Histology Cartilage (Lect) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Histology Cartilage (Lect) Deck (73)
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1

Where can hyaline cartilage be found?

-Fetal Skeleton
-Articular surfaces of bones
-ventral ends of ribs
-some cartilages of larynx
-tracheal and bronchial rings
-nose

2

What type of collagen is found in all cartilages?

type II collagen

3

T or F: the hyaline matrix is rigid, tough, and resistant to tearing?

T

4

What direction do the collagen fibrils run in hyaline cartilage?

all directions

5

Can you see the collagen in hyaline cartilage?

No, because they are small and have the same refractive index as the ground substance

6

What makes hyaline cartilage?

Chondrocytes

7

What is the consistency of the ground substance in hyaline cartilage?

firm, could be cut with a knife

8

What is the ground substance made of in hyaline cartilage>

hylauronic acid
proteoglycans (containing keratan sulfate)
Chrodriotin sulfate glycosaminoglycans
multiadhesive glycoproteins (Chondronectin)

9

What color do the territorial/capsular and interterritorial matrices appear on slides?

Territorial - dark purple
Interterritorial - light purple

10

What type of protein chains are found in type II collagen?

3 alpha chains

11

What limits the size of type II collagen in hyaline cartilage?

type IX collagen binding to their surface

12

What happens to the most superficial layer of type II collagen fibrils in hyaline tissue?

they align in the direction of the stress

13

What is the orientation of the deep layer collagen fibrils in hyaline cartilage?

Perpendicular to the underlying bone layer

14

What is the relative size of type II collagen fibrils to type I?

type II is much smaller

15

Why can the immune system not see antigens on chondrocytes?

the dense matrix molecules block large molecules like antibodies

16

What is the implication of the immune system not being able to see the antigens on chondrocytes?

For grafts the donors do not have to be matched

17

How are proteoglycan monomers linked to the hyaluronic acid tubes?

By linker proteins which bind the two together through a non-covalent link

18

What does GAG stand for?

glycoaminoglycans

19

Where are GAGs found?

The spindles sticking off the proteoglycan monomers that are bound to hyaluronic acid

20

What charge to GAG chains have?

negative

21

What binds to the GAG chains?

water and counterions

22

What happens to GAGs in compression of hyaline cartilage?

water and counterions are forces out of the tisses and release of the force lets these things back in, tissue springs back into place as a result of repulsion of negative charges

23

What limits expansion of hyaline cartilage?

collagen fibrils

24

What are GAGs composed of?

repeating disaccharid units

25

What happens when proteoglycans are degraded by enzymes?

there is a loss of cartilage and joint function

26

What are examples of synovial joint molecules that are highly hydrated to act as lubricants?

hyalurnan, lubricin, aggrecan

27

What lubricant is the primary joint lubricant made by chondrocytes and synovial cells?

lubricin

28

What type of cartilage will be found in an area where tissue is subject to compression and tension?

fibrocartilage

29

What are some examples of fibrocartilage in the body?

meniscal cartilages
intervertebral disks
symphysis pubis
ligamentum teres of femur

30

Characterize the structure/arrangment of condrocytes fibrocartilage

small linear groups, little isogenous clusters or single cell in lacunae