Chapter 4 - Origines des attitudes Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 4 - Origines des attitudes Deck (6)
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1

Origin of attitudes: the 4 origins

• Modèle tripartite (cognitive, affective et comportement) (- as seen in chapter 1)
• Explicite vs. implicite
• Evolution
• Génétique

2

Origin of attitudes: Origine cognitive

Expectancy-value (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975) -> chapter 7 :
belief = occurrence x value (+/-)

Information integration (Anderson, 1981): chapter 7 -> chapter 7
belief = importance x value (favorability)

Receipt/acceptance of information (McGuire, 1972) -> Chapter 16

Cognitive response (Greenwald, 1968) -> Chapter 16

Dual models (Petty & Cacioppo, 1986; Chaiken & Stangor, 1987) -> chapter 17

3

Origin of attitudes: Origine affective

Operating conditioning (Hull, 1951; Skinner, 1957): depending on the consequences (+/-) -> chapter 14

Conventional conditioning (Staats & Staats, 1958): stimulus conditioned + conditioning (+/-) -> chapter 14

Mother exhibition (Zajonc, 1968): familiarity -> chapter 15

4

Origin of attitudes: Origine comportementale (chapitre 11)

Dissonance/commitment

-> why out attitudes are based also on how we reach to ceratin objects or on how we reacted to objects in the past

Self-perception (Bem, 1972)

5

Origin of attitudes: Origine explicite vs. implicite
(chapitres 9 & 10)

Different processes rather than different content

Implicit:
- Without control or conscience
- Lack of knowledge of our attitudes and their impact
- Debate: cognitive/explicit and emotional/implicit agreement
- But, independence between origin (implicit vs. explicit) and response (implicit vs. explicit) -> confusion
- Sources (Rudman, 2004):
- Life experience / lived experience
- Culture (socialization)
- Emotions (tonsils)
- Internal consistency (Greenwald, 1968) to Chapter 4

6

Genetic vs. environmental influence on attitudes

- Genetics: attitudes determined by genes (biology)

- Evolution: attitudes rewarded by the environment
- For example, choice of sexual partner

-> Controversy with explanations in terms of learning:
- Exaggerates differences and minimizes structural factors
- Explains some attitudes (e.g., genetics: religiosity, political attitudes) but not all (e.g., patriotism)

-> Many are determined by both genetic and environmental influences (e.g., political attitudes, Funk et al., 2013; sexual orientation)