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Specialty Medicine > Atopy > Flashcards

Flashcards in Atopy Deck (66):
1

What is healing by delayed primary intent?

Contaminated or devitalized tissue demarcates by 4 days

clean wound and repair

2

What type of healing is done with wounds that have dehisced?

Secondary--surgical wounds

3

What is the care for partial thickness wounds?

No closure, skin care only--will reepithelialize fine

4

What is the major difference in the healing process between primary and secondary intent?

Primary has a much smaller plug than secondary

5

How long is the inflammatory stage of wound healing?

6 days ish

6

What are the three major stages of wound healing?

Inflammatory
Granulation/proliferation
Remodeling/maturation

7

When does a wound reach its final strength?

12 weeks out

8

Should you use abx with wounds? Why or why not?

No--just breeds resistance

9

Why is smoking bad for wound healing?

Vasoconstriction

10

Atopic dermatitis usually develops by what age, and resolves by what age?

Develops by 5 years, and resolves by adolescence

11

What is the primary symptom of atopic dermatitis?

itch that rashes

12

What are the skin findings with AD?

Erythematous papules, which then coalesce to form erythematous plaque that may weep

13

Where is the rash commonly found with AD in infants and toddlers?

cheeks, forehead, and extensor surfaces

14

Where is the rash commonly found with AD in older children and adolescents?

Lichenified rash in flexural areas of the neck, elbows, wrists, and ankles

15

What does lichenified mean?

Plaque formation in reponse to chronic scratching

16

Where is the rash commonly found with AD in adults?

Lichenified rash in flexural regions and in feet / face

17

What is the common characteristics of AD rash in all ages?

Xerosis

18

What percentage of children with atopic dermatitis also have or will develop asthma or allergic rhinitis?

50-80%

19

What is the atopic triad?

Asthma
Atopic dermatitis
Allergic rhinitis

20

What is samter's triad?

Aspirin Exacerbated Respiratory Disease (AERD), also known as Samter's Triad or Aspirin Sensitive Asthma, is a chronic medical condition that consists of asthma, recurrent sinus disease with nasal polyps, and a sensitivity to aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

21

What are the factors that are thought to play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis? (4)

-Genetics
-Skin barrier dysfunction
-Impaired immune response
-Environment

22

What is the treatment for atopy?

Gentle cleansing,. pat dry, and emollients

23

What should be used for anti-inflammation with itching?

Mild steroid

24

What should be used as an antipruritic for atopy?

Antihistamine

25

What type of moisturizer should be used for itchy skin?

greasy without smells

26

What abx should be used for itchy skin?

Anti staph

27

What is the medium that should be used for mild steroids on the face?

hydrocortisone ointment

28

What is filaggrin? What is its function, and role in atopy?

-protein found in the stratum granulosum cell layer of the epidermis
-Retains water within keratinocytes
-Mutations cause AD

29

What is harlequin baby?

a severe genetic disorder that mainly affects the skin. Infants with this condition are born with very hard, thick skin covering most of their bodies. The skin forms large, diamond-shaped plates that are separated by deep cracks (fissures)

lethal

30

What is pityriasis alba?

Variant of atopic dermatitis that causes irregular, white patches

31

What are the characteristics of pityriasis in the summer and winter?

Summer = hypopigmentation
Winter = dry/scaly

32

How do you differentiate pityriasis alba from fungi?

Woods lamp - and mycology -

33

What is the treatment for pityriasis alba?

Emollients and mild steroid ointment

34

What type of hypersensitivity reaction is allergic contact dermatitis?

Tpye IV

35

What is the treatment for allergic contact dermatitis?

Topical steroids, oral antihistamine

36

How long does it take for s/sx to appear with contact dermatitis?

12-48 hrs

37

What is urticaria? What layer of the skin is affected?

a vascular reaction of the skin, characterized by wheals surrounded by a red halo or flare

Swelling of the uppe dermis

38

what is the cardinal symptom of urticaria?

Pruritis

39

Wheal and flare = ?

Urticaria

40

What, generally, is angioedema?

deep dermis and SQ swelling

41

What are the s/sx of angioedema?

-Face edema
-Painful or burning, but NOT pruritic

42

what is the appearance of angioedema?

Like water filled skin

43

How fast does urticaria present?

Within minutes, and disappear within hours

44

What is the difference between acute and chronic urticaria

-Acute = less than 6 weeks
-chronic = more than 6 weeks

45

Do urticaria blanch?

Yes

46

True or false: most urticaria is acute, and will resolve

true

47

True or false: many patients with chronic urticaria have physical factors that contribute

True

48

What is dermatographism?

fast development of urticaria following scratching

49

What is the major effector cell in urticaria?

Mast cell

50

What is immunologic urticaria?

Antigen binds to IgE on the mast cell surface, crosslinking it, and releasing histamine

51

What is the pathogenesis of non-immunologic urticaria?

Drugs directly cause histamine release, no IgE crosslinking needed

52

What are the three major forms of non-immunologic urticaria?

-Dermographism
-Samter's triad
-Morphine

53

Morphine is a direct histamine releaser. How do you differentiate between histamine release d/t morphine, and an actual allergic reaction?

If distal to site of injection, then probably allergic rxn

54

Does contact dermatitis have a wheal and flare rxn?

No--very superficial

55

What is the role of allergy testing with chronic urticaria?

High false positive rate, and not that useful

56

true or false: chronic urticaria is a continuous and lifelong disorder

False--episodic and limited

57

What is the rate of spontaneous remission with chronic urticar at one year?

30-50%

58

What is the treatment for chronic urticaria?

Oral antihistamines

59

What is the inheritance pattern of C1 inhibitor deficiency?

AD

60

What are the s/sx of angioedema?

Swelling of the hands, feet, and GI tract

61

What is the treatment for angioedema?

FFP +

62

True or false: angioedema is unresponsive to usual anaphylaxis treatment

True

63

What is the type of swelling that is had with angioedema

Non pitting

64

What antiepileptic drug is known for SJS?

Lamotrigine

65

What are the s/sx of TEN/SJS?

bullous rash with sloughing off of the skin. Respiratory compromise from sloughing off of skin

66

What is the treatment for TEN/SJS?

Admit to burn unit, and stop meds