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1

What is aphasia?

a language disability which occurs some time after an individual has completely developed competent language skills

2

How does aphasia present itself?

from neurological damage to the language-dominant hemisphere (major hemisphere), usually the left

3

What includes disturbances of receptive and/or expressive skills, verbally or in written language (and in sign language)

aphasia

4

What are the three causes of aphasia?
degenerative diseases, TBI (traumatic brain injury(, and

CVAs (cerebrovascular accidents)

5

What are the two types of ischemic strokes in cerebrovascular accidents/heart attacks?

thrombosis and embolism

6

What are blood vessel ruptures and blood pools in the cranial cavity referred to as?

hemorrhagic strokes (usually of the middle cerebral artery)

7

What are dementias such as Alzheimer's, MIDs, and PIck's disease examles of?

degenerative diseases

8

What are MVAs and tumors examples of?

traumatic brain injury

9

Language disability is often accompanied by other cognitive challenges e.g., judgment issues, more generalized memory difficulties, in

traumatic brain injuries

10

What is a missing uncontrollable factor for CVAs?
- age (most strokes occur after age 65)
- gender
- ethnic group
- family history

- prior stroke

11

What is a missing controllable factor for CVAs?
- hypertension
- high cholesterol/heart disease
- diabetes
- smoking
- alcohol use
- oral contraceptives
- lack of exercise

- obesity

12

What is the missing syndrome for fluent aphasias?
- transcortical sensory aphasia
- conduction aphasia

Wernicke's aphasia

13

What is the missing syndrome for non-fluent aphasias?
- transcortical motor aphasia
- global aphasia

Broca's aphasia

14

What is the missing syndrome for anomic aphasia?
- all other syndromes tend to resolve to anomic aphasia

primary feature is dysnomia

15

Where are non-fluent aphasias associated with?

areas in the frontal cortex, Broca's area

16

Where are fluent aphasias associated with?

areas in the posterior cortices, closer to Wernicke's area

17

Where is Transcortical Sensory Aphasia affected?

parietal lobe and occipital lobe

18

Where is Anomic Aphasia impacted?

parietal lobe

19

Where is Conduction Aphasia immpacted?

temporal lobe

20

Where is Global Aphasia impacted?

anterior temporal lobe (close to Broca's area)

21

Where is Broca's aphasia impacted?

frontal lobe (Broca's area)

22

Where is Transcortical motor aphasia impacted?

frontal lobe

23

Where is Wernicke's aphasia impacted?

temporal lobe (posterior portion of left hemisphere)

24

What is Wernicke's aphasia associated with?

fluent, meaningless speech and jargon; dysnomia

25

What is Transcortical sensory aphasia associated with?

fluent, meaningless speech and jargon, pharaphasias, and dysnomia with GOOD repetition

26

What is conduction aphasia associated with?

fluent, dysnomia, and POOR repetition and reading

27

Is comprehension good with Wernicke's aphasia?

no

28

Is transcortical sensory aphasia associated with good comprehension?

no

29

Is good comprehension associated with conduction aphasia?

fairly; more able to correct errors than Wernicke's

30

What is nonfluent, telegrammatic speech, imp;aired prosody and verbal dyspraxia associated with?

Broca's aphasia