Blood Tracing Flashcards Preview

MORS 200 - Sciences > Blood Tracing > Flashcards

Flashcards in Blood Tracing Deck (223):
1

Blood entering the heart flows into the

Right Atrium

2

From the right atrium, the blood passes through a valve known as the

Tricuspid Valve

3

The blood flows through the tricuspid valve into the

Right Ventricle

4

From the right ventricle the blood passes through the

Semilunar Valves

5

After passing through the semilunar valves, the blood enters the

Pulmonary Artery

6

The pulmonary artery carries blood to the

Lungs

7

In the lungs the pulmonary artery subdivides into many tiny branches called

Capillaries

8

The capillaries in the lungs are in direct contact with many tiny air sacs called

Alveoli

9

As the blood flows around the alveoli, it picks up

Oxygen

10

As the blood flows around the alveoli, it gives off

Carbon Dioxide

11

The blood flows through the capillaries, around the alveoli, and then enters the

Pulmonary Veins

12

The pulmonary veins carry blood

Away from the lungs

13

The pulmonary __________ carry blood to the lungs

Artery

14

The pulmonary veins carry the blood to the

Left atrium of the heart

15

From the left atrium the blood passes through the

Bicuspid valve

16

From the lungs, the blood flows through the pulmonary veins to the left atrium, then flows through the bicuspid valve into the

Left Ventricle

17

From the left ventricle, the blood passes through another set of

Semilunar valves

18

From the semilunar valves, the blood flows into the main artery

The Aorta

19

From the aorta the blood goes to all parts of the body, eventually flowing into this

Vena Cava

20

From the vena cava, the blood enters this to begin the cycle again

Right Atrium

21

Describe the circulation of the blood through the heart, beginning with the right atrium

Right atrium, through the tricuspid valve to right ventricle, through semilunar valves to pulmonary artery to lungs to capillaries, around alveoli to pick up oxygen and give off carbon dioxide, to pulmonary veins to left atrium through bicuspid valve to left ventricle through semilunar valves to aorta to all parts of the body to vena cava and return to right atrium

22

The aorta arises from the left ventricle and arches backward, descending to the left. For descriptive purposes it may be considered as being subdivided into

Ascending aorta
Arch of the aorta
Thoracic Aorta
Abdominal Aorta

23

The ascending aorta has two small brances, which supply blood to the heart muscle

Right and left coronary arteries

24

The coronary arteries divide into many tiny branches called

Capillaries

25

From the capillaries the hearts blood supply flows into the

Cardiac Valves

26

From the cardiac veins, the heart's blood supply flows into the

Coronary Sinus

27

From the coronary sinus the blood enters the

Right atrium

28

Trace the path of the blood as it flows to nourish the heart

From the heart to ascending aorta to right and left coronary arteries to heart capillaries to cardiac veins to coronary sinus to right atrium

29

The arch of the aorta contains three branches. The first and largest branch is called the

Innominate Artery

30

The second branch of the aortic arch is called the

Left Common carotid Artery

31

The third branch of the aortic arch is called the

Left Subclavian Artery

32

What are the three branches of the aortic arch, in order?

Innominate Artery, Left Common Carotid Artery, Left Subclavian Artery

33

The innominate artery divides into two branches. The branch going upward is called the

Right Common Carotid Artery

34

The second branch of the innominate artery extends toward the right arm, called the

Right Subclavian

35

Branching off both the right and left subclavian arteries and extending upward towards the head are the

Vertebral Arteries

36

The right vertebral artery comes from the

Right Subclavian Artery

37

The left vertebral artery comes from the

Left Subclavian Artery

38

The left subclavian arteries supply blood to the

Upper Extremities

39

At the outer border of the first rib the subclavian artery becomes the

Axillary Artery

40

After the subclavian passes the first rib, it is called the

Aaxillary Artery

41

After the axillary passes the axilla, it is called the

Brachial Artery

42

Just below the elbow, the brachial artery divides into two branches, called the

Radial and ulnar arteries

43

Both the radial and the ulnar arteries extend into the palm of the hand where they subdivide into the

