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Flashcards in Chapter 3 Deck (166)
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1

What is the effect of lipoxins

Suppress inflammation and recruitment of leukocytes

2

What is the composition of transudate

Low protein concentration, no cellular material, and low specific gravity (close to a super filtrate of plasma)

3

What are the characteristic of chronic inflammation morphology

1) Infiltration of mononuclear cells (monocytes,lymphocytes)
2) Tissue destruction
3) Attempts at healing (angiogenesis and fibrosis)

4

What is the mechanism of action of asparin

Acetylates and inactivations cyclooxygenases (COX 1&2)

5

What is the effect of TxA2

Vasoconstriction, promotes platelet coagulation and aggregation

6

What is the function of PGF2alpha

Contraction of uterus, Bronchial, and small arterioles

7

What occurs in the first or priming phase of the liver regeneration

IL-6 production by Kupffer cells (allows ability to respond to GFs)

8

What is the expression level of COX1

Constitutively expressed in all tissues and maintain homeostatic function

9

What are the common locations for fibrinous inflammation

Pleura, meninges, Cardia

10

What are the characteristics of purulent/suppurative inflammation or abcess

Production of pus, exuadate containing neutrophils.

11

What is the function and example of CX3X

Only member is fractalkine
-Promotes strong adhesion of monocytes and T cells (membrane bound form), or chemoattractant (soluble form)

12

What are the functions of the neutral proteases

Degradation of extracellular companents such as collagen, elastin, and cartilage

13

What is the most important C-X-C cytokine

IL-8

14

During first intention wound healing, what occurs by day 5

Neovascularization appears and reaches its peak. Migration of fibroblasts and proliferation triggered by macrophages cytokines. Epidermis reaches its normal thickness

15

C-C chemokines have what structural characteristic

First two conserved cysteines are adjacent

16

What are the molecules leading to fever

TNF, IL-6, IL-1 (main one)

17

What is the maximum amount of liver that can be removed and still result in correction

90%

18

What are the characteristics of the immune granulomas

Agents that are able to sustain a persistent T cell mediated response. Usually associated with a central area of necrosis

19

Deficiency of C1 inhibitor can lead to which condition

Hereditary angioedema

20

What are the two types of granules that are contained in neutrophils

1) Smaller, specific, secondary granules
2) Larger, azurophil, primary granules

21

What is dehiscence and what is the common cause

Rupture of a wound, common after an abdominal surgery where the intrabdominal pressure increases (from coughing, vomiting, or ileus)

22

Purulent/suppurative inflammation is generally caused by which pathogen

Pyogenic (pus causing) bacteria, such as staphylcocci

23

What is a tertiary lymphoid organ, and which cells are present

Lymphocytes, APCs and plasma cells cluster to form lymphoid tissue resembling LN, aka lymphoid organogensis

24

What type of receptors do eicosanoids bind to

GCPR

25

How can COX 2 inhibitors lead to thrombosis

COX2 produces prostaglandins that cause vasodilation, while COX 1 produces platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction. Unopposed COX 1 leads to smaller vessels and clot formation

26

What are the contents of the smaller specific granules

Lysozyme, collagenase, gelatinase, lactoferrin, plasminogen activator, histaminase, alkaline phosphatase

27

What is the role of PDGF in angiogenesis

Recruits smooth muscle cells

28

What does fibrosis generally mean

Abnormal deposition of collagen that occurs in internal organs in chronic diseases

29

What is the condition of stasis

Small vessels dilate, causing the blood to move slower and an increase of locate RBCs

30

What cells are recruited during angiogenesis

Periendothelial cells (pericytes for small capillaries and smooth muscle for larger vessels)