Chapter 14 Part 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 14 Part 2 Deck (22):
1

Ptosis

drooping of the eyelid

2

Diplopia

double vision

3

Lesion of oculumotor nerve

Ptosis (drooping of the eyelid)
Ipsilateral eye looks outward and down
Diplopia (double vision)
Deficits in moving the ipsilateral eye medially, downward, and upward
Loss of pupillary reflex and consensual response to light
Loss of constriction of the pupil in response to focusing on a near object (accommodation)

4

Lesion of trochlear nerve:

prevents activation of the superior oblique muscle;

5

Symptoms of lesion of trochlear nerve:

Symptoms include double vision, difficulty reading, and visual problems when descending stair

6

Lesion of abducens nerve:

cause the eye to look inward; paralysis of the lateral rectus muscle leaves the pull of the medial rectus muscle unopposed

7

Patient presentation of abducens nerve:

unable to voluntarily abduct the eye and have double vision

8

What cranial nerves are involved in autonomic function?

III, VII, IX,X

9

What does complete severance of any branch of the trigeminal nerve result in?

in anesthesia of the area supplied by the ophthalmic, maxillary, or mandibular branch

10

If ophthalmic division of trigeminal nerve is affected:

afferent limb of the blink reflex will be interrupted, preventing blinking in response to touch stimulation of the cornea

11

If mandibular branch of trigeminal nerve is affected:

the jaw will deviate toward the involved side when the mouth is opened; the masseter reflex will be lost

12

Lesion of facial nerve:

paralysis or paresis of the ipsilateral muscles of facial expression: one side of the face to droop, unable to completely close the ipsilateral eye

13

Conductive deafness:

occurs when transmission of vibrations is prevented in the outer or middle ear

14

Causes of conductive deafness:

include excessive wax in the outer ear canal or inflammation in middle ear (otitis media)

15

Sensorineural deafness:

due to damage of the receptor cells or the cochlear nerve and is less common than conductive deafness

16

Causes of sensorineural deafness:

acoustic trauma, ototoxic drugs, Ménière's disease, and acoustic neuroma.

17

Lesion of glossopharyngeal nerve:

interrupts the afferent limb of both the gag reflex and the swallowing reflex.
Salivation is also decreased

18

Lesion of vagus nerve:

results in difficulty speaking and swallowing, poor digestion, asymmetrical elevation of the palate, and hoarseness

19

Complete lesion of accessory nerve:

paralyzes the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles

20

Complete lesion of hypoglossal nerve:

causes atrophy of the ipsilateral tongue

21

Dyphagia:

difficulty with swallowing

22

Dysarthria

poor control of the speech muscles