Suture and Biomaterials Flashcards Preview

Surgery I > Suture and Biomaterials > Flashcards

Flashcards in Suture and Biomaterials Deck (40):
1

What are the six suture characteristics to consider?

Suture size
Flexibility
Surface characteristic/coating
Capillarity
Knot strength + secruity

2

What is the size range of suture?

12-0 (smallest) to 7 (largest)

3

What is memory?

Inherent capability of suture to return to or maintain original shape

4

What does memory refer to?

Flexibility

5

What, besides memory, plays a role in flexibility?

Torsional stiffness + Diameter

6

What is the most flexible type of suture?

Silk

7

What is drag?

Amount of friction created as suture is pulled through the skin

8

What happens when a suture has high drag?

Creates more micro-trauma

9

What type of tissue has more drag?

Braided

10

What is the main reason that braided suture is coated?

To decrease capillarity

11

What is capillarity?

Degree to which absorbed fluid is transferred along suture

12

What type of suture tends to have the highest capillarity?

Multifilament

13

Do monofilament sutures have capillarity?

No

14

What types of coatings can be on suture?

Water soluble or insoluble

15

What does an antibacterial coating on suture do?

Creates a zone of INHIBITION around suture

16

What is tensile strength?

Ability of material to resist deformation and breakage

17

What causes a decrease in tensile strength?

As suture is absorbed/stretches

18

What happens to tensile strength as an incision site heals?

Decrease in tensile strength of the suture and increase in the tissue

19

What is relative knot security?

Strength require to break or untie a knot

20

What type of suture tends to have the best knot security?

Braided

21

What can the surgeon do to decrease the suture tensile strength?

Grab the suture with an instrument

22

What is elasticity?

Degree to which suture will dorm under stress or load + return to original form when load is removed

23

What is plasticity?

degree to which suture will deform without breaking and then maintain shape

24

What is pliability?

Ease of handling and ability of suture to change shape

25

What is creep?

Tendency of suture to slowly and permanently deform under constant stress

26

What defines a suture as absorbable?

loses most of its tensile strength in 60 to 90 days

27

What are the two kinds of natural fibers?

Silk + Catgut

28

What type of suture is silk?

Non-absorbable, but will degrade after 2 years

29

What is catgut made from?

Small intestine of submucosa of sheep

30

What are the benefits of chronic catgut?

Delays absorption
Decreases inflammation

31

How do most sutures degrade?

Hydrolysis

32

How does catgut degrade?

Protelysis

33

When is surgical mesh used?

Repair of slow healing tissue

34

What compounds are surgical mesh made from?

Polyprolene
SIS

35

What does the small pore size prevent?

Ingrowth of capillaries + Fibroblasts

36

What does the presence of SIS make surgical mesh?

Xenograph

37

How does tissue adhesion work?

Polymerizes once it touches anions within the wound tissue

38

What is the proper way to place tissue adhesive?

Pinch the edges together then place the glue

39

What is the name of circular staples?

EEA

40

What are the types of linear staples?

TA + GIA + LDS