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Flashcards in NURS 303- EXAM 1 Deck (85):
1

powerful assessment tool

holistic view of the patient

five different ways to assess a patient

functional health pattern framework

2

five ways to assess a patient

pattern
indiviudal-environment
age-developmental
functional
cultural

3

patterns of behavior over time.
lack of pattern is a pattern

pattern

4

role relationships
family functional health patterns
societal norms

individual-environment

5

developmental taste = learning opportunities

age-developmental

6

what can the patient physically do

functional

7

individuals perceived health and well-being and how health is managed

health perception and health management

8

food and fluid consumption relative to metabolic needs and indicators of local nutrient supply

nutritional-metabolic pattern

9

excretory function
(bowel, bladder, skin)

elimination pattern

10

exercise, activity, leisure, and recreation

activity-exercise pattern

11

sleep
rest
relaxation

sleep rest pattern

12

sensory, perceptual, and cognitive patterns

cognitive-perceptual pattern

13

self-concept pattern and perceptions of self, self-conception and self-esteem

self-perception and self-concept pattern

14

role engagements and relationships

roles-relationships pattern

15

person's satisfaction and dissatisfaction with sexuality and reproduction

sexuality-reproductive pattern

16

general coping pattern and effectiveness in stress tolerance

coping-stress tolerance pattern

17

values, beliefs, or goals that guide choices or decisions

values-beliefs pattern

18

most are problem oriented
includes potential health problems and life processes

nursing diagnosis

19

readiness for enhanced coping, immunization status, self-concept

health promotion diagnosis

20

family's role in health care

develop self-care and dependent care
foster resilience
provide resources
promote individualization

21

take everyone's values into consideration before acting

systems perspective

22

most families complete basic family developmental tasks

failure to accomplish a developmental task leads to neg. consequences

each new stages require adaptation with new responsibilities

developmental perspective

23

lifestyle
biological
environmental
social, psycholocial, cultural, spiritual
health care system

risk-factor perspective

24

screening is....

secondary prevention

25

objectives for screening

detect disease in early stage
detects risk factors for prevention
reduce costs of disease

26

level of disease priority

significance

27

those affected by a disease state or disability

morbidity

28

death from diseased state

mortality

29

rate of new diagnoses

incidence

30

how many people have the disease right now

prevalence

31

are the results reproducible?

reliability

32

2 people

interobserver

33

1 person

intraobserver

34

reflects the accuracy or truthfulness of the test or instrument itself

validity

35

this refers to the proportion of people with a condition who correctly test positive when screened

sensitivity

36

low sensitivity

high false neg

37

high sensitivity

low false neg

38

measures the tests ability to recognize negative reactions or non diseased individuals

specificity

39

low specificity

high false pos

40

high specificity

low false pos

41

low specificity for this test

chest x ray

42

degree to which individuals have the capability to obtain, process, and understand basic health info and services needed to make appropriate health choices.

if we can't communicate at the level of the patient, there is no learning

health literacy

43

communication skills are based on what 3 things

patients
family
healthcare providers

44

how to teach effectively

stimulate variety of senses
active involvement of the learner
assess learning readiness
make info relevant to the learner
use repetition
start with what is known and then move from there

45

paradigm used to predict and explain health behavior.
was developed to describe why people failed to participate in programs to detect or prevent disease.

health belief model

46

Bandrura's model emphasizing the influence of self-efficacy, or efficacy beliefs, on health behavior.

also describes the roles of reinforcement and observational learning in explaining health behavior

social cognitive theory

47

refers to an individuals belief in being personally capable of performing the behavior required to influence one's own health.

self efficacy

48

useful for determining where a person is in relation to making a behavior change.

transtheoretical model of change

49

stages of transtheoretical model of change

pre contemplation
contemplation
planning
action
maintenance

50

this approach is to assess behavior.

education about need for/benefit of change

motivate using personalized messages

assess/increase self-efficacy

decrease barriers to change

modify behavior

cognitive behavioral approach

51

applying principles of respect, autonomy, justice, and beneficence, nurses have an active role as advocates in empowering their health and care

ethics

52

may emphasize a phase of the behavior change process that is related to the individual's health-promotion needs or problems.

Teaching plan

53

3 steps in determining expected learning outcomes

program goals
learning goals
learning objectives

54

are broad statements on long-range expected accomplishments that provide direction; they do not have to be stated in measurable terms

program goals

55

these goals reflect the health behavior or health status change that the person will have achieved by the end of and educational intervention.


these relate to the program goals

learning goals

56

indicate the steps to be taken by the individual toward meeting the learning goal and may involve the development of knowledge, skill or change in attitude.

needs to contain an action verb

learning objectives

57

3 domains of learning

cognitive
psychomotor
affective

58

development of new facts or concepts, and building on or applying knowledge to new situations

cognitive learning

59

involved developing physical skills from simple to complex actions

psychomotor learning

60

alludes to the recognition of values, religious and spiritual beliefs, family interaction patterns, and relationships, and personal attitudes that affect decisions and problem-solving progress.

affective learning

61

accepted as the standard tools for arranging levels of learning objectives according to type or complexity.

levels of learning(bloom's taxonomy)

62

involves selecting the methods and tools and structuring the sequence of activities.

designing learning strategies

63

4 teaching strategies

lecture
discussion
demonstration
simulation

64

capacity to read, comprehend, an follow through on health info

health literacy

65

a dichotomized portrayal of health and illness ranging from high-level wellness at the positive end to depletion of health at the negative end

wellness-illness continuum

66

sense of well being, life satisfaction, and quality of life.

high-level wellness

67

includes adaptation to disease and disability through various levels of functional ability.

negative end

68

4 models of health

clinical model
role performance model
adaptive model
eudaimonistic model

69

absence and illness by the conspicuous presence of signs and symptoms of disease

clinical model

70

defines health in terms of individuals' ability to perform social roles

role performance

71

people's ability to adjust positively to social, mental, and physiological change is the measure of their health.

adaptive model

72

exuberant well-being indicates optimal health

eudaimonistic model

73

levels reflected in terms of performance/social expectations; loss indicator of need for nursing intervention.

functioning

74

state of physical, mental, spiritual, and social functioning within developmental context.

health

75

failure of a person's adaptive mechanism to counteract stimuli and stresses adequately, resulting in functional or structural disturbances.

disease

76

composed of the subjective experience of the individual and the physical manifestation of disease

illness

77

erikson's eight life stages

infancy
early childhood
late childhood
early adolescent
adolescent
early adulthood
middle adulthood
maturity

78

trust vs. basic mistrust

infancy

79

autonomy vs. shame and doubt

early childhood

80

initiative vs. guilt

late childhood

81

industry vs. inferiority

early adolescent

82

identitiy vs. role confusion

adolescents

83

intimacy vs. isolation

early adulthood

84

generativity vs. stagnation

middle adulthood

85

ego integrity vs. despair

maturity