
Antonyms: drought (also drouth)

49

Cloddish (clod)

: a lump of dirt or clay
: a person who is stupid and dull
Synonyms: oaf, clodhopper, gawk, hulk, lout, lubber, lug, lump, Neanderthal, palooka

50

Neanderthal

: a type of early human being that existed very long ago in Europe
: a man who is stupid and rude
: a person who has very old-fashioned ideas and who does not like change

51

Oaf

: a stupid or awkward person

52

Lout

Loutish- : resembling or befitting a lout
synonyms see boorish
Lout - 1 : to bow in respect
2 : submit, yield
3 scorn

53

Ornery

: easily annoyed or angered
: difficult to deal with or control
Full Definition
: having an irritable disposition : cantankerous
Synonyms: acid, bearish, bilious, bloody-minded [chiefly British], cantankerous, disagreeable, dyspeptic, ill-humored, ill-natured, ill–tempered, splenetic, surly

54

Outrider

1 : a mounted attendant
2 : one who escorts or clears the way for a vehicle or person
3 : forerunner, harbinger

55

Forego

: to go before : precede
Harbinger, precursor

56

Plaudit

1 : an act or round of applause
2 : enthusiastic approval — usually used in plural
Synonyms: acclamation, cheer, cheering, ovation, plaudit(s), rave(s), réclame

57

Truism

: a true statement that is very commonly heard : a common statement that is obviously true
Synonyms: banality, bromide, chestnut, cliché (also cliche), groaner, homily, platitude, shibboleth, trope, commonplace

58

Debauch

b : to seduce from chastity
2 a : to lead away from virtue or excellence
b : to corrupt by intemperance or sensuality
synonyms see debase
de·bauch·er noun

59

Vitiate

: to make (something) less effective : to ruin or spoil (something)
1 : to make faulty or defective : impair
synonyms see debase

60

Derogate

: to insult (someone or something) : to say or suggest that (something or someone) is not important or worthy of respect
Synonyms: bad-mouth, belittle, cry down, denigrate, deprecate, depreciate, decry, diminish, dis (also diss) [slang], discount, dismiss, disparage, kiss off, minimize, play down, poor-mouth, put down, run down, talk down, trash, trash-talk, vilipend, write off

61

Bedizen

: to dress or adorn gaudily

62

Irate

: very angry
Full Definition
1 : roused to ire
2 : arising from anger
Synonyms: angered, apoplectic, ballistic, cheesed off [chiefly British], choleric, enraged, foaming, fuming, furious, hopping, horn-mad, hot, incensed, indignant, inflamed (also enflamed), infuriate, infuriated, angry, ireful, livid, mad, outraged, rabid, rankled, riled, riley, roiled, shirty [chiefly British], sore, steamed up, steaming, teed off, ticked, wrathful, wroth

63

Dionysian (Bacchus)

: the Greek god of wine —called also Dionysus
Frenzied and orgiastic ( marked by unrestrained emotion)

64

Protean

: able to change into many different forms or able to do many different things
Full Definition
1 : of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume different forms
2 : displaying great diversity or variety : versatile
Examples
a protean actor who is equally comfortable with light comedy and serious drama
First use: 1598
Synonyms: adaptable, all-around (also all-round), versatile, universal

65

Arcadian

1 a : of or relating to Arcadia or the Arcadians
b : of or relating to Arcadian
2 : idyllically pastoral; especially : idyllically innocent, simple, or untroubled
Examples
the painter is fond of depicting mute, slightly mysterious figures in arcadian settings
First use: 1565
Synonyms: quiet, calm, hushed, peaceful, placid, restful, serene, still, stilly, tranquil

66

Penumbra

Synonyms: dusk, shade, shadiness, shadow, umbra, shroud, fringe

67

Hinterland

: an area that is not close to any cities or towns : a remote region
Synonyms: backcountry, backland(s), backwater, backwoods, bush, frontier, outback, outlands, up-country

68

Apollonian

1 : of, relating to, or resembling the god Apollo
2 : harmonious, measured, ordered, or balanced in character — compare dionysian

69

Tony

: very expensive and fashionable
: marked by an aristocratic or high-toned manner or style

70

Spartan

1 : a native or inhabitant of ancient Sparta
2 : a person of great courage and self-discipline

71

Contraband

: things that are brought into or out of a country illegally
Full Definition
1 : illegal or prohibited traffic in goods : smuggling
2 : goods or merchandise whose importation, exportation, or possession is forbidden; also : smuggled goods
3 : a slave who during the American Civil War escaped to or was brought within the Union lines
contraband adjective
Origin: Italian contrabbando, from Medieval Latin contrabannum, from contra- + bannus, bannum decree, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German bannan to command — more at ban.

