Chapter 3 Ethical Issues in Counseling Practice Flashcards Preview

Theory of Councelling > Chapter 3 Ethical Issues in Counseling Practice > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 3 Ethical Issues in Counseling Practice Deck (40):
1

A higher level of ethical
practice that addresses doing what is in the best
interests of clients.

Aspirational ethics

2

Evaluating the relevant factors in
a client’s life to identify themes for further exploration
in the counseling process.

Assessment

3

A departure from a commonly
accepted practice that could potentially
benefi t a client (e.g., attending a client’s wedding).

Boundary crossing

4

A boundary crossing that
takes the practitioner out of the professional
role, which generally involves exploitation. It is a serious breach that harms the client and is therefore
unethical.

Boundary violation

5

This is an ethical concept, and
in most states therapists also have a legal duty
not to disclose information about a client

Confi dentiality

6

The analysis and explanation of a
client’s problems. It may include an explanation
of the causes of the client’s diffi culties, an account
of how these problems developed over time, a
classifi cation of any disorders, a specifi cation of
preferred treatment procedure, and an estimate
of the chances for a successful resolution.

Diagnosis

7

A counselor
assumes two (or more) roles simultaneously or
sequentially with a client. This may involve assuming
more than one professional role or combining
professional and nonprofessional roles.

Dual or multiple relationships

8

To make ethical decisions,
consult with colleagues, keep yourself informed
about laws affecting your practice, keep up to
date in your specialty fi eld, stay abreast of developments
in ethical practice, refl ect on the impact
your values have on your practice, and be willing
to engage in honest self-examination.

Ethical decisions

9

Psychotherapists
are required to base their practice on techniques
that have empirical evidence to support
their effi cacy.

Evidence-based practice (EBP)

10

The right of clients to be
informed about their therapy and to make autonomous
decisions pertaining to it.

Informed consent

11

The view of ethical practice
that deals with the minimum level of professional
practice.
Nonprofessional

Mandatory ethics

12

Additional relationships
with clients other than sexual ones.

Nonprofessional interactions

13

An approach taken by practitioners
who want to do their best for clients
rather than simply meet minimum standards to
stay out of trouble.

Positive ethics

14

Using data generated
during treatment to inform the process and
outcome of treatment.

Practice-based evidence

15

A legal concept
that generally bars the disclosure of confi dential
communications in a legal proceeding.

Privileged communication

16

1. Mandatory ethics is a higher level of
ethical practice that addresses doing
what is in the best interests of clients

f

17

2. It is unethical for us to meet our
personal needs through our professional
work

f

18

3. Professional codes of ethics educate
counseling practitioners and the
general public about the responsibilities
of the profession and provide
a basis for accountability.

t

19

4. It is a mistake to equate behaving
legally with being ethical

t

20

5. Looking at the relevant ethics codes
for general guidance is the last step
one should take when faced with an
ethical problem

f

21

6. Informed consent is an ethical requirement
that is an integral part of
the therapeutic process; however, it
is not a legal requirement

f

22

7. Informed consent is a positive approach
that helps clients become
active partners and true collaborators
in their therapy.

t

23

8. Privileged communication is a legal
concept that generally bars the disclosure
of confi dential communications
in a legal proceeding.

t

24

9. In reasoning through any ethical
dilemma, there is usually just one
course of action to follow.

f

25

10. The central aim of evidence-based
practice is to require psychotherapists
to base their practice on techniques
that have empirical evidence
to support their effi cacy.

t

26

11. Which of the following statements
about diagnosis is NOT true?
a. Diagnosis is the analysis and explanation
of a client’s problems.
b. Diagnosis is always a part of the
assessment process in counseling.
c. Diagnosis consists of identifying
a specifi c mental disorder based
on a pattern of symptoms.
d. None of these (they are all true).

b

27

12. What is the primary rationale for
conducting a comprehensive assessment
of the client as the initial step
in the therapeutic process?
a. Specifi c counseling goals
cannot be formulated and appropriate
treatment strategies
cannot be designed until a
client’s past and present functioning
is understood.
b. Conducting a comprehensive
assessment of the client offers
inexperienced therapists a concrete
framework from which to
practice. Seasoned clinicians
rarely use this approach since
they can quickly assess the client’s
problem.
c. Insurance companies require clinicians
to submit a comprehensive
assessment of the client in order to
fully reimburse them for services.
d. Those who conduct comprehensive
assessments of their clients
are protected from being sued
for malpractice.

a

28

13. What does the acronym DSM stand
for?
a. Deviance and Sociopathy Manual
b. Developmental and Statistical
Measurement of Mental Disorders
c. Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Mental Disorders
d. Diagnostic and Statistical
Measurement Reference Guide

c

29

14. Kendra is a biracial client who
presents as being reserved and
passiveand who makes minimal
eye contact. Her therapist should a. consider that Kendra’s behavior
and mannerisms may refl ect
distinctive ethnic and cultural
patterns.
b. diagnose Kendra as being
depressed.
c. view Kendra’s behavior as resistance
to the therapeutic process.
d. confront Kendra immediately to
ensure that future sessions are
more productive.

a

30

15. Generally speaking, the concept
of privileged communication does
NOT apply to
a. group counseling.
b. couples counseling and family
therapy.
c. child and adolescent therapy.
d. all of these

d

31

16. David is a counselor trainee who is
working in a mental health center
under the supervision of Dr. Garcia.
In order to behave in an ethical manner,
David should
a. inform his clients at the outset of
counseling that he plans to consult
with his supervisor Dr. Garcia in
order to ensure that he is providing
them with high quality care.
b. not reveal to his clients that he is
a trainee under supervision so as
to prevent them from questioning
his competence, which could undermine
the therapeutic process.
c. ask Dr. Garcia to sit in on every
session he conducts to ensure
that he is developing competence.
d. refuse to work with actual clients
until he is a highly competent
therapist.

a

32

17. Ethics codes
a. are intended to provide ready-made
answers for the ethical dilemmas
that practitioners will encounter.
b. are becoming so specifi c that
they have nearly eliminated the
need for practitioners to use
critical thinking skills and clinical judgment when faced
with ethical issues.
c. are best used as guidelines to
formulate sound reasoning and
serve practitioners in making the
best judgments possible.
d. are so general that they are of
little, if any, use to clinicians.

c

33

18. Paula recently discovered that two
of her clients that she sees individually
had a stormy relationship in
the past. She is wondering whether
she can remain objective in working
with them. Paula should
a. look at the relevant ethics codes for
general guidance on the matter.
b. brainstorm various possible
courses of action.
c. discuss options with other professionals
to get their perspectives.
d. all of these.

d

34

19. When the author uses the term multiple
relationships, he is referring to
a. dual relationships and nonprofessional
relationships.
b. the large caseloads of therapists.
c. the pattern that some clients
have of cheating on their signifi -
cant others and juggling several
relationships at once.
d. serial monogamy

a

35

20. In many mental health settings, clinicians
are pressured to use interventions
that
a. tap into unconscious dynamics.
b. are research-supported even if
they are lengthy.
c. are brief and standardized.
d. focus on early

c

36

21. Which of the following is NOT one
of the three pillars of EBP?
a. looking for the best available
research
b. relying on the best available legal
advice
c. relying on clinical expertise
d. taking into consideration the
client’s characteristics, culture,
and preferences.

b

37

22. Which of the following accounts for
more of the treatment outcome?
a. the therapist’s theoretical
orientation
b. the therapeutic method employed
c. client factors
d. the duration of treatment

c

38

23. The ACA Code of Ethics stresses that
counseling professionals must learn
how to
a. manage multiple roles and responsibilities
in an ethical way.
b. eliminate multiple roles altogether
in order to keep boundaries
from becoming blurred.
c. sensitively confront colleagues
who are juggling multiple roles.
d. fi le ethics complaints when they
witness a colleague engaging in
various professional roles.

a

39

24. Except for , which
is unequivocally unethical, there is
not much consensus regarding the
appropriate way to deal with multiple
relationships.
a. socializing with clients
b. sexual intimacy with current
clients
c. bartering with clients
(e.g., goods for services)
d. sexual attraction to clients
e. all of these

b

40

25. Dr. Hernandez has been invited to
the wedding of her client Cynthia. If
she accepts the invitation,
a. Dr. Hernandez will be committing
a boundary violation.
b. Dr. Hernandez will be engaging
in a boundary crossing.
c. Dr. Hernandez will be acting unethically.
d. Dr. Hernandez will be breaking
the law and could spend some
time in jail.

b