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Flashcards in Group Deck (52):
1

Lewin, Lippitt, and White

Studied Group Leadership Styles
They also found that children tend to act aggressively to autocratic and laissez faire leadership styles but responded receptively to the democratic style

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Autocratic

Group Leadership Styles

Authoritarian, rule bound, right/wrong driven, leader is extremely active and the center of the decision making

3

Democratic

Group Leadership Styles

Balanced and requests the input of group members

4

Laissez Faire

Group Leadership Styles

Little to no direction from the group leader

5

Jacob Moreno

Developed the technique of psychodrama or spontaneous dramatization/role playing

-Developed sociometry or a way to measure social relationships (i.e. sociogram)

6

Corey and Corey

Group Development Stages

Initial
Transition
Working
Final

7

Initial

Corey and Corey Group Development Stages

Getting to know each other, creating norms, focus on leader having a more present role, everyone has on a mask

8

Transition

Corey and Corey Group Development Stages

Members begin to challenge the leaders and each other, they take more risks, the leader is starting to become less active

9

Working

Corey and Corey Group Development Stages

Leader can look almost like a member in this stage, members are taking risks and participating regularly

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Final

Corey and Corey Group Development Stages

Termination or ending stage where members can revert back to earlier stages based on their comfort level, leader may have to become more active

11

Tuckman's Group Stages

Forming
Storming
Norming
Performing

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Forming

Tuckman's Group Stages

Initial stage, group is beginning

13

Storming

Tuckman's Group Stages

Transition stage, possibly conflict, tension

14

Norming

Tuckman's Group Stages

Mix of storming and performing stage. Transition

15

Performing

Tuckman's Group Stages

Group is working, the working stage

16

Yalom

Universality
Altruism
Installation of Hope
Imparting Information
Corrective Recapitulation of the Primary Family Experience
Development of Socializing Techniques
Imitative Behavior
Cohesiveness
Existential Factors
Catharsis
Interpersonal Learning
Self-Understanding

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Universality

The recognition of shared experiences and feelings among group members and that these may be widespread or universal human concerns, serves to remove a group member's sense of isolation, validate their experiences, and raise self-esteem

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Altruism

The group is a place where members can help each other, and the experience of being able to give something to another person can lift the member's self-esteem and help develop more adaptive coping styles and interpersonal skills.

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Installation of Hope

In a mixed group that has members at various stages of development or recovery, a member can be inspired and encouraged by another member who has overcome the problems with which they are still struggling.

20

Imparting Information

While this is not strictly speaking a psychotherapeutic process, members often report that it has been very helpful to learn factual information from other members in the group. For example, about their treatment or about access to services.

21

Corrective Recapitulation of the Primary Family Experience

Members often unconsciously identify the group therapist and other group members with their own parents and siblings in a process that is a form of transference specific to group psychotherapy. The therapist's interpretations can help group members’ gain
understanding of the impact of childhood experiences on their personality, and they may learn to avoid unconsciously repeating unhelpful past interactive patterns in present-day relationships.

22

Development of Socializing Techniques

The group setting provides a safe and supportive environment for members to take risks by extending their repertoire of interpersonal behavior and improving their social skills

23

Imitative Behavior

One way in which group members can develop social skills is through a modeling process, observing and imitating the therapist and other group members. For example, sharing personal feelings, showing concern, and supporting others.

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Cohesiveness

It has been suggested that this is the primary therapeutic factor from which all others flow. Humans are herd animals with an instinctive need to belong to groups, and personal development can only take place in an interpersonal context. A cohesive group is one in
which all members feel a sense of belonging, acceptance, and validation.

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Existential Factors

Learning that one has to take responsibility for one's own life and the consequences of one's decisions.

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Catharsis

Catharsis is the experience of relief from emotional distress through the free and uninhibited expression of emotion. When members tell their story to a supportive
audience, they can obtain relief from chronic feelings of shame and guilt.

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Interpersonal Learning

Group members achieve a greater level of self-awareness through the process of interacting with others in the group, who give feedback on the member's behavior and impact on others.

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Self-Understanding

This factor overlaps with interpersonal learning but refers to the achievement of greater levels of insight into the genesis of one's problems and the unconscious motivations that underlie one's behavior.

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Group Organizations

American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama founded by Moreno in 1942

American Group Psychotherapy Association founded in 1942 by Samuel Slavson

Association for Specialists in Group Work division of ACA

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Primary Group

Works on healthy lifestyle/coping strategies to reduce the incidence of a given behavior or issue (alcohol education group on campus that is mandatory for all freshman)

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Secondary Group

Reduces the severity or length of a problem and often includes a prevention component (grief group)

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Tertiary Group

Group that deals with serious, longstanding issues (group for those suffering with schizophrenia)

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Group Norms

Implicit and explicit rules that govern a group

34

Group Content

What is said in a group

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Group Process

How it is said/received/etc

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Group Cohesion

A sense of caring for the group and group members

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Risky Shift Phenomenon

Tendency for group’s decisions to become less conservative than if the individual members decided on their own

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T-Group

Training group

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Screening

Process of accession each potential client’s ability to fit into a group or group setting (should be done for every group)

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Open Group

Has the potential to have membership change every meeting, members can join after the group has started, slower to develop cohesion, members have varying experiences

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Closed Group

Does not allow any new group entries after the initial session, better cohesion (potentially), more security (potentially), could end up with no members and no

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Coleadership

Having 2 leaders working together to facilitate group work (has pros and cons)

43

Adult Groups

Should have 5-8 members (child groups should have fewer members)

44

Information Seeker

Group Roles

Wants clarification and suggestions

45

Information Giver

Group Roles

Offers facts and generalizations to the group

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Opinion Giver/Seeker

Group Roles

Looking for opinions not fact or info that can be generalized

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Encourager

Group Roles

Offers praise

48

Harmonizer

Group Roles

Resolves conflict when they are involved

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Compromiser

Group Roles

Resolves group conflict they are not involved in

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Dominator

Group Roles

Takes over group

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Blocker

Group Roles

Negative reactions to all suggestions/ways to problem solve

52

Scapegoat

Group Roles

Person who takes the blame for anything negative in the group