Vergil's Aeneid Book IV Lines 304-330 Flashcards Preview

AP Latin-V > Vergil's Aeneid Book IV Lines 304-330 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Vergil's Aeneid Book IV Lines 304-330 Deck (18):
1

Tandem hīs Aenean compellat vocibus ultrō:

Finally she addresses Aeneas with these words beyond:

2

"Dissimulare etiam sperasti, perfide, tantum posse nefas tacitusque mea decedere terrā?

"Did you, perfidious one, hope to be able to conceal so great a crime and silent to depart from my land?

3

Nec te noster amor nec tē data dextera quondam nec moritura tenet crudeli funere Dido?

Does neither our love nor your right hand once given nor Dido about to die from a cruel death hold you?

4

Quin etiam hibernō moliri sidere classem et mediīs properas Aquilonibus īre per altum, crudelis?

In fact do you also hurry to prepare the fleet in the winter star and to go over the deep sea in the middle of the North wind, cruel one?

5

Quid, sī non arva aliena domosque ignotas peteres, et Troia antiqua maneret, Troia per undosum peteretur classibus aequor?

Why, if you should not seek foreign fields and unknown homes, and ancient Troy should remain, would Troy be sought over the wavy sea with the fleet?

6

Mene fugis?

Do you flee me?

7

Per ego has lacrimas dextramque tuam te (quando aliud mihi iam miserae nihil ipsa reliqui),

Through these tears and your right hand I (since for miserable me I myself have left no other thing behind),

8

per conubia nostra, per inceptos hymenaeos,

through our marriage, through the marriage undertaken,

9

si bene quid de te meruī, fuit aut tibi quicquam dulce meum,

if I have well deserved anything from you, or for you there was anything sweet of mine,

10

miserere domūs labentis et istam, oro, si quis adhuc precibus locus, exue mentem.

pity a falling home and, I beg, if there is still any place for prayers, discard that mind of yours.

11

Te propter Libycae gentes Nomadumque tyrannī odere, infensī Tyriī;

Because of you, the Libyan nations and the tyrants of North African tribes have hated me, and the hostile Tyrians;

12

te propter eundem exstinctus pudor et, quā solā sidera adibam, fama prior.

because of the same you my honor has been ruined and, by which alone I was going to the stars, and my former reputation.

13

Cui me moribundam deseris hospes (hoc solum nomen quoniam de coniuge restat)?

To whom you, a guest, desert me about to die (since this name alone remains concerning our marriage)?

14

Quid moror?

Why do I delay?

15

An mea Pygmalion dum moenia frater destruat aut captam ducat Gaetulus Iarbas?

Whether while my brother Pygmalion should destroy my walls or Gaetulian Iarbas should lead me captured?

16

Saltem si qua mihi de te suscepta fuisset ante fugam suboles,

At least for me if any little offspring had been born from you before flight,

17

si quis mihi parvulus aulā luderet Aeneas, qui te tamen ore referret,

if for me any little Aeneas should play in the court, who, however, would bring you back with his expression,

18

non equidem omninō capta ac deserta viderer."

indeed I would not completely seem captured and deserted."

Decks in AP Latin-V Class (65):