72

Aurora

1 : dawn
2 capitalized : the Roman goddess of dawn — compare eos
3 : a luminous phenomenon that consists of streamers or arches of light appearing in the upper atmosphere of a planet's magnetic polar regions and is caused by the emission of light from atoms excited by electrons accelerated along the planet's magnetic field lines
Other forms: plural auroras or au·ro·rae\-(ˌ)ē\
au·ro·ral \-əl\ adjective
au·ro·re·an \-ē-ən\ adjective
Examples
a gorgeous pink aurora aroused us out of our slumber
Origin: Latin — more at east.
First use: 14th century
Synonyms: dawn, cockcrow, dawning, day, daybreak, daylight, light, morn, morning, sun, sunrise, sunup
Antonyms: nightfall, sundown, sunset

73

Pantheon

: the gods of a particular country or group of people
: a group of people who are famous or important
: a temple that is built to honor all the gods of a particular country or group of people
Full Definition
1 : a temple dedicated to all the gods
2 : a building serving as the burial place of or containing memorials to the famous dead of a nation
3 : the gods of a people; especially : the officially recognized gods
4 : a group of illustrious or notable persons or things
Origin: Middle English Panteon, a temple at Rome, from Latin Pantheon, from Greek pantheion temple of all the gods, from neuter of pantheios of all gods, from pan- + theos god.

74

Myrmidon

myr·mi·don\ˈmər-mə-ˌdän, -dən\
noun
1 capitalized : a member of a legendary Thessalian people who accompanied their king Achilles in the Trojan War
2 : a loyal follower; especially : a subordinate who executes orders unquestioningly or unscrupulously
Origin: Middle English Mirmydon, Latin Myrmidon-, Myrmido, from Greek Myrmidōn.
First use: 15th century

75

Rapscallions

: rascal, ne'er-do-well
Examples
the city's run-down waterfront was occupied mostly by disreputable places frequented by drunkards and rapscallions
that little rapscallion kept hiding my shoes and making me go look for them
Origin: alteration of earlier rascallion, irregular from rascal.
First use: 1699
Synonyms: baddie (or baddy), beast, brute, caitiff, devil, evildoer, fiend, heavy, hound, knave, meanie (also meany), miscreant, monster, nazi, no-good, villain, rascal, reprobate, rogue, savage, scalawag (or scallywag), scamp, scapegrace, scoundrel, varlet, wretch

76

Defector

: to leave a country, political party, organization, etc., and go to a different one that is a competitor or an enemy
Full Definition
1 : to forsake one cause, party, or nation for another often because of a change in ideology
2 : to leave one situation (as a job) often to go over to a rival
de·fec·tor \-ˈfek-tər\ noun
Origin: Latin defectus, past participle of deficere.

77

Quisling

: a person who helps an enemy that has taken control of his or her country
Full Definition
Usage: often attributive
: traitor 2, collaborator
quis·ling·ism \-liŋ-ˌi-zəm\ noun
Examples
warned that all quislings would be punished without mercy
Origin: Vidkun Quisling †1945 Norwegian politician who collaborated with the Nazis.
First use: 1940
Synonyms: apostate, backstabber, betrayer, double-crosser, double-dealer, Judas, traitor, recreant, serpent, snake, turncoat

78

Painstaking

: the action of taking pains : diligent care and effort
First use: 1538
2painstaking
adjective
: showing or done with great care and effort
Full Definition
: taking pains : expending, showing, or involving diligent care and effort
pains·tak·ing·ly \-kiŋ-lē\ adverb
First use: 1696
Synonyms: careful, conscientious, fussy, loving, meticulous, scrupulous

