Gallibacterium, Haemophilus, Histophilus Flashcards Preview

Micro Exam 3 > Gallibacterium, Haemophilus, Histophilus > Flashcards

Flashcards in Gallibacterium, Haemophilus, Histophilus Deck (26)
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1

Gallibacterium anatis is incrimminated with causing peritonitis in _____ and can cause severe peritonitis in association with ________

Chickens
E. coli

2

What are the Haemophilus species we are concerned with? (3)

Haemophilus parasuis
Haemophilus suis
Haemophilus influenzae

3

T/F Haemophilus parasuis requires an NAD growth factor

TRUE

4

Haemophilus parasuis causes __________ in pigs, which is characterized by polyserositis, arthritis, and meningitis

glasser's disease

5

Where is Haemophilus parasuis commonly found?

Nasopharynx of healthy pigs

6

Haemophilus parasuis is ______ contagious and spreads via _______

HIGHLY
aerosol or contact

7

What generally brings about an infection of Haemophilus parasuis? What are some signs that are seen?

Stress
fibrinous inflammation of pericardium, pleura, joints, and meninges

8

Haemophils parasuis can predispose this pig to infections with _____ & ______

Bordatella bronchiseptica
Pasturella multocida

9

______ common predisposes the pig to an infection of Haemophilus parasuis

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

10

What are the 4 serotypes of Haemophilus parasuis that are most prevalent?

1, 2, 4, 5

11

Does Haemophilus suis actually exist?

NO ONE KNOWS! Maybe? Maybe not? It's a beautiful mystery

12

________ is a Haemophilus that is only found in humans as part of the normal flora of the respiratory tract

Haemophilus influenzae

13

The most common capsular type isolated from Haemophilus influenzae is composed of what?

polyribitol phosphate

14

Is it possible for this Gram negative Haemophilus influenzae to be mistaken for a Gram positive?

Yes, it is very possible, especially if you're a terrible microbiologist

15

Infections of Haemophilus influenzae often occur in individuals that lack _____ to the ___ capsular serotype

IgA
B

16

What are some clinical manifestations of Haemophilus influenzae?

Meningitis: esp in children 3 months to 6 years old
Acute epiglottitis: abscessation may occur
Cellulitis: Occurs in the cheek
Bacterimia without local disease
Otitis media: this is actually the 2nd leading cause of this

17

What age are children most susceptible to Haemophilus influenzae infection?

Older than 3 months (mothers immunity gone)
Younger than 2 years (can't respond with their own antibody)

18

______ is the cause of TME and respiratory disease in feedlot cattle

Histophilus somni

19

T/F Histophilus somni is one of the more important bacterial causes of respiratory disease in cattle

TRUE; in fact it is probably second only behind Mannheimia haemolytica

20

T/F Histophilus somni requires an NAD growth factor

FALSE; however, it does require CO2

21

What is the toxin that Histophilus somni produces?

Endotoxin; LOS also may be important in apoptosis of endothelial cells

22

T/F Histophilus somni can live within blood monocytes for a short period of time

TRUE; this likely allows it to become disseminated throughout the body

23

What is the habitat of Histophilus somni?

The upper respiratory tract of bovine
Has also been found in the repro tracts of cattle, but these are less pathogenic

24

What is TME? When does it occur?

It usually occurs 2-4 weeks post shipping/stress; often follows shipping fever
Causes fibrinous meningitis with arterial thrombosis and necrosis

25

What is the pathogenesis of Histophilus somni?

Usually starts as a respiratory disease, becomes a septicemia, and eventually leads to TME.

26

What are the virulence factors that Histophilus somni produces?

Toxins: endotoxin and LOS
Guanine, Adenine, and GMP: likely allows the bacteria to evade immune system
Fc-receptor proteins