Vergil's Aeneid Book I Lines 494-519 Flashcards Preview

AP Latin-V > Vergil's Aeneid Book I Lines 494-519 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Vergil's Aeneid Book I Lines 494-519 Deck (12):
1

Haec dum Dardaniō Aeneae miranda videntur, dum stupet obtutuque haeret defixus in unō,

While these things seem wonderful to Dardanian Aeneas, while he stands amazed, fastened, he clings on one view,

2

regina ad templum, formā pulcherrima Didō, incessit magnā iuvenum stipante catervā.

the queen, Dido, most beautiful in form, marched to the temple with a large band of youths crowding.

3

Qualis in Eurotae ripīs aut per iuga Cynthī exercet Diana choros, quam mille secutae hinc atque hinc glomerantur Oreades;

Just as on the banks of the Eurota or on the ridges of Cynthus Diana trains the dances, whom a thousand mountain nymphs have followed here and there the Oreads are gathered;

4

illa pharetram fert umerō gradiensque deas supereminet omnes (Latonae tacitum pertemptant gaudia pectus):

that woman carries her quiver in her shoulder and walking towers above all the goddesses (joys possess the silent heart of Latona):

5

talis erat Dido, talem se laeta ferebat per medios instans operi regnisque futuris.

such was Dido, happy she was carrying herself such through the middle urging on the work and future kingdom.

6

Tum foribus divae, mediā testudine templi, saepta armis soliōque altē subnixa resedit.

Then at the doors of the goddess, in the middle of the vault of the temple, inclosed in arms resting on the high throne she sat down.

7

Iura dabat legesque virīs, operumque laborem partibus aequabat iustīs aut sorte trahebat:

She was giving laws and rules to the men, and the toil of work she was equalizing in just parts or was drawing by lot:

8

cum subitō Aeneas concursū accedere magnō Anthea Sergestumque videt fortemque Cloanthum Teucrorumque alios, ater quos aequore turbō dispulerat penitusque alias avexerat oras.

when suddenly Aeneas sees Antheus and Sergestes approach with a great crowd and the brave Cloanthus and the other Trojans, whom the dark storm on the sea had driven apart and had carried away to other shores deep within.

9

Obstipuit simul ipse, simul percussus Achates laetitiāque metūque;

He himself at the same time stood agape, at the same time Achates was struck both by joy and fear;

10

avidī coniungere dextras ardebant, sed res animos incognita turbat.

greedy they were burning to join right hands, but the unknown thing disturbed their minds.

11

Dissimulant et nube cavā speculantur amictī quae fortuna virīs, classem quō litore linquant, quid veniant;

They hide and watch wrapped in a hollow cloud what fortune might the men have, on which shore might they leave the fleet, why they may have come;

12

cunctis nam lectī navibus ibant orantes veniam et templum clamore petebant.

for chosen men from all the ships were going praying for favor and were seeking the temple in a clamor.

Decks in AP Latin-V Class (65):