Chapter 3: The Interview Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 3: The Interview Deck (61)
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1

Ad hoc interpreter

Using a patient's family member, friend, or child as interpreter for a patient with limited English proficiency (LEP)

2

Animism

Imagining that inanimate objects (e.g. a blood pressure cuff) come alive and have human characteristics

3

Avoidance

The use of euphemisms to avoid reality or to hide feelings

4

Clarification

Examiner's response used when the patient's word choice is ambiguous or confusing

5

Closed questions

Questions that ask for specific information and elicit a short, one- or two- word answer, a "yes" or "no," or a forced choice

6

Confrontation

Response in which examiner gives honest feedback about what he or she has seen or felt after observing a certain patient action, feeling, or statement

7

Distancing

The use of impersonal speech to put space between one's self and a threat

8

Elderspeak

Infantilizing and demeaning language used by a health professional when speaking to an older adult

9

Electronic health recording

Direct computer entry of a patient's health record while in the patient's presence

10

Empathy

Viewing the world from the other person's inner frame of reference while remaining yourself; recognizing and accepting the other person's feelings without criticism

11

Ethnocentrism

The tendency to view your own way of life as the most desirable, acceptable, or best and to act in a superior manner to another culture's may of life

12

Explanation

Examiner's statements that inform the patient; examiner shares factual and objective information

13

Facilitation

Examiner's response that encourages the patient to say more, to continue with the story

14

Geographic privacy

Private room or space with only the examiner and patient present

15

Interpretation

Examiner's statement that is not based on direct observations, but is based on examiner's inference or conclusion; links events, makes associations, or implies cause

16

Interview

Meeting between the examiner and patient with the goal of gathering a complete health history

17

Jargon

Medical vocabulary used with a patient in an exclusionary and paternalistic way

18

Leading question

A question that implies that one answer would be better than another

19

Nonverbal communication

Message conveyed through body language - posture, gestures, facial expression, eye contact, touch, and even where one places the chairs

20

Open-ended question

Asks for longer narrative information; unbiased; leaves the person free to answer in any way

21

Reflection

Examiner response that echoes that patient's words; repeats part of what the patient has just said

22

Summary

Final review of what examiner understands patient has said; condenses facts and presents a survey of how the examiner perceives the health problem or need

23

Telegraphic speech

Speech used by age 3 or 4 years in which three- or four-word sentences contain only the essential words

24

Verbal communication

Messages send through spoken words, vocalizations, or tone of voice

25

List 8 items of the information that should be communicated to the client concerning the terms or expectations of the interview.

  • Time and place of the interview 
  • Introduce yourself and your role 
  • Purpose of the interview
  • How long it will take 
  • Expectations of participants 
  • Confidentiality - to what extent 
  • Any costs to the client
  • Presence of any additional individuals
  • Clear up any confusion 

26

Describe the points to consider in preparing the physical setting for the interview.

  • Temperature is comfortable
  • Sufficient lighting (not harsh/direct)
  • Quiet 
  • Remove distractions
  • Appropriate distance (4-5 ft)
  • Equal status seating 
  • Arrange face-to-face position 

27

List the pros and cons of note-taking during the interview.

  • Cons
    • Breaks eye contact
    • Shifts attention away from individual 
    • May cause individual to slow down (not fulling express themself)
    • Impedes observation of nonverbal behavior
    • Threatening to client during discussion of sensitive issues

 

  • Pros
    • Accurate notes
    • Detailed notes

28

Contrast open-ended versus closed questions, and explain the purpose of each during the interview.

  • Open-ended: used to start an interview
    • Allows patient to ellaborate and give an account fo their concerns and allows you to establish rapport and give you a chance to observe their nonverbals 
  • Closed question: used to get specific information/facts
    • Helps clarify information 

29

List the 9 types of examiner responses that could be used during the interview, and give a short example of each.

  • Facilitation: mm-hmm
  • Silence: count to 10 silently
  • Reflection: patient says, "I have kids at home I am worried about." Nurse says, "You have anxiety about your children?"
  • Empathy: "It must be hard"
  • Clarification: repeat back what they said using your own words and understanding
  • Confrontation: "You look sad"
  • Interpretation: links events, makes association, implies cause; "it seems that every time your stomach is upset there are a lot of stressors in your life."

30

List the 10 traps of interviewing, and give a short example of each.

1. Provides false assurance or reassurance: "everything will be fine"

2. Giving unwanted advice: "If I were you..."

3. Using authority: "If your doctor knows best"

4. Using avoidance language: "He has gone to a better place"

5. Distancing: "There is a lump in the left breast" vs "Your left breast"

6. Using professional jargon: "Your hypertension...."

7. Using leading or biased questions: "You don't smoke, right?"

8. Talking too much: talking more than you listen 

9. Interrupting: cutting patient off

10. Using "Why" questions implies blame: "Why did you wait so long"