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Pharmacotherapeutics I > Vaccinations > Flashcards

Flashcards in Vaccinations Deck (49)
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1

Immunity

The ability of the human body to tolerate self and to eliminate foreign "nonself" material.
Provides protection from infectious disease
Interacting cells whose primary purpose is to identify foreign substances refereed to as antigens

2

Immune system defense against antigen

Developed and is known as the immune response and usually involves the production of protein molecules by B lymphocytes.

3

Two basic mechanisms for acquiring immunity

Active and passive

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Active immunity

Protection that is produced by the person's own immune system. This type of immunity is usually permanent.

5

Passive immunity

Protection by products produced by an animal or human and transferred to another human, usually by injection.
Provides effective protection, but this protection disappears with time, usually occurring within a few weeks or months.

6

Passive Immunity-Mother to infant

Antibodies transported across the placenta during last 1-2 mo. of pregnancy
Full term has same antibodies as mom for protection from some diseases up to a year.
Better protection for measles, rubella, tetanus than polio, pertussis

7

Passive-immunity-blood products

Many blood products contain antibody
Wash/reconstituted RBC small amount
IVIC/plasma products a large amount

8

Homologous pooled human antibody (immune globulin)

Pooling of IgG antibody fraction from thousands of donors
Antibodies to many different antigens
Post exposure prophylaxis for Hep A and measles, tx of certain congenital immunoglobulin deficiencies.

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Homologous hyperimmune globin

High titers of specific antibody
Other antibodies due to donated plasma
Post-exposure prophylaxis for hep B, rabies, tetanus, and varicella

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Heterlogous hyperimmune serum (antitoxin)

Produced in animals mostly equine (serum sickness) and contains antibodies only against 1 antigen (botulism and diphtheria)

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Monoclonial antibodies

Produces from single clone of B cells
Antibody to one antigen or closely related antigen
Used for dx of certain cancers, prevention of transplant rejection, and tx of autoimmune dz.

12

Monoclonial Antibodies- Palivizumab (Synagis)

prevention of RSV

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Active immunity- surviving infection

Memory B cells circulate and reside in bone marrow for years
Upon re-exposure to antigen memory B-cells replicate and reestablish protection.

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Active immunity- vaccination

Produce an immune response similar to that produced by natural infection but without the dz or complications.

15

Influences on immune response to vaccination

Presence of maternal antibody, nature and dose of antigen, route of administration, presence of adjuvant, and host factors

16

Live attenuated vaccine

Produced by modifying a disease-producing (wild type) virus or bacterium
Resulting organism retains ability to grow and produce immunity by usually does not cause illness

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Inactivated vaccine

Composed of whole viruses or bacteria or fractions of either
Protein based- toxoids and subunit or subviron products
Polysaccharide based- pure cell wall polysaccharide from bacteria

18

Live attenuated

Weakened in lab therefore dz does not usually occur but a milder version.
Severe rxns possible due to uncontrolled replication in immunodeficient pts
Interfere w/ circulating antibodies (measles move sensitive polio and rotavirus least affected)
Usually require one does
Destroyed by heat and light

19

Live attenuated vaccines- viral

MEASLES, MUMPS, RUBELLA, vaccinia (small pox), VARICELLA ZOSTER, yellow fever, ROTAVIRUS, INTRANASAL INFLUENZA, oral polio

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Live attenuated vaccines- bacterial

Oral typhoid vacccine

21

Inactivated vaccine- info

Cannon replicate
Less interference from circulating antibodies
Generalyl 3-5 doses required
Immune response is mostly humoral
Antibody titer diminishes with time.

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Inactivated vaccines- whole-cell vaccines

Viral- polio, hep A, rabies
Bacterial- typhoid, cholera, plague (not available in the US)

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Inactivated vaccines- fractional vaccines

Subunit- hep B, influenza injection, acellular pertussis, human papillomavirus, anthrax
Toxoid- diptheria, tetanus

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Inactivated vaccines- polysaccharide vaccines

Pure polysaccharide- not consistently immunogenic in children <2. No booster response, antibody with less functional activity. Types: pneumococcal, meningococcal, salmonella typhi
Conjugated polysaccharides- improves upon immunogenicity, T cell dependent. Types: haemophilis influenzae type B (HIB), pneumococcal, meningococcal.

25

Vaccination timing

Inactivated vaccines can be administered before, after, or at the same time as antibodies, live vaccines cannot.

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Administration

Separate MMR and varicella vaccines should be admin children 12 through 47 months of age for first dose
Individual vaccines SHOULD NOT be mixed in the same syringe.

27

Multi-dosing intervals

Increasing interval b/w doses does not diminish the effectiveness
Decreasing the interval b/w doses MAY interfere w/ antibody response and protection

28

ADRs-local, systemic, allergic

Local- 80% swelling, pain, redness at site of injection, common in inactivated vaccine, mild and self limiting
Systemic- fever, malaise, HA, may be unrelated to vaccine, live vaccines usually produce mild effects 7-12 days after
Allergic- very rare should be noted in the chart

29

Contraindications

Permanent- severe allergic rxn, encephalopathy occurring 7 days post pertussis vaccine, severe combined immunodeficiency (rotavirus)
Temporary- pregnancy and immunosupression contraindications to live vaccines

30

Precautions

Moderate or severe actue illness
Recent receipt of an antibody containing blood product