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Flashcards in Grammatical ablatives Deck (12):
1

Locative (uses ablative)

indicates where something or somebody is

e.g. "Marcus in Roma est"

2

Ablative of personal agent

name of the person by whom the action is performed or committed. The agent is a PERSON, NOT a thing or animal.

3

Ablative of means/instrument

when an action is preformed by something other than a person--such as an animal, or an inanimate thing. In this case, the source of the action does NOT go with a preposition.

4

Ablative of price

generally associated with verbs like "emit" "vendit" "constat"
THE PRICE OF SOMETHING ALWAYS GOES IN THE ABLATIVE

5

Ablative of Respect

Denotes in what way, or in what respect.

e.g. "Nec modo pede, sed etiam capite aeger est." Here "capite" is in the ablative answering the quesiton "in what way is he sick?"
Quintus is sick "in his foot"

6

Ablative of Time When

Dates are given in the ablativus temporis

e.g. "kalendis ianuariis" -> "on january 1st"

7

Ablative in expression of time and space

denotes "Where?"
e.g. Dies est dum sol in caelo est

denotes "When? During what time?"
e.g. Aestate dies longi sunt, sol lucet, aer calidus est.

8

Ablative of Attendant Circumstances

Demonstrates the conditions surrounding a verb
e.g. "Marcus fenestra aperta dormit." -> "Marcus sleeps with the window open." The "with the window" describes or demonstrates the conditions surrounding the verb "dormit"

9

Ablative of Degree of Difference

the ablative of "multum" and "paulum", which serves to strengthen comparative verbs. So it furthers the comparative adjectives by denoting "by how much more, or by how much less"
e.g. "Naves levior paulo fit" the ship is lighter by a small amount

10

Ablative Absolute

The ablative case used in an adverbial phrase. Such an adverbial phrase can be independent of the rest of the sentence.
It represents the circumstances occurring around an action.
Gives further information about the verb.
e.g. "Vento secundo naves e portu egrediuntur"
"Vento secundo" is the adverbial phrase, meaning "When the second wind" which gives more information about the verb."

11

Ablative of exclamation

Used when exclaiming about the specific group of people or things before you, as oppose to in general. When exclaiming in general, the Accusative absolute is used.

12

Ablative of Separation

Denotes the separation between two things, more specifically, the place from where something is coming.

e.g. "Tusculo venit." -> He is coming from Tusculum.