3: GI infection control Flashcards Preview

Gastrointestinal Week 5 2016/17 > 3: GI infection control > Flashcards

Flashcards in 3: GI infection control Deck (29)
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1

What causes GI infections in the community?

Cross-contamination

Undercooking

Poor storage of food

Poor reheating of food

2

Which bacteria causes hospital-related diarrhoea?

C. difficile

3

Clostridium difficile produces ___ which produce disease.

toxins

4

C. difficile is part of the normal gut flora. When does infection occur?

Broad spectrum antibiotics reduce compeition and allow C. diff to increase in number

5

Is C. diff killed by alcohol gel?

No

requires proper handwashing

6

What are the symptoms of C. diff infection?

Diarrhoea +/- blood

Abdominal pain

7

What is a serious complication of C. diff infection?

Bowel dilation

Perforation

Peritonitis

more common in vulnerable patients.

8

How is C. diff infection treated?

Less severe = oral metronidazole

More severe = oral vancomycin

9

Which drugs should be avoided when treating C. diff infection?

4 Cs:

Cephalosporins like ceftriaxone

Clindamycin

Ciprofloxacin

Co-amoxiclav

10

Is C. diff gram positive or gram negative?

Gram positive

11

Clostridium difficile is a gram (positive / negative) (coccus / bacillus).

positive

bacillus

12

What forms on the colon of someone with a C. diff infection?

Pseudomembrane

13

What does a GDH test confirm?

C. diff infection

14

After a GDH test, what other test is done to confirm C. diff infection?

Toxin test

15

If the GDH test is positive, what does that mean?

Positive for C. diff infection

16

If the GDH test is negative but the toxin test is positive, what does that mean?

Positive for C. diff infection

17

If the GDH test is positive but the toxin test is negative, what does that mean?

Indeterminate result

18

What are two examples of viruses which cause diarrhoea?

Rotavirus

Norovirus

19

What is a virus which commonly causes diarrhoea and vomiting in children less than 5 years old?

Rotavirus

20

Rotavirus infection in children tends to be (self-limiting / severe).

self-limiting

21

Rotavirus infection causes dehydration. How is this treated?

Rehydration therapy

22

A vaccine now exists for rotavirus. What type of vaccine is this?

Live attenuated

Virus is still "alive" but has been altered to be less virulent

23

Which virus is also known as the "winter vomiting bug" and is highly infectious?

Norovirus

24

What symptoms are associated with norovirus infection?

Sudden onset explosive D&V

25

At which point in the infection are patients most infectious?

Diarrhoea stage

26

Patients, particularly with C. diff and norovirus infection, should be isolated in ___ ___.

side rooms

27

Which infections would prompt you to send a patient to the ID unit?

E. coli 0157

Salmonella

Norovirus

C. difficile

28

___ hygiene is important in infection control.

Hand

29

If you develop D&V, how long should you stay off work for?

Who should be informed?

48 hours after symptoms have stopped

OHSAS