Chapter 38: Pharm of Cancer Flashcards Preview

Pharmacology > Chapter 38: Pharm of Cancer > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 38: Pharm of Cancer Deck (31)
1

This drug inhibits thymidylate synthase, thus decreasing availability of dTMP = "thymineless death"

Fluorouracil (5-FU)

2

What is the orally available prodrug of 5-FU?

Capecitabine

3

GI cancers, breast cancer, skin cancer like basal cell carcinoma can be treated by this inhibitor of thymidylate synthase....

5-FU

4

What are the major adverse effects of 5-FU?

myelosuppression

photosensitivity

(atherosclerosis, cerebellar syndrome, vision changes, alopecia, GI probs)

5

6-MP effectiveness and toxicity is increased by ______?

allopurinol

6

6-MP MOA?

inhibit IMP dehydrogenase to prevent formation of GMP/AMP by IMP

7

6-MP and Azathioprine have the same MOA - which one is used mainly for immunosuppression and which is used mainly for ALL/AML?

Immunosupression - azathioprine

ALL/AML - 6-MP

8

What drug inhibits ribonucleotide reductase? (thus decreasing DNA synthesis...S phase specificty)

Hydroxyurea

9

What does hydroxyurea do in the treatment of sickle cell disease?

increases HbF

10

Drug used in the treatment of myeloprolierative disorders like essential thrombocytosis or polycythemia vera

hydroxyurea

11

What are the major adverse effects of hydroxyurea?

myelosuppression

GI disturbance

12

MOA of cyclophosphamide

covalently binds DNA...
directly modify DNA structure - alkylating agent

13

What are the major adverse effects of cyclophosphamide?

Myelosuppression, hemorrhagic cystitis (BLADDER!!!)

14

An alkylating agent that is one of the most versatile nitrogen mustards in clinical use. It is a prodrug that must be first activated by hepatic P-450 to produce its active metabolites.

Cyclophosphamide

15

What potentiates the action of 5-FU?

Folinic acid

16

Super versatile, broad spectrum agent used to treat autoimmune disease, leukemias, lymphomas, mycosis fungoides, neuroblastoma, malignant histiocytosis, and more.

cyclophosphamide

17

Alkylating agent that directly binds DNA and is used for the treatment of brain cancer

Carmustine

18

Agents that cross link intra-strand guanine bases used in the tx of genitourinary cancers (including testicular), lung cancer....

Cisplatin

Carboplatin

19

What are the major adverse effects of cisplatin and carboplatin? Which of these is exclusive to cisplatin?

Myelosuppresion, peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity

Nephrotoxicity - cisplatin only

20

How do you limit the nephrotoxicity of cisplatin?

co admin with amifostine

21

Bleomycin MOA?

Binds oxygen and chelates iron ....binds DNA --> STRAND BREAKS via generating oxidative intermediates

22

What is the dose limiting side effect of bleomycin?

pulmonary fibrosis

irreversible

23

What types of cancers is bleomycin used to treat? Why?

Potentially curable cancers because pulmonary fibrosis effect can be so bad

testicular cancer, hodgkins disease, non hodg lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma

24

Doxorubicin and daunorubicin made adverse effect? MOA?

heart failure

inhibit top II - G2 phase of cell cycle

25

What top I inhibitor can cause life threatening diarrhea?

TECANS -
irinoTECAN
topoTECAN

26

In giving doxorubicin to a pt with hepatic dysfxn, what must you keep in mind?

reduce dosing bc drug is excreted in bile

27

Vinblastine MOA and dose limiting effect?

binds tubulin subunits and prevents microtubule polymerization

bone marrow suppression is dose limiting

28

Vincristine MOA and dose limiting effect?

binds tubulin subunits and prevents microtubule polymerization

peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting

29

Which drugs come from the peri-winkle plant?

vincristine & vinblastine

30

What drug inhibits microtubule DEpolymerization? What is this drug's dose limiting effect?

paclitaxel

peripher neuropathy - stocking/glove sensory loss

31

AIDS related Kaposi sarcoma can be treated by this drug that comes from a western yew tree

paclitaxel