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Flashcards in English Deck (162)
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1

Woods used in English Furniture

Oak, Walnut, Mahogany, Satinwood

2

Noteworthy English Furniture Designers

William Kent, Thomas Chippendale

3

Split Spindle

A long, slender turned spindle that has been cut in half lengthwise, commonly applied as ornament to furniture and cabinetry of 17th-century England and America.

4

Arcaded Panel

Typical English Renaissance panel decoration consisting of two stubby columns with arches in low relief, also used on chests in the French Renaissance.

5

Wattle-and-daub

Area between wooden posts on a half-timbered exterior. Could be brick, mortar, or plaster.

Also,

Construction made of interwoven poles or sticks (wattle) on which is plastered a layer of clay, dung, or mud (daub).

6

Gable

A gable is the generally triangular portion of a wall between the edges of a sloping roof.

7

Half-timbered

A type of exposed wood framing with an infill of plaster, brick, stone, or masonry, often filled with a daub of clay, sticks, and mud.

8

Apsidal

A small apse on the aisle side of a Christian church or basilica.

9

Scagliola

From the Italian term scaglia, meaning chip. A faux marble produced from plaster or cement and marble chips. Evidence shows use of scagliola in ancient Rome. It was also popular during the Italian Baroque and continued through the19th century, particularly with the Adam brothers in England.

10

Strapwork

Flat, carved intertwining bands that resemble leather straps, often used in ceilings, panels, screens, and furniture.

- Used in arabesque and rinceau.

ENGLISH RENAISSANCE

11

Seaweed Marquetry

- Fine scale, linear veneer/marquetry design.

- Only two kinds of wood.

- English William and Mary and Queen Anne period

12

Bolection

A molding projecting far past the wall plane or panel to which it is applied. Often used to conceal a joint between surfaces of different levels. Also called balection, belection, bellexion, bilection, and bolexion.

13

Jappanning

A process, much used in the eighteenth century by which furniture and metalwork were enameled with colored shellac and the decoration raised and painted with gold and colors.

14

Name technique used:

Parcel gilt (Partly guilded)

15

Name this technique:

Crossbanding

A term used when a narrow border of veneer is inserted on the surface of furniture, wainscoting, etc., so that the wood veneer is at right angles to the grain of the adjacent wood.

16

Ribband-back

A Chippendale chair back characterized by interlacing carved ribbons connecting the stiles.

17

Marlborough leg

A straight, sometimes fluted leg usually terminating with a block foot.

18

Spade

A tapered rectangular furniture foot resembling the blade of a garden shovel or spade, popular in the 18th-century English designs of George Hepplewhite and Thomas Sheraton.

19

Pier glasses

A glass or mirror designed to stand on the floor against a wall surface, or a mirror designed to be placed between windows, over a chimney-piece, or over a console table.

20

Wainscot chairs

A wooden chair with a back paneled like a wainscot.

21

Turned legs

Turned legs

22

Melon bulb

A heavy, elaborately carved, bulbous turning resembling a melon in shape, commonly used as a support on Elizabethan and Jacobean furniture.

ENGLISH RENAISSANCE

23

Pad foot

A foot used to terminate a cabriole leg, characterized by a flat circular bottom with little or no carved ornamentation; similar to a club foot without the disk at the base.

24

Club foot

A round, pad-shaped foot found on a cabriole leg; used in 18thcentury English furniture.

25

Windsor chair

A popular 18th- and 19th-century chair in England and America made of wood and having a spindle back shaped in fans, hoops, or combs and sometimes spindle legs named for Windsor Castle. It is also called a stickback.

26

Chintz

A printed and glazed cotton fabric with floral designs, usually in bright colors; originally a painted or stained calico from India, used in Europe for bedcovers and draperies, especially toile de Jouy, which was manufactured from 1700 to 1843 at Juoy, near Paris. An unglazed calico is called cretonne.

27

Trifid foot

28

Styles within the English Renaissance period

Tudor style

Elizabethan style

Jacobean style

Cromwellian style

29

English Renaissance Domestic Characteristics

Plans were in shapes of letters: L, E, or H

- White washed / plastered half-timbered exterior

- Protruding second level so that waste water would not run down entire facade

30

Oriel window

A large bay window supported by corbels or brackets.

- Invented because taxes were based on room number, so space could be created without additional taxes.