CH10 - Gastrointestinal Pathology Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in CH10 - Gastrointestinal Pathology Deck (345)
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331

How does the screening for colorectal carcinoma occur?

via endoscopy and fecal occult blood testing

332

When does screening for colorectal carcinoma begin?

at 50 years of age

333

What is the goal for screening for colorectal carcinoma?

To remove adenomatous polyps before carcinoma develops and to detect cancer early (before clinical symptoms arise).

334

In colorectal carcinoma where can carcinoma develop?

anywhere along entire the length of the colon

335

In colorectal carcinoma how does left-sided carcinoma usually grow?

as a napkin-ring lesion;

336

In colorectal carcinoma how does left-sided carcinoma present?

With decreased stool caliber, left lower quadrant pain, and blood-streaked stool

337

In colorectal carcinoma how does right-sided carcinoma usually grow?

as a raised lesion;

338

In colorectal carcinoma how does right-sided carcinoma usually present?

with iron deficiency anemia (occult bleeding) and vague pain. All older adults with iron deficiency anemia has colorectal carcinoma until proven otherwise.

339

What infection is colonic carcinoma associated with?

an increased risk for Streptococcus bovis endocarditis.

340

What is the T stage for colorectal carcinoma based on?

depth of invasion;

341

Do tumors limited to the mucosa generally spread?

No they do not spread due to lack of lymphatics in the mucosa

342

What does the N stage for colorectal carcinoma represent?

spread to regional lymph nodes

343

What does the M stage for colorectal carcinoma represent?

distant spread

344

What does the M stage for colorectal carcinoma most commonly involve?

the liver

345

What is CEA?

it is a serum tumor marker that is useful for assessing treatment response and detecting recurrence; not useful for screening