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Flashcards in basic principles Deck (34):
1

what are the three types of hormones?

steroids- testosterone and cortisol, tyrosine- adrenaline and thyroid hormones and protein/ peptides-insulin

2

What are 4 types of hormone receptors

G coupled receptor, receptor tyrosine kinase, steroid hormone and kinase activity receptor.

3

what are G protein coupled receptors useful to act as

biological sensors

4

loss of function mutation can occur in GPCR frequently?

yea

5

what does the receptor tyrosine kinase do?

insulin receptor

6

is steroid hormones extracellular or intracellular?

intracellular

7

what results in steroid hormone receptors?

change in gene transcription

8

what does the posterior pituitary produce?

ADH and oxytocin

9

what does the anterior pituitary produce?

LH, FSH, GH, ACTH, PRL, TSH

10

what is a major determinant of hormone secretion?

rate of secretion

11

what are some common hormones requiring measuring?

cortisol. aldosterone, testosterone, thyroid, GH and prolactin

12

what does TSH measure?

thyroid hormone

13

what does a raised TSH indicate?

hypothyroidism

14

TSH might not be a useful indicator of thyroid disease in?

pituitary dysfunction

15

at what time is HPA axis function best seen?

9am

16

What would IGF1 indicate?

high levels of growth hormone secretion

17

when should you measure testosterone levels?

9am

18

what is an important factor when considering female sex hormone measurements

what time of the cycle it is

19

what is prolactin secreted by

lactotroph cells of anterior pituitary

20

What is the lactotroph cells inhibited by?

dopamine

21

what are some causes of hyperprolactinaemia

pregnancy, lactation, chronic renal failure, tumours

22

when is vasopressin released from the posterior pituitary

when increased osmolarity, release of angiotensin 2, sympathetic stimulation

23

what does vasopressin cause the blood vessels and kidneys to do?

vessels- constriction and kidneys- blood reabsorption causing an overall increase in arterial pressure

24

when is typical pituitary testing done?

before imaging

25

what test would you do for hormone excession

suppression test- dexamethasone

26

how would you test for hormone insufficiency?

stimulation test- synacthen

27

What are some signs of cushings?

excess fat pads in supraclavicular/ inter scapular, osteoporosis, hypertension, impaired glucose function

28

70% of cushings syndrome is by?

cushings disease

29

what test is required in cushings

dexamethasone suppression test, measure of ACTH,

30

what does a rise of ACTH and cortisol on CRH suggest?

its pituitary based

31

what type of cell is MEN1

tumour suppressor

32

what type of cell is MEN2

proto oncogenes

33

what is the most common tumour associated with MEN1

parathyroid adenoma

34

what can MEN1 do to mortality and morbidity

increase greatly