Superficial and Deep Volar Arches

44

The superficial and deep volar arches extend into the

Digital Arteries

45

From the digital arteries the blood flows into

Arterioles and Capillaries

46

Trace the path of the blood from the heart to the capillaries of the left hand

Heart to ascending aorta to arch of the aorta to left subclavian artery to axillary artery to brachial artery to radial and ulnar arteries to superficial and deep volar arches to digital arteries to arterioles to capillaries

47

From the capillaries, the blood flows into the

Venules

48

The venules then carry the blood to the

Superficial and deep volar venous arches

49

The blood from the superficial volar venous arches flows into a network of superficial veins, known as the

Dorsal Venous Network of the hand

50

From the dorsal venous network, two large veins extend superficially upward, returning the blood towards the heart, known as the

Cephalic and Basilic Veins

51

This extends superficially from the dorsal venous network along the thumb side of the arm

Cephalic Vein

52

This extends superficially upward along the little finger side of the arm

Basilic Vein

53

The cephalic vein extends upward to empty into the

Axillary Vein

54

The basilic vein extends superficially upward and then joins the brachial vein to form the

Axillary Vein

55

The blood from the venules enters the

Superficial and deep volar venous arches

56

The superficial volar venous arches branch into the

Cephalic vein and Basilic Vein

57

The deep volar venous arches branch into the

Radial and Ulnar Veins

58

The radial and ulnar veins combine just below the elbow to form the

Brachial Vein

59

The Brachial vein extends upwards into the

Axillary Vein

60

The axillary vein also receives the blood flowing from the

Cephalic vein and Basilic vein (once joined with the brachial vein)

61

On the right side the axillary vein extends into the

Right Subclavian Vein

62

The left subclavian vein empties into the

Left Innominate Vein

63

The right and left innominate veins empty into the

Superior Vena Cava

64

The superior vena cava extends into the

Right Atrium of the Heart

65

Trace the path of the blood from the heart to the left hand and return

Left ventricle of heart, ascending aorta, left subclavian artery from arch of aorta, axillary artery, brachial artery, radial and ulnar arteries, superficial and deep volar arches, digital arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, superficial and deep volar arches, from superficial to dorsal venous network, to cephalic vein to axillary vein and from basilic vein to brachial vein to axillary vein, from depp volar to radial and ulnar veins, to brachial vein, to axillary vein, left subclavian vein, left innominate vein, superior vena cava, Right Atrium of the heart

66

From the first artery in the arch of the aorta is the

Innominate artery

67

The second artery in the arch of the aorta is the

Left Common Carotid

68

The third artery in the arch of the aorta is the

Left Subclavian

69

The innominate artery subdivides into the

Right Common Carotid and Right Subclavian

70

Each of the subclavian artery has an upward branch, called the

Vertebral Artery

71

These arteries extend upward and supply blood to the head and neck

Common Carotids and Vertebral

72

The common carotid arteries extend upward along the traches until they reach the upper border of the

Thyroid cartilage

73

At the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, the common carotids divide into the

External carotid and Internal Carotid Arteries

74

The external carotid arteries supply blood to the

Neck, face, mouth, jaws, and scalp

75

The internal carotid arteries supply blood to the

Brain, eyes, forehead, and nose

76

The first principal branch of the external carotid artery is the

Superior Thyroid Artery

77

The Superior Thyroid Artery supplies blood to the

Thyroid Gland

78

The second principal branch of the external carotid artery is the

Lingual Artery

79

The lingual artery leads to the

Tongue

80

The third branch off the external carotid artery is the

External Maxillary Artery

81

The external Maxillary Artery leads toward the

Face

82

The fourth principal branch of the External Carotid Artery is the

Occipital Artery

83

The occipital artery leads toward the

Scalp

84

After the occipital branch, the external carotid artery subdivides into two main branches

Superficial temporal and Internal Maxillary Arteries

85

The internal maxillary artery leads towards the

Deep structures of the face, towards the covering of the brain, and towards the teeth and jaws