79

Excruciating

excruciating
adjective
: very painful : causing great mental or physical pain
: very severe
: extreme or excessive
Full Definition
1 : causing great pain or anguish : agonizing adverb
Examples
those who publicly disagreed with the government were subjected to excruciating torture
the excruciating heat that the settlers faced as they crossed the deserts of the Southwest
most excruciating of all was the endless wait for news of any survivors of the plane crash
First use: 1599
Synonyms: agonizing, harrowing, racking, raging, tormenting, torturing, torturous, wrenching
Antonyms: easy, light, soft

80

Dissolute

—used to describe someone (such as a person who often gets drunk) whose way of living is considered morally wrong
Full Definition
: lacking restraint; especially : marked by indulgence in things (as drink or promiscuous sex) deemed vices
dis·so·lute·ly adverb
dis·so·lute·ness noun
Examples
literature dealing with the dissolute and degrading aspects of human experience
Origin: Middle English, from Latin dissolutus, from past participle of dissolvere to loosen, dissolve.
First use: 14th century
Synonyms: debased, debauched, decadent, degenerate, degraded, demoralized, depraved, dissipated, corrupt, jackleg, libertine, loose, perverse, perverted, rakehell (or rakehelly), rakish, reprobate, sick, unclean, unwholesome, warped
Antonyms: pure, uncorrupt, uncorrupted

81

Adjudicator


: to make an official decision about who is right in a dispute
Full Definition
transitive verb
: to settle judiciallyintransitive verb
: to act as judge
Other forms: ad·ju·di·cat·ed; ad·ju·di·cat·ing
ad·ju·di·ca·tive \-ˌkā-tiv, -kə-\ adjective
ad·ju·di·ca·tor \-ˌkā-tər\ noun
ad·ju·di·ca·to·ry \-ˈjü-di-kə-ˌtȯr-ē\ adjective
Examples
when we asked the salesclerk to adjudicate our disagreement, she agreed with me that the white shoes looked better
First use: 1775
Synonyms: adjudge, judge, arbitrate, decide, determine, referee, rule (on), settle, umpire

82

Solipsistic

: a theory in philosophy that your own existence is the only thing that is real or that can be known

83

Myopia or myopic

my·o·pia\mī-ˈō-pē-ə\
noun
medical : a condition of the eye that makes it difficult to see objects that are far away
Full Definition
1 : a condition in which the visual images come to a focus in front of the retina of the eye resulting especially in defective vision of distant objects
2 : a lack of foresight or discernment : a narrow view of something
my·o·pic \-ˈō-pik, -ˈä-\ adjective
my·o·pi·cal·ly \-pi-k(ə-)lē\ adverb
Origin: New Latin, from Greek myōpia, from myōp-, myōps.
First use: circa 1752

84

Anemic

medical : relating to or suffering from anemia
: not strong, forceful, or impressive
Full Definition
1 : relating to or affected with anemia
2 a : lacking force, vitality, or spirit
b : lacking interest or savor : insipid
c : lacking in substance or quantity
ane·mi·cal·ly \-mi-k(ə-)lē\ adverb

85

Botch

: an inflammatory sore
Examples
The store botched the order—I received only half the books I paid for.
They clearly botched the investigation.
a botched robbery/experiment
Origin: Middle English boche, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *bottia boss.
First use: 14th century
2botch
transitive verb
: to do (something) badly : to ruin (something) because of carelessness or a lack of skill
Full Definition
1 : to foul up hopelessly — often used with up
2 : to put together in a makeshift way
botch·er noun
Origin: Middle English bocchen.
First use: 1530
3botch
noun
1 : something that is botched : mess
2 : patchwork, hodgepodge
botchy \ˈbä-chē\ adjective

86

Titular

87

Ecclesiastical

: of or relating to the Christian church or clergy
Full Definition
1 : of or relating to a church especially as an established institution
2 : suitable for use in a church
ec·cle·si·as·ti·cal·ly \-ti-k(ə-)lē\ adverb
Examples
ecclesiastical laws that have been in existence for centuries
Origin: Middle English, from Late Latin ecclesiasticus, from Late Greek ekklēsiastikos, from Greek, of an assembly of citizens, from ekklēsiastēs.
First use: 15th century
Synonyms: churchly, ecclesial, ecclesiastic
Antonyms: nonchurch, nonecclesiastical

88

Fissile

fis·sile\ˈfi-səl, ˈfi-ˌsī(-ə)l\
adjective
1 : capable of being split or divided in the direction of the grain or along natural planes of cleavage
2 : capable of undergoing fission
fis·sil·i·ty \fi-ˈsi-lə-tē\ noun
Origin: Latin fissilis, from findere.
First use: 1661

89

Eupeptic

1 : of, relating to, or having good digestion
2 : cheerful, optimistic
Examples
our eupeptic colleague was unfazed by our gloomy expressions and dire predictions
First use: 1699
Synonyms: blithe, blithesome, bright, buoyant, canty [British dialect], cheery, chipper, cheerful, gay, gladsome, lightsome, sunny, upbeat, winsome

90

Prune

: to reduce (something) by removing parts that are not necessary or wanted

91

Faux-naïf

: spuriously or affectedly childlike : artfully simple
Variants: or faux–na·if \ˌfō-nä-ˈēf\
Origin: French, literally, falsely naive.
First use: 1948

92

No-holds-barred

93

Dyed-in-the-wool

94

Inveterate

: always or often doing something specified
: always or often happening or existing
Full Definition
1 : firmly established by long persistence
2 : confirmed in a habit : habitual
in·vet·er·ate·ly adverb
Examples
he has an inveterate tendency to tell some very tall tales
the man is an inveterate liar who only rarely tells the truth
Origin: Middle English, from Latin inveteratus, from past participle of inveterare to age (v.t.), from in- + veter-, vetus old — more at wether.
First use: 14th century
Synonyms: bred-in-the-bone, confirmed, deep, deep-rooted, deep-seated, entrenched (also intrenched), hard-core, rooted, settled

95

Stonewall

stone·wall\ˈstōn-ˌwȯl\
: to refuse or fail to answer questions, to do what has been requested, etc., especially in order to delay or prevent something ( chiefly US)
Full Definition
intransitive verb
1 chiefly British : to engage in obstructive parliamentary debate or delaying tactics
2 : to be uncooperative, obstructive, or evasivetransitive verb
: to refuse to comply or cooperate with
stone·wall·er noun
First use: 1880

96

Storied

97

Prudish

: the behavior or thinking of people who are too easily shocked or offended : prudish behavior or attitudes
Full Definition
1 : the characteristic quality or state of a prude
2 : a prudish act or remark
Other forms: plural prud·er·ies
Examples
such prudery regarding artistic depictions of the nude has no place on a college campus
First use: 1709
Synonyms: moralism, nice-nellyism, prudishness, puritanism,priggish

98

Deft

: skillful and clever
: able to do something quickly and accurately
Full Definition
: characterized by facility and skill
synonyms see dexterous
deft·ly adverb
deft·ness \ˈdef(t)-nəs\ noun
Examples
a deft politician
The photographer is known for her deft use of lighting.
the trumpeter's deft fingers
Origin: Middle English defte gentle — more at daft.
First use: 15th century
Synonyms: adroit, artful, bravura, skillful, delicate, dexterous (also dextrous), expert, masterful, masterly, practiced (also practised), virtuoso, workmanlike

99

Effete

100

Whet

: to make (something, such as a person's appetite or curiosity) sharper or stronger
Full Definition
1 : to sharpen by rubbing on or with something (as a stone)
2 : to make keen or more acute : excite, stimulate
Other forms: whet·ted; whet·ting
whet·ter noun
Origin: Middle English whetten, from Old English hwettan; akin to Old High German wezzen to whet, waz sharp.
First use: before 12th century
2whet
noun
1 dialect
a : a spell of work done with a scythe between the time it is sharpened and the time it needs to be sharpened again
b : time, while
2 : something that sharpens or makes keen:
a : goad, incitement
b : appetizer; also : a drink of liquor

101

Accrue


: to increase in value or amount gradually as time passes : to grow or build up slowly
: to come to or be given to someone
Full Definition
intransitive verb
1 : to come into existence as a legally enforceable claim
2 a : to come about as a natural growth, increase, or advantage
b : to come as a direct result of some state or action

102

Tout


: to talk about (something or someone) as being very good, effective, skillful, etc.
: to try to persuade people to buy your goods or services
: to buy tickets for an event and resell them at a much higher price