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Furnishings: Prehistoric to English > Gothic > Flashcards

Flashcards in Gothic Deck (51)
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1

Gothic

- Originated in France

- Characterized by height and delicacy - pointed arch, buttress, tracery, and large windows

- Wood becomes common in furniture

- Structure dominated by thrust and counterthrust

- Highly religious time

2

Gothic Cathedral

- became the center of town life

- acted as town hall, school, museum, and gallery

- Christian church

- Cathedrals were built to give people work and as a tourist attraction

- Often unknown designers

3

Fundamental teachings of the Gothic Church

Piety - the fullfillment of Religious obligations

Humility - modesty and humbleness in the eyes of the church

Asceticism - a measure of personal and spiritual discipline

4

Gothic art

Appealed to the emotional side of people who were ignorant and superstitious

5

Tracery

Ornamental stone mullions commonly found
in the stained glass of Gothic architecture.

6

Latin cross plan

A cross with three short equal arms and
one extended lower arm.

 

7

Nave

The central section of a
Latin cross church, generally
terminated by an apse and
flanked by aisles.

8

Transcept

The central section of a
Latin cross church, generally
terminated by an apse and
flanked by aisles.

9

Apse

The semicircular or angular
extension usually in the east end
of a Christian church or basilica.

10

Ambulatory

The aisle or passageway around the apse in a
church.

11

Narthex

The arcaded porch of a
church that leads to the nave.

12

Pointed arch

Allowed for harmonious, unified effect and more illumination.

13

Ribbed vault / groin vault

14

stained glass windows

Often 20' wide by 30' high

- Windows were so big that they needed large stone mullions for support.

- People were illiterate. Stained glass windows told stories of the bible.

15

Rose window

A large circular window with
tracery resembling a stylized
rose, usually in the façade of a
Gothic church or cathedral.

16

Buttress

An exterior architectural support commonly found
in Gothic era cathedrals, tied into masonry walls
in order to disburse the structure’s load bearing
weight.

17

Flying buttress

A finger-like arch that extends from
a wall to a buttress, designed to
counteract the thrust of a roof or
vault, typically found on the exterior
of Gothic cathedrals.

Used so cathedrals could grow higher.

18

Gargoyle

A grotesque carved human or animal figure
often used as a rain spout in Gothic architecture.

19

Chimera

A mythological animal, originating with the Greeks and
Romans, with the head of a lion,
part goat, with a dragon tail.

Was not functional. Decoration.

20

Castle

- Mote or ditch

- fixed bridge and draw bridge

- Outside wall known as a curtain wall. Could be 8' to 20' thick

- Tower to watch for intruders

- Keep where people lived - located in the highest point. The most secure place in the castle. Contained kitchen, great hall, servant sleeping quarters, lord/lady sleeping quarters.

- A chapel

- Poorly ventilated. Cold in the winter, wet/damp in summer.

21

Gothic living

- Very little comfort due to political conditions

22

Keep floorplan

23

Great hall

- Two stories high

- Exposed beams or trusses, which were painted

- Stone, brick, or tile floor

- Sometimes straw lined floor because they brought animals inside when under attack

- Minstrel gallery

- Would sometimes have a fire pit area.

- Tapestries on the walls.

24

Spiral staircase

Easier for inhabitant to swordfight in a downward direction to defend castle (most people were right handed). 

25

Dais

A raised platform commonly used in the Great Hall of medieval castles
as a place for nobles to dine.

Usually had two throne-like chairs for lord and lady.

26

Lancet windows

A tall, narrow window with a sharply pointed, arched top typical of the English Gothic Style.

Found in great halls and cathedrals

27

Fireplaces

- Moved from center of room to side.

- Could be deep around 6'

28

Gothic tapestries

Used natural dyes.

29

Ogee

An arch containing S-shaped
curves on either side that converge to form a point, commonly found in Islamic architecture.
Also identified as an ogive or
keel arch.

30

Arcading

A series of columns with their
entablatures or arches that are
represented in relief to decorate
panels or fill open frames, especially in the 17th century.