86

The blood flows through all of these arteries into arterioles, into capillaries, into venules, and then finally two large veins, the

Posterior facial and posterior Auricular Vein

87

The posterior facial vein and the posterior auricular vein combine to form the

External jugular vein

88

The external jugular veins empty into the

Subclavian veins

89

The right external jugular vein empties into the

Right Subclavian Veins

90

The left external jugular vein empties into the

Left Subclavian Veins

91

The right and left subclavian veins empty into the

Right and left innominate veins

92

The right and left innominate veins combine to form the

Superior Vena Cava

93

The superior vena cava leads into the

Right Atrium of the heart

94

The brain is supplied with blood by means of the

Common Carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries

95

The right common carotid artery arises from the

Innominate artery and the left common carotid artery

96

The right and left vertebral arteries arise from the corresponding

Subclavian Arteries

97

The right and left vertebral arteries extend upwards to the base of the brain where they unit to form the

Basilar Artery

98

The basilar artery branches into the

Right and left posterior Cerebral Arteries

99

The right and left common carotid arteries extend upwards along the trachea until the reach the upper border of the thyroid cartilage where they subdivide into the

External and Internal Carotid Arteries

100

The first major branch of the internal carotid artery is the

Ophthalmic Artery

101

The ophthalmic artery carries blood to the

Eye

102

Other than the ophthalmic artery, where do the branches off the internal carotid artery go?

To the Brain

103

When the right and left internal carotid arteries reach the base of the brain they divide into several branches. The first branches are the

Posterior Communicating Arteries

104

The posterior communicating arteries lead to the corresponding

Posterior Cerebral Arteries

105

After giving off its first branch, the internal carotid artery subdivides into two parts, the

Anterior cerebral artery and Middle Cerebral artery

106

The right and left anterior cerebral arteries are connected by means of the

Anterior Communicating Artery

107

List the arteries involved in the Circle of Willis

Anterior Cerebrals
Communicatings
Middle Cerebrals
Posterior Communicating
Posterior Cerebrals
Internal Carotids
Vertebrals
Basilar

108

The Circle of Willis is formed by the anterior cerebral arteries, which are branches of the

Internal Carotid Arteries

109

From the cerebral arteries, the blood flows to

All parts of the brain

110

From the brain, blood flows into the

Cerebral Veins

111

From the cerebral veins the blood flows into the various

Cranial Venous Sinuses

112

The uppermost of the cranial venous sinuses is the

Superior Sagittal Sinus

113

The superior Sagittal sinus connects with the

Straight Sinus

114

The superior sagittal sinus connects with the straight sinus to form the paired

Transverse Sinuses

115

Leading into the straight sinus is the

Inferior Sagittal Sinus

116

The paired transverse sinuses lead into the

Right and Left Internal Jugular Veins

117

The right internal jugular vein joins the right subclavian vein to form the

Right Innominate Vein

118

The left internal jugular vein joins the left subclavian vein to form the

Let Innominate Vein

119

The right and left innominate veins lead into the

Superior Vena Cava

120

The right and left innominate veins lead into the Superior Vena Cava which in turn leads into the

Right Atrium

121

Connecting with the straight sinus is the

Inferior Sagittal Sinus

122

As the aorta leaves the heart, the upward part is called the

Ascending aorta

123

As the aorta leaves the heart, the curved part is called the

Arch of the aorta

124

As the aorta leaves the heart, the descending part, down to the diaphragm, is called the

Thoracic Aorta

125

The thoracic aorta has many small branches which may be divided into two main groups,

Visceral and parietal arteries

126

These supply the blood to the viscera of the chest

Visceral Arteries

127

These supply the blood to the walls of the chest cavity

Parietal Arteries

128

The visceral arteries (3) branching from the thoracic aorta are the

Bronchial Arteries, Esophageal Arteries, and Pericardial Arteries

129

The parietal arteries branching from the thoracic aorta are the

Intercostal Arteries and Superior Phrenic arteries

130

The intercostal arteries lead to the

Skin and Muscles of the chest wall

131

The Superior phrenic arteries lead to the

Upper Surface of the Diaphragm

132

The blood flows from the thoracic aorta through the

Visceral and parietal arteries

133

The blood flows from the thoracic aorta through the visceral and parietal arteries, through the

