Pharm Quiz #7 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Pharm Quiz #7 Deck (59)
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1

What is defined as stage 1 of anesthesia?

It is the analgesia stage. It is from the beginning of induction to loss of consciousness.

2

What is defined as stage 2 of anesthesia?

It is the excitement or delirium stage. It is from the loss of consciousness to onset of automatic breathing. Eyelash reflex disappears. Coughing, vomiting & struggling may occur; respiration irregular with breathing-holding.

3

What is defined as stage 3 of anesthesia?

This is the stage of surgical anesthesia. It is from onset of automatic respiration to respiratory paralysis, divided into four planes.

4

What is defined as Plane 1 of stage 3 of anesthesia?

It is the onset of automatic respiration to cessation of eyeball movements. Eyelid reflex lost, swallowing reflex disappears, marked eyeball movement may occur, conjunctival reflex is lost a the bottom of the plane.

5

What is defined as Plane 2 of stage 3 of anesthesia?

It is the cessation of eyeball movements to beginning paralysis of intercostal muscles. Laryngeal reflex lost, corneal reflex disappears, secretion of tears increases(a useful sign of light anesthesia), respiration automatic & regular, movement & deep breathing as response to skin stimulation disappears.

6

What is defined as Plane 3 of stage 3 of anesthesia?

THIS IS THE DESIRED PLANE FOR SURGERY, ESPECIALLY WHEN MUSCLE RELAXANTS WERE NOT USED.
It is from the beginning to the completion of intercostal muscle paralysis. Diaphragmatic respiration persists, progressive intercostal paralysis, pupils dilated & light reflex is abolished.

7

What is defined as Plane 4 of stage 3 of anesthesia?

From complete intercostal paralysis to diaphragmatic paralysis.

8

What is defined as stage 4 of anesthesia?

From stoppage of respiration to death.
-anesthesia overdose
-medullary paralysis with respiratory arrest and vasomotor collapse
-pupils widely dilated and profound muscle relaxation.

9

How are lipid solubility, OGPC and potency related?

Poor lipid solubility = lower OGPC = Less Potency

10

What are the hallmark characteristics of the insolubility of desflurane?

-rapid induction
-precise control of anesthetic concentrations
-prompt recovery independent of length of anesthesia(the longer the case the more valuable desflurane is)

11

What are the pharmacoeconomics of desflurane?

Desflurane is more expensive/bottle but there is a cost savings of rapid induction and early wake-up. With longer to sleep\wake-up times and flows required for closed circuit technique will actually spend more money using sevoflurane.

12

What are the physical properties of desflurane?(vapor pressure, odor, BGP, MAC and chemical significant in relation to isoflurane?

vapor pressure = 669
odor = ethereal or monkey perfume
BGP = 0.42
MAC = 6.6%
Desflurane is isoflurane with the chloride atom replaced with a fluorine.(3X greater vp than iso/5X less potent than iso)

*desflurane will never be cheaper than isoflurane because it is made from isoflurane*

13

What is the only measurable metabolite found in desflurane?

trifluoroacetate

14

What are the airway characteristics of the use of desflurane?

airway irritant
salivation
breath holding
coughing
laryngospasm

15

At what concentration are the airway irritant properties usually seen in desflurane?

Occurs mainly @ concentrations greater than 6%. Airway irritant if inspired concentrations are increased rapidly.

16

What is a method used to avoid the airway irritant properties that characterize desflurane?

Avoided by incremental increases of inspired concentrations 2% every 2-3 breaths

17

What are the characteristics of the insolubility of desflurane?

-rapid achievement of alveolar(alveolar=brain) partial pressures necessary for anesthesia
-Fi quickly approximates Fa
-prompt awakening
-lower blood gas solubility
-more rapid recovery

18

Desflurane has the lowest tissue solubility(T/F)?

true

19

Does desflurane provide retrograde amnesia?

nope

20

How does desflurane affect cerebral blood flow?

decreases cerebral metabolic rate of O2 consumption
decreases cerebral activity
increases cerebral blood flow(increases ICP)

21

What effect does desflurane have on an EEG at < 0.4 MAC?

increased frequency and voltage

22

What effect does desflurane have on an EEG at 0.4 MAC?

begins to reduce CMRO2

23

What effect does desflurane have on an EEG at 1 MAC?

decrease in EEG frequency, maximal voltage occurs

24

What effect does desflurane have on an EEG at 1.5 MAC?

suppression of burst activity

25

What effect does desflurane have on an EEG at 1.5 - 2 MAC?

electrical silence-no s/s of seizure activity

26

At what MAC does desflurane increasingly depress evoked potentials?

0.5 MAC; the use of nitrous with desflurane does not abolish this characteristic

27

At what MAC does desflurane produce increased cerebral blood flow?

> 0.6 MAC with normocapnia desflurane produces:
-cerebral vasodilation
-reduced cerebral vascular resistance
-increased CBF
-lowered CMRO2
these changes occur in minutes

28

How long does CBF last with desflurane?

up to 4 hours, you only need to hyperventilate for 4 hours if patient has a space occupying lesion

29

How does the CMRO2 reduction of desflurane compare to isoflurane and sevoflurane?

less than isoflurane
comparable to sevoflurane

30

How does desflurane affect ICP?

desflurane will raise ICP. Patients with space occupying intracranial lesions are at increased risk.