Grammar Chp. 3 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Grammar Chp. 3 Deck (17):
1

Define the subject

The person or thing that performs the action

2

Define the object

The person or thing toward whom the action is directed

3

Verbs end in which 3 endings

At, et, it

4

Masculine nominative

Us

5

Masculine accusatory

Um

6

Feminine nominative

A

7

Female accusatory

Am

8

Intransitive verbs

Verbs that do not have an object that is a victim of their action: such as sleeping.

9

Transitive verbs

Verbs who have an object, transit to the object an action or something

10

Masculine accusatory pronouns in third person, second person, and first person

Eum, tu, me

These pronouns can take the place a noun with an accusatory ending such as "Marcum"

11

Feminine accusatory pronouns in third, second and first person

Eam, tu, me

These pronouns can take the place of a noun with an accusatory ending such as "Iuliam"

12

What is a relative pronoun and examples of its use

A relative pronoun refers back to the noun of a sentence.

An example in English: Marcus, who is the head chef, likes to snowboard (who is the relative pronoun)

In Latin: iulius, qui est vir romanus, est pater Marci (qui is the relative pronoun)

13

Relative masculine pronouns for nominative and accusatory

Nom: qui
Acc: Quem

14

Relative pronouns feminine both accusatory and nominative

Nom: quae
Acc: quam

15

Relative pronouns neuter both nominative and accusatory

Quod and quod

16

What is the difference between a transitive and intransitive verb?

A transitive verb has an object; it is an action directed towards a noun. An intransitive verb has no object; it is an action that is simple done, such as sleeping.

17

Interrogative verbs; how do you say "why" and "because" in Latin

Cur And quia.