Arterioles and capillaries

134

The blood flows from the thoracic aorta through the visceral and parietal arteries, through the arterioles and capillaries to the body parts and then into the

Venules and veins

135

From the upper surface of the diaphragm the blood flows into the

Superior Phrenic Veins

136

From the superior phrenic veins, the blood flows into the

Left Innominate vein

137

The blood flows from the pericardium through the

`Pericardial Veins

138

The blood flows from the esophagus through the

Esophageal Veins

139

Both the esophageal veins and the pericardial veins empty into the

Left innominate Vein

140

The blood flows to the bronchi through the

Bronchial arteries

141

The blood flows from the bronchi through the

Bronchial Veins

142

The blood flows to the muscles and skin of the chest wall through the

Intercostal arteries

143

The blood flows from the muscles and skin of the chest wall through the

intercostal Veins

144

The blood flows from the bronchial veins and from the intercostal veins through the

Azygos Vein

145

From the azygos vein, the blood flows into the

Superior Vena Cava

146

Trace the flow of blood from the heart to the esophagus and return

From heart to ascending aorta to arch of aorta to thoracic aorta to esophageal arteries to esophagus to esophageal veins to left innominate vein to superior vena cava to heart

147

As the blood leaves the heart it flows into the

Ascending aorta and then the arch of the aorta

148

From the arch of the aorta blood flows into the

Thoracic aorta

149

The thoracic aorta extends down to the

Diaphragm

150

Below the diaphragm, the blood enters the

Abdominal Aorta

151

The first group of arteries extending from the abdominal aorta are the

Inferior Arteries

152

The inferior Phrenic Arteries lead to the

Under Surface of the Diaphragm

153

The blood flows from the inferior phrenic veins to the

Inferior Vena Cava

154

After the inferior phrenic arteries, the next artery extending from the abdominal aorta is the

Celiac Artery

155

The Celiac artery subdivides into

Three branches

156

The three branches of the celiac artery are the

Left Gastric Artery
Hepatic Artery
Splenic Artery

157

The left gastric artery leads to parts of the

Stomach and esophagus

158

The splenic artery extends to the

Pancreas, spleen, and parts of the stomach

159

The hepatic artery supplies blood directly to the

Liver

160

The hepatic artery gives off three branches

Right gastric artery
Gastroduodenal artery
Cystic artery

161

All of the blood coming from the celiac artery, except for the branch from the hepatic artery, flows to the indicated parts of the digestive system through the proper arteries and from there through the corresponding veins and then empties into the

Portal vein

162

The portal vein carries blood to the

Liver

163

From the liver, the blood flows into the

Hepatic Veins

164

From the hepatic veins, the blood flows into the

Inferior Vena Cava

165

The first branches of the abdominal aorta are the

Inferior Phrenic Arteries

166

The second branch of the abdominal aorta are the

Celiac Artery

167

After the celiac artery, the next branch of the abdominal aorta is the

Superior mesenteric artery

168

The superior mesenteric artery leads to the

Small intestine and half of the large intestine

169

This extends from the abdominal aorta to the other half of the large intestine

The Inferior Mesenteric Artery

170

The vein receiving the blood flowing from the inferior mesenteric artery is the

Inferior mesenteric Vein

171

From the inferior mesenteric vein, the blood flows into the

Splenic Vein

172

The blood flowing from the digestive organs flows into the

Portal Veins

173

Along the abdominal aorta, just below the superior mesenteric artery, there are two branches

