Lecture 2: BSF Exam- Cognition, ACOM, Sensation Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Lecture 2: BSF Exam- Cognition, ACOM, Sensation Deck (54)
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1

What are important questions to ask during subjective history?

prior level of function, living environment, work?, resources available, current limitations, client goals

2

What are main components of neuro systems review?

gross movement, motor function

3

What are areas of gross movement?

balance, transfer, gait/ wc mobility

4

What are areas of motor function?

motor control/ muscle tone

5

What are two different approaches that can be taken for a neuro exam?

1. impairment or body structure based/ function oriented

2. activity oriented

6

What factors influence what method you choose?

setting, pt status, level of expertise

7

What are components of BSF oriented exam?

ROM, MMT, muscle tone, consciousness, sensation, cognition, motor control/ACOM, reflexes, cranial nerve integrity

8

What do you do during an activity based exam?

examine and analyze activities then formulate list of hypothesized contributing factors (HCF)

then perform tests specific to HCF to refute or confirm

9

What are components of activity based exam?

balance, trunk control, reaching, bed mobility, transfers, ambulation, stairs, sit to stand

10

What is consciousness and level of arousal?

determines level of readiness for activity

11

What is alert?

awake, attentive, interactive

12

What is lethargic?

drowsy, brief response to stimuli, poor attention

13

What is obtunded?

difficult to arouse, confused when alert

14

What is stupor/ semicoma?

not self alerting, responds to vigorous or noxious stimuli

15

What is a coma?

can't be aroused, unconscious, no sleep wake cycle

16

What is a vegetative state?

irregular sleep wake cycle, can be aroused but no awareness of environment

17

What is persistent vegetative state?

remain in vegetative state for greater than 3 months(anoxia) or 1 year (TBI)

18

What is locked in syndrome?

alert and unable to respond to environment, no speech or active movements

19

What are two standardized tests for consciousness?

glasgow come scale
rancho los amigos scale

20

What are different areas of cognition?

orientation - AO x 3
attention, memory, executive functions

21

What are components of attention?

ability to screen and process sensory info

ability to concentrate and dual task

document: speed of response, duration

22

What are components of memory?

register, retain and recall

short vs long term, ability to follow multi step commands

23

What is retrograde amnesia?

can't recall past info

24

What is anterograde amnesia?

can't learn new info

25

What are executive functions?

awareness, reasoning, planning, judgement, intuition, decision making

26

What are two standardized test and measures for cognition and what scores are needed to "pass"?

mini mental state exam- 24/30

Montreal cognitive assessment 26/30

27

What is Wernicke's aphasia?

receptive or unable to understand language

28

What is Broca's aphasia?

expressive, trouble with speaking

29

What is dysarthria?

poor articulation

30

Why is somatosensation so important?

critical to motor learning and motor performance, guides selection of movement pattern required in a given sensory environment, used by CNS to modify or adapt ongoing movements