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Surgery I > Tissue Handling + Suture Patterns > Flashcards

Flashcards in Tissue Handling + Suture Patterns Deck (32):
1

Who is William Stewart Halsted?

Human surgeon; came up with the basic principles of aseptic surgery

2

What are the seven Halsted's principles?

Strict asepsis
Good hemostasis
Decreased Dead Space
Minimize tissue trauma
Maintain blood supply
Avoid too much tension
Apposition of tissue

3

What are the three types of biomaterials?

Suture + Metals/alloys + Polymers

4

What happens with physical-induced response w/ polymers?

Fibrous tissue formation

5

What happens with chemical-induced response w/ polymers?

Acute but mild inflammatory response or chronic response

6

What is the ideal response to polymers?

Minimal, thin layer of fibrous tissue

7

What are the four big things that suture materials need to be?

Non-electrolytic
Non-capillary
Non-allergenic
Non-carcinogenic

8

What are the three ways to classify sutures?

Degradable + Composition + Filaments

9

What is the strength of the wound dependent on?

Ability of the tissue to hold the suture

10

How strong should the suture be?

As strong as the tissue you are placing it in

11

Why is elastic suture material good?

to give room for edema

12

If wound is under tension what is the best method to handle it?

Increase suture number not size

13

What is important to do with the knot in a simple interrupted?

Offset

14

What determines the distance from the incision that you will place your simple interrupted?

Thickness of skin

15

What is one problem you can get with simple interrupted?

Too much tension leads to wound inversion

16

What is the upside of simple continuous sutures?

Fast and saves suture

17

What is the best tissue to use simple continuous?

Elastic tissue under little pressure

18

What is the downside to simple continuous?

One part breaks, it all breaks

19

Which one has more strength continuous or interrupted?

Interrupted

20

Where is interrupted horizontal mattress used?

Skin + SQ + Fascia + Muscle + Tendons

21

What is the down side to using interrupted horizontal mattress?

Reduced blood flow to edges

22

What occurs to the tissue edges with interrupted horizontal mattress?

Everting

23

What are mayo scissors commonly used for?

Dissection of CT

24

What are metzenblum scissors commonly used for?

Sharp/blunt dissection of delicate tissue

25

What are the three types of forceps?

Rat tooth + Adson + Brown-Adson

26

What are rat tooth forceps used for?

Manipulate skin and tough CT

27

What are adson forceps used for?

Thin skin and facial planes

28

What are Brown-Adson forceps used for?

Routine wound closure

29

What are the three types of ligatures?

Simple + Trans-fixation + Simple w/ clamps

30

What are trans-fixation ligatures good for?

Larger vessels w/ excellent security

31

What are simple ligatures w/ clamps good for?

Arteries and organ/tumor removal

32

What are the three types of retractors?

Gelpi + Weitlaner + Army-Navy