Right and left renal arteries

174

The Renal arteries carry the blood to the

Kidneys

175

The renal veins empty into the

Inferior Vena Cava

176

Just above the renal arteries are the

Suprarenal Arteries

177

The Suprarenal arteries lead to the Suprarenal glands, also known as

Adrenal Glands

178

From the left suprarenal vein, the blood flows into the

Left Renal Vein

179

From the left renal vein the blood flows into the

Inferior Vena Cava

180

The right suprarenal vein empties directly into the

Inferior vena Cava

181

Another part of the arteries arising form the abdominal aorta at a point below the renal arteries are the

Spermatic or Ovarian Arteries

182

Both the left spermatic vein and the left ovarian vein empty into the

Left Renal Vein

183

The blood flows from the left renal vein into the

Inferior Vena Cava

184

The blood flowing from the right spermatic vein or the right ovarian vein flows directly into the

Inferior Vena Cava

185

Just below the spermatic or ovarian arteries on the abdominal aorta are the

Lumbar arteries

186

The lumbar arteries extend to the

Muscles of the skin and abdominal wall, lumbar vertebra, and the spinal cord

187

The lumbar veins empty into the

Inferior Vena Cava

188

Just above the end of the abdominal aorta is the

Middle Sacral Artery

189

The Middle Sacral Artery extends to the

Sacrumand coccyx

190

This receives blood flowing from the sacrum and coccyx

Middle Sacral Vein

191

From the middle sacral vein, the blood flows into th

Inferior vena cava

192

At its lower end, the abdominal aorta divides into two branches

Right and Left Common Iliac Arteries

193

The right and left common iliac arteries divide into the

External iliac and hypogastric arteries

194

What supplies blood to the pelvis?

Hypogastric Artery

195

The hypogastric Artery supplies blood to the

Pelvis

196

The hypogastric veins empty into the

Common iliac veins

197

The common iliac veins empty into the

Inerior Vena Cava

198

This artery carries the blood from the hepatic artery to the stomach and duodenum

Gastroduodenal

199

From the stomach and duodenum, the blood flows into the

Gastroduodenal ein

200

At its terminal end, the abdominal aorta divide into the

Right and left common iliac arteries

201

Each common iliac artery subdivides into the

External iliac and hypogastric artery

202

The external iliac arteries extend to the

Lower extremeties

203

The external iliac artery extends towards the thigh where it is called the

Femoral Artery

204

At the back of the knee, the femoral artery becomes the

Popliteal Artery

205

The common iliac artery divides into these

External Iliac and Hypogastric Arteries

206

Just below the knee, the popliteal artery subdivides into the

Anterior and Posterior Tibial arteries

207

The anterior tibial artery continues along the anterior part of the leg to the ankle joint where it becomes the

Dorsalis Pedis Artery

208

From the dorsalis pedis artery, the blood flows to the

Plantar Arch of the foot

209

The posterior tibial artery extends along the back of the leg to the ankle. Just below the knee, it gives off one large branch, the

Peroneal Artery

210

At the ankle the posterior tibial artery divides into the

Medial and lateral plantar arteries

211

The medial and lateral plantar arteries form the plantar arch which also receives blood from the

Dosalis Pedis

212

From the plantar arch, the blood flows to all parts of the ____ through small arterteries, arterioles, and capillaries

Foot

213

The blood returning from the foot flows into the venules of the foot and then the

Dorsal Venous Arch

214

From the dorsal venous arch the blood flows either through

Superficial or deep set of veins

215

The blood flows from the venules into the dorsal venous arch and then, superficially, into the

Small saphenous or great saphenous vein

216

Where is the small saphenous vein located

Along the back of the leg

217

Where is the great saphenous vein located

Along the medial side of the leg

218

The small saphenous vein empties into the

Deep Popliteal Vein

219

From the dorsalis pedis vein, the blood flows into the

Anterior Tibial Vein

220

The medial and lateral plantar veins empty into the

Posterior Tibial Vein

221

The femoral vein empties into the

External Iliac Vein

222

The femoral vein empties into the external iliac vein which in turn empties into the

Common Iliac Vein

223

The common iliac veins empty into the

Inferior Vena Cava