Cat Vx Flashcards Preview

Work > Cat Vx > Flashcards

Flashcards in Cat Vx Deck (22):
1

Name all the vaccines given to cats

Rabies
Feline leukemia (FELV)
Feline rhinovirus/distemper (FVRCP)

2

Name the wellness tests for cats

Fecal
Ringworm test
FELV/FIV testing on new kittens or cats or unknown status (adoptee)

3

What intervals are cat vaccines given in?

3 week intervals

Usually at 6-8 weeks old, 9-11 weeks old, 12-14 weeks old, and 14-16 weeks old

Rabies still can’t be given until 12 weeks old

4

What is the cat vaccine schedule?

6 weeks: FELV/FIV testing, FVRCP #1, First deworming, DTM (ringworm test), and prevention (usually revolution)

9 weeks: FVRCP #2, FELV #1, second deworming, next dose of prevention

12 weeks: FVRCP #3, Rabies, FELV #2, next dose of prevention

16 weeks: FVRCP adult, fecal, 6 mo supply of revolution

5

What is a ringworm (DTM) test?

A simple, painless, and inexpensive test that involves plucking some of the kittens hairs and placing them in a test vial

6

Why is a DTM test important?

A large percentage of cats can carry ringworm infection without obvious symptoms, and it’s contagious to people

7

What does FIV stand for?

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (feline AIDS)

8

Why are FELV and FIV often discussed together?

Even though they’re 2 different viral diseases, they’re often discussed together because co-infection is common and most lab testing devices test for both FELV and FIV at the same time

9

Where does FELV occur?

Worldwide, with prevalence varying by geographic location

10

Which infectious disease of cats is associated with the most cat illness and death?

FeLV

This is why the vx is recommended for ALL kittens (and adults that go outside and could be exposed to other cats)

11

How do you prevent FELV? How do you prevent transmission?

Prevent exposure to other FELV positive cats to prevent catching it

Test to identify infected cats to prevent transmission

Vaccination isn’t a substitute for testing!

12

Why would a cat die from FELV?

The cat usually dies from a disease that it would normally be able to resist bc FELV breaks down a cats ability to fight off infections of any sort

13

What is different about the cat Rv?

We use a non-adjuvanted vaccine for feline rabies- this makes it safer for cats but it is an annual vaccine (vs dogs that get it every 3 years)

14

What 3 diseases does the FVRCP vx protect against?

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR), Calicivirus (C), and Panleukopenia (P)

15

What is feline panleukopenia also known as?

Feline distemper

16

What percent of cats with distemper may die?

90%

17

What are the chances that your cat will be exposed to distemper?

High, because distemper is highly contagious

18

Symptoms of distemper

Vomiting, diarrhea, fever, depression, loss of appetite

19

3 examples of feline respiratory diseases?

Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus (both of which are in the vaccine), and Chlamydia

20

How are feline respiratory diseases spread?

By a pet sneezing, etc

They’re highly contagious and widespread, so chances are high that your cat will be exposed

21

Can a seemingly healthy cat infect your pet with feline respiratory diseases?

Yes

22

What 2 diseases do we not vaccinate against?

FIP (feline infectious peritonitis) and FIV