File 2.0-2.3: Phonetics (F) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in File 2.0-2.3: Phonetics (F) Deck (58)
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1

phonetics

The study of minimal units that make up language. How sounds are produced and perceived

2

Which different aspects of sound can be studied in the communication chain?

- Articulatory phonetics
- Acoustic phonetics
- Auditory phonetics

3

articulatory phonetics

The study of the production of speech sound.

4

acoustic phonetics

The study of the transmission an the physical properties of speech sound.

5

auditory phonetics

The study of the perception of speech sounds.

6

impressionistic phonetic transcription

A tool for the study of phonetic analysis.
Textbook def: A method of writing
down speech sounds with the intent of capturing how they are
pronounced (e.g., by using a phonetic alphabet). Usually based
simply on how the sounds are perceived when heard without any
special analysis.

7

phone

Sound

8

co-articulation

The influence of one sound on a neighboring sound.

9

categories for speech stream

- Segments
- Suprasegmentals

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segments

Segments are the discrete units of speech stream that can be subdivided into consonants and vowels.

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suprasegmentals

Are qualities on top of segments and contain properties like stress, tone and intonation.

12

How do consonants and vowels differ when you look at air flow?

Consonants can either completely or partly block the air flow, while vowels have at most a slight narrowing.

13

What are the different ways we can distinguish between consonants and vowels?

- Air flow
- Syllables

14

syllable

A unit of speech (uh, sprint, mountain=two)

15

What can a syllable be broken down into?

- Onset
- Rhyme

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rhyme

In a syllable, the vowel and any consonants that follow it.

17

What can rhyme be divided into?

- Nucleus
- Coda

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onset

In a syllable, any consonant(s) that occurs before the
rhyme.

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nucleus

The core element of a syllable, carrying stress, length,
and pitch (tone). It usually consists of a vowel or a syllabic
consonant.

20

coda

In a syllable, any consonant(s) that occur in the rhyme,
after the nucleus.

21

What can vowels be divided into?

- Monophthongs
- Diphthongs

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monophthongs

Simple vowel, composed of a single configuration of the vocal organs. (Naive are two monophthongs, [a] and [i])

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diphthongs

A complex vowel, composed of a sequence of
two different configurations of the vocal organs. However, they're still single vowels. (Knives [ai] is diphthong)

24

running speech (or continuous speech)

Using language in phrases and sentences where all the words run together.
Textbook def: The usual form of spoken language, with
all the words and phrases run together, without pauses in between them. Sometimes called continuous speech.

25

articulatory description

For an auditory-vocal language, the description of the motion or positioning of the parts of the vocal tract that are responsible for the production of a speech sound.
For a visual-gestural
language, the description of the motions or positioning of the hands, arms, and relevant facial expressions.

26

articulation (or articulatory gesture)

The motion or positioning of some part of the vocal tract (often, but not always, a muscular part such as the tongue or lips) with respect to some other surface of the vocal tract in the production of a speech sound.

27

What 3 different aspects are important to mention when describing a consonant?

- Voiced or voiceless?
- Where is the airstream constricted? (place of articulation)
- How is the airstream constricted? (manner of articulation)

28

segmental features

The voicing, place and manner of articulation

29

Which basic components of human anatomy are involved in the production of speech?

- Larynx
- Vocal tract
- Subglottal system

30

larynx (voice box)

Contains the vocal folds and the glottis, is located in the throat at the Adam's apple.