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Flashcards in Lecture VI Deck (54):
1

What is the usual incubation period for viral conjunctivitis?

5-12 days

2

What are s/sx of viral conjunctivitis?

Watery d/c irritations, and hyperemia

Palpable preauricular LAD

3

When should viral conjunctivitis be referred? (2)

Pain or Decreased VA

4

How is viral conjunctivitis transmitted?

Fomites and droplets to the eye

5

How long can viruses live for on fomites with viral conjunctivitis?

a week

6

What is the usual cause of viral conjunctivitis?

Adenovirus

7

Conjunctivitis traveling from one eye to the other indicates what etiology?

Viral

8

What is the symptomatic treatment for viral conjunctivitis?

-antihistamines
-cool compresses

9

What is the complication that can occur with steroids in treating viral conjunctivitis?

Recurrence and cushing problems

10

What is the topical treatment for viral conjunctivitis?

Povidone iodine

11

What is zirgan?

Ocular ganciclovir for HSV

12

What are the s/sx of herpes simplex eye disease? (3)

-Vesicles on skin or eyelid margin
-Epithelial keratitis
-Preauricular LAD

13

What is the role of oral antivirals with HSV blepharoconjunctivitis?

Speed resolution, but is self limited

14

What are the s/sx of bacterial conjunctivitis?

-Bilateral mucopurulent d/c
-Lid crusting

15

Should you culture bacterial conjunctivitis?

no--will not change treatment or alter outcomes the vast majority of the time

16

What is the treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis? (3)

-Topical abx QID
-Cleansing
-Warm moist compresses

17

What are the ab that should be used to bacterial conjunctivitis?

-Aminoglycosides (tobramycin/neomycin)

18

What are the causes of neonatal conjunctivitis? (3)

-Gonorrhea
-Chlamydia
-HSV

19

What is the definition of neonatal conjunctivitis?

Conjunctivitis in a neonate (less than 1 month)

20

What is the only conjunctivitis that should be cultured?

Neonatal conjunctivitis

21

Any contact lens wearer who develops ocular symptoms probably has what, cause by what?

Corneal ulcer caused by pseudomonas

22

What is the leading infectious cause of blindness in the US?

HSV eye disease

23

What type of infection usually occurs with the primary, and secondary episodes of herpetic conjunctivitis?

Primary = unilateral blepharoconjunctivitis

Secondary= bilateral above,or epithelial keratitis

24

What is the fluorescence pattern that is seen with HSV infections?

branching with terminal end bulbs

25

Why should you avoid topical steroids with herpes keratitis?

-Elevates intraocular pressure
-Causes cataracts
-May potentiate fungal corneal ulcers

26

What is the treatment for HSV conjunctivitis?

Trifluorothymidine or ganciclovir

27

What can cause conjunctival hemorrhage?

Coughing, sneezing, valsalva

28

What is the treatment for conjunctival hemorrhage?

Nothing

29

What are pinguecula?

a common type of conjunctival degeneration in the eye., usually caused by UV light and wind exposure

30

How do you manage pinguecula? (3)

-Artificial tears
-Topic vasoconstrictors if inflamed
-Sunglasses

31

What is episcleritis?

Inflammation of the sclera, usually causing raised, hyperemic lesions

32

Why is there pain with EOM with episcleritis?

Inflammation over the area of insertion of the EOMs

33

Pouching of the uveal tract = ?

Scleritis 2/2 RA

34

What is iritis?

Circumcorneal injection, usually 2/2 trauma

35

What is the classic s/sx of iritis?

Photophobia

36

What are the signs of iritis?

-White cells in anterior chamber
-Hypopyon
-Keratic precipitates

37

How do you treat uveitis?

Topic steroids

38

When are topical anesthetics prescribed with uveitis?

NEVER--inhibit the growth of the epithelium

39

What happens to the cornea with viral conjunctivitis that causes decreased visual acuity? What is the treatment for this?

Antibody deposits in the cornea

Steroids, but these have their own problems

40

What are the common bacterial causes of bacterial conjunctivitis?

-Staph
-Strep
-Haemophilus
-Pseudomonas

41

Branching pattern with terminal bulbs on fluorescence = ?

HSV infections

42

What is endophthalmitis?

an inflammation of the internal coats of the eye. It is a possible complication of all intraocular surgeries, particularly cataract surgery, with possible loss of vision and the eye itself. Infectious etiology is the most common and various bacteria and fungi have been isolated as the cause of the endophthalmitis. Other causes include penetrating trauma and retained intraocular foreign bodies.

43

What are the three indications for pterygium?

1. interferes with vision
2. Causes astigmatism
3. Cosmetic reasons

44

What is episcleritis associated with?

Autoimmune inflammation

45

What is Hypopyon?

Inflammatory cells in the anterior chamber of the eye.

It is a sign of inflammation of the anterior uvea and iris, i.e. iritis, which is a form of anterior uveitis.

46

What are the fundus findings of optic atrophy?

Excessively pale optic disc

47

What type of imaging should be obtained to evaluate orbital trauma

noncontrast CT

48

Should you assess VA with eye trauma?

Yes

49

Why should you not attempt to move a clot from a traumatic eye?

May cause excessive bleeding

50

What should be done with a severe traumatic eye?

Shield and immediate referral

51

What is lagophthalmos?

The inability to close the eyelids completely.

52

A flat anterior chamber indicates what?

Loss of aqueous humor

53

What happens to the pupil with trauma?

Will point to the trauma

54

Should a TDaP be given with ocular trauma